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Largest collection of original military art paintings, military art prints and pencil drawings by the leading military, aviation and naval artists, this exclusive range of over 4,000 military, naval and aviation art prints, many with free worldwide shipping, and a huge range of giclee canvas art prints, are all available at great prices, and even further discounts on our military print packs.

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Featured Artists : 

David Pentland

Military art from the first world war to modern day conflicts, including a vast number of different tanks and armoured vehicles.  Also a number of aviation and naval art prints.

Nicolas Trudgian

World renowned aviation artist.  Cranston Fine Arts purchased the remaining stock of Nick's published work several years ago.  Most of the print editions we purchased cannot be found elsewhere - we hold the only stock.

Ivan Berryman

One of the most prolific artists around, Ivan has created a massive and spectacular portfolio of aviation and naval art, with other subjects like motor racing and even Star Wars also included.  In addition to his current portfolio, we can also commission Ivan to produce new paintings for our customers - please contact us for more details.

Randall Wilson

Randall has a superb portfolio of naval artwork featuring ships from around the world. 

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Latest Military Art Releases



The Charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo - Sgt Ewart Captures the French Eagle by Jason Askew. (PC)


The Inniskillings at Waterloo by Jason Askew. (PC)
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (PC)
 The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War.  The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors.  The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with  some guts behind the bayonet thrusts!  Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours.  Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift.  During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range.  Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action.  He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine.  Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity.  British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Jason Askew. (PC)

Latest Aviation Art Releases

 With his personal emblem of black and white fuselage band adorning his Fokker E.V, 153/18, Richard Wenzl briefly commanded Jasta 6, based at Bernes in August 1918, and claimed a modest 6 victories during his career with JG 1. The Fokker E.V was both fast and manoeuvrable, but a series of engine and structural failures meant that these exciting new machines saw only brief service before being re-worked to emerge as the D.VIII, sadly too late to make any impression on the war. Wenzl is shown here in combat with Sopwith Camels of 203 Sqn, assisted by Fokker D.VIIs, which served alongside the E.Vs of Jasta 6. The D.VII shown is that of Ltn d R Erich Just of Jasta 11, also based at Bernes.

Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Aircraft of Jasta 10 prepare to taxi out for a dawn patrol, led by the fearless Leutnant Werner Voss in his Fokker F1 103/17 in September 1917. Arguments still rage concerning the colour of the engine cowling on his Triplane. Certainly, when the aircraft was delivered, its upper surfaces were painted factory finish streaked green and, it is recorded that it was flown as delivered with Voss personal mechanic noting that no extra painting was undertaken, aside from Voss Japanese kite face which occupied the nose.  However, research shows that by the time of Voss death on 23rd September 1917, after his epic battle with SE5s of 56 Sqn, the cowling was probably yellow in keeping with all Jasta 10 aircraft. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary abilities with his diminutive Triplane, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down by Lieutenant Rhys Davids on the very day that he was due to go on leave.  The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine, his aircraft not being fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Germanys greatest exponent of the Fokker Dr1 Triplane, Leutnant Josef Jacobs is depicted chatting with colleagues of Jasta 7 before a sortie in the spring of 1918.  His black Triplane became well known to allied pilots, not least because of his formidable kill rate.  By the end of the war, still aged just 24, Jacobs had claimed 48 enemy aircraft destroyed.  The unusual practice of applying the black cross to the upper sides of the lower wings was to counter friendly fire from other German aircraft who frequently mistook the Dr1 for a Sopwith Triplane.

Leutnant Josef Jacobs by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
Albatros DIII of Godwin Brumowski about to shoot down a Caquot balloon.

Oberleutnant Godwin Brumowski by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Latest Naval Art Releases

 In January 1941, the young Mario Arillo was appointed the rank of Lieutenant Commander, placed in charge of the Regia Marina's submarine <i>Ambra</i> and was dispatched to the Mediterranean to help disrupt supplies to the Allied forces.  In May of that same year, Arillo attacked the British Dido Class Cruiser <i>HMS Bonaventure</i>, and Destroyers <i>HMS Hereward</i> and <i>HMS Stuart</i>, south of Crete, en route from Alexandria, the cruiser <i>Bonaventure</i> being sunk with great loss of life.  The <i>Ambra</i> is depicted here in a calmer moment, two of her crew scanning the horizon for 'business'.

Hunter's Dusk by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two.  On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells.  The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.

Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Sitting menacingly at a depth of 15 metres below the surface, just 2 km outside the heavily defended harbour of Alexandria, the Italian submarine Scire is shown releasing her three manned torpedoes, or <i>Maiali</i>, at the outset of their daring raid in which the British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant and a tanker, were severely damaged on 3rd December 1941.  All six crew members of the three <i>Maiali</i> survived the mission, but all were captured and taken prisoner.  Luigi Durand de la Penne and Emilio Bianchi can be seen moving away aboard 221, whilst Vincenzo Martellotta and Mario Marino (222) carry out systems checks.  Antonio Marceglia and Spartaco Schergat, on 223, are heading away at the top of the picture.

Assault from the Deep by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 A Type VIIC U-Boat slips quietly toward the open sea from her pen at Lorient, France in 1942.

Dawn Departure by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

NEW POSTCARDS : 2016

 

A new range of postcards is currently being produced from a decade worth of our aviation, military and naval art publications.  It has been almost ten years since we last produced a range of postcards that have remained popular ever since.  Now we are producing new cards and the first 40 are now available to purchase

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO SEE THE CARDS!

 

FEATURED ARTIST

Neil Allen


Neil Allen was born in Leicester in 1971 . He was encouraged through his family to develop an interest in the Natural world and drawing. After following a career path in Architecture and dividing working in an Architects office with University study for some years he decided to return to education to study Art. He was offered a place on several courses, but chose Bournemouth and Poole college of Art and Design, and their Natural History Illustration course, because it offered the possibility to combine the study of Nature with Art. It was here that he gained permission to undertake his final year project "The wildlife of Spain", in Salamanca. The project was successfully completed and exhibited later in London. This enabled him to qualify with distinction. Upon leaving he worked as a free?lance Natural history Illustrator specialising in commercial projects and working for publishing houses. However through a process of evolution in his work and outlook he decided to concentrate wholly on painting. As a painter of wildlife for over a decade, his paintings have been exhibited widely in the U.K, in Spain and further a field in U.S.A. His enthusiasm and passion has taken him on research trips trekking in the jungles of Costa Rica, on Safari to the immensity of the Serengeti in Tanzania and to the vast Sahara desert, His originals are collected the world over.
Neil Allen

 

Dambusters Collection

Operation Chastise.  This exclusive range of Dambusters limited editions is without doubt the largest collection available, with many at special offer prices!

Click Here to see our Dambusters gallery.

 

D-Day Landings Collection

Fantastic range of military and aviation art depicting the D-Day landings on Utah, Juno, Gold, Sword and Omaha beaches of Normandy, in June 1944.

Click Here to see our D-Day gallery.

 

Pearl Harbor Collection

Our entire collection of Pearl Harbor prints in one place.

Click Here to see our Pearl Harbor gallery.

New Print Packs
Richard III and Battle of Bosworth Military Print Pack.
Battle

Battle of Bosworth by Brian Palmer.
Richard

Richard III by Chris Collingwood.
Save 175!
Nicolas Trudgian Railway Art Prints.
Spirit

Spirit of the Mountain by Nicolas Trudgian
Canyon

Canyon of Lost Souls by Nicolas Trudgian
Save 155!
Battle of Waterloo Napoleon and Wellington Military Prints.
The

The Battle of Waterloo by Robert Hillingford (B)
Napoleons

Napoleons Last Grand Attack by Ernest Crofts (B)
Save 45!
Spitfire Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
First

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (C)
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save 210!
Spitfire Print Pack by Nicolas Trudgian.
Winter
Winter of 41 by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save 230!

Links to more sections of our site : 

(These are the pages of our site which existed before our new shop system was installed.  The pages are updated automatically from our shop and so are kept up to date regularly, but the best place to see all our prints is in the shop itself.)

CHRIS COLLINGWOOD ] DAVID PENTLAND ] IVAN BERRYMAN ] RANDALL WILSON ] BRIAN PALMER ] ANTHONY SAUNDERS ] Nicolas Trudgian ] ROBERT TAYLOR ] Military Art Search ] BRIAN WOOD ] Listing by  Artist ] GRAEME LOTHIAN ] TIM FISHER ] SIMON SMITH ] Gerald Coulson ] Michael Rondot ] MARK CHURMS ] GEOFF LEA ] STUART LIPTROT ] JIM LANCIA ] ALAN HERRIET ] JOHN HOPKINS ] DEMOULIN ] GORDON WILSON ] ROBERT BARBOUR ] RICHARD TAYLOR ] John D Shaw ] NEW RELEASES ] ANTIQUE MILITARY ] Military  Paperweights ]

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