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One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
Military and aviation arist David Pentland.  His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Military and aviation arist David Pentland. His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
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Gathering of the Eagles by Clyde Heron. Historical American Civil art print of General Lee shown with confederate General Joseph E Johnson, Stonewall Jackson before Fredericksburg.

Gathering of Eagles by Clyde Heron.  

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Text for the above print as shown on the certificate:

Mr. Lincoln's "Prince of Procrastination," General George McClellan, had finally been prodded into action. On March 17th, 1862, one day ahead of the deadline imposed by the President, the first of McClellan's divisions embarked at Alexandria. "The worst is over," the general assured his superiors by letter. "Rely upon it that I will carry this thing through handsomely."

His optimism was short-lived. McClellan's peninsula campaign did not go nearly as smoothly as he had anticipated. It was May 24th before his forces occupied the village of Mechanicsville, still some five miles from Richmond. Here his progress was stalled because the Chickahominy River was on the rise and he had to put his men to work building no fewer than eleven bridges across the river in a twelve mile stretch south to Bottom's bridge. Then to add to his problems, he received word that General McDowell's 40,000 men would not be at his disposal as had been the plan.

Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston learned that McDowell was returning to Fredericksburg on the night of May 23rd, a move he knew he had precipitated by an event at Front Royal on May 23rd. A surprise attack by Stonewall Jackson upon General Nathanial Banks had set his main army to flight, half destroyed his wagon train, and in a full scale battle at Winchester, put the Federals into panic.

Now that Johnston did not have to worry about McDowell, he would attack the Federals south of the Chickahominy and overwhelm their left wing before it could be reinforced from across the river. The battle of Seven Pines began at 1.00pm on May 31st, when D. H. Hills division launched a massive attack, overrunning Casey's Federal troops. The battle raged on until dusk and Johnston concluded that the battle would have to continue the next day.

At about 7.00pm he rode toward the front with his young orderly and a staff colonel, seeing to the disposition of his troops. As he neared the edge of the battlefield, Johnston saw the officer duck his head as an enemy shell whistled by, Johnston smiled and said, "Colonel there is no use of dodging, when you hear them they have passed." Just then a Federal musket ball struck Johnston in the right shoulder. A moment later a heavy fragment of shell slammed into the general's chest, knocking him to the ground unconscious.

President Jefferson Davis and General Robert E. Lee greeted Johnston as he was moved to the rear. The severely wounded general had regained consciousness but was growing weaker and was taken from the field.

Davis pressed General Gustavus Smith, the ranking officer, for his plans since he would logically inherit command. Smith's hesitant replies did not suit Davis, and his mention of pulling back even closer to Richmond was unacceptable.

No one was near Lee and Davis as they rode slowly through the swarm of vehicles carrying the wounded into Richmond - not close enough to hear Davis' words which placed Lee in command; however, his most devoted biographer was to render them: "General Lee, I shall assign you to the command of this army. Make your preparations as soon as you reach your quarters. I shall send you the order when you get to Richmond."

Major Generals James Longstreet, A.P. Hill and D.H. Hill were already engaged in the theatre of operations, but before calling these commanders to council, Lee would add one more name to the list. He sent insistent dispatches to Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson urging him to hurry to Richmond. Lee put the order gently, "If you agree," but the compelling haste was clear in every line. Jackson was to conceal his movements and come as swiftly as possible to the capital. It was an order to delight Jackson; he might have written it himself.

At almost the same moment Jackson read Lee's order, General Banks was telegraphing Washington that Old Jack was advancing on him in overwhelming force. Jackson's answer to Lee's summons was not to be an easy task, a fifty-two mile ride in fourteen hours.

It was Sunday, June 27th, and Jackson chose to delay the start of his journey until 1.00am so that he would not break the Sabbath. It would be mid-afternoon before he arrived at Lee's headquarters in the Dabb's farmhouse near Richmond. He found Lee at work and waited for him in the yard, D.H. Hill arrived and was most surprised to find his newly-famous brother-in-law present for the meeting, since he had only yesterday been far down the valley confronting Banks. Yet there he was.

Things were bad, the barbed-tongued Hill told Jackson. His forces were being crushed by McClellan's huge army. There was little food, scarce supplies, and even their cannon were untrustworthy.

Jackson made little reply to his outspoken friend as they went inside. They were soon joined by Longstreet and H.P. Hill. Longstreet, a Union captain when the war came, was squat, stubborn, and becoming deaf at the age of 41. Red-haired A.P. Hill was hot-tempered, but brilliant and had yet to be tested in the field.

Lee began to explain the plan of assault on the Yankees. It was a bold plan, born of desperation in an effort to stave off a siege of Richmond. Lee was but 55. He had held command for just three weeks and had fought no battle beyond giving direction in the final hours of the inconclusive action at Seven Pines. Although there was a gentle authority in his voice, his manner of offering his plan bordered on humility. He spoke as became the man who had lately written on taken command from the wounded Johnston, "I wish his mantle had fallen on an abler man, or that I were able to drive our enemies back to their homes. I have no ambition and no desire to but the attainment of this object, and therefore only wish for its accomplishment by him that can do it most speedily and thoroughly."

Within the next four days, 85,000 Confederates faced 105,000 Bluecoats and emerged triumphant. Union General George McClellan not only lost men and supplies, he lost the initiative. Lee had his first victory. 

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

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As the Allied invasion of northern France drew nearer, the entire length of southern England had seemingly become one huge army camp. While the local population went about its daily business as best it could, British and American troops massed at every point near the coast in readiness for the imminent crossing of the Channel. Though the RAF fighters of 10 Group were tasked in the Air Defense role, like all RAF squadrons that could be spared, they became involved with the softening up process, a pre-requisite of any large scale landing on enemy occupied territory. Under the leadership of Wing Commander Peter Brothers, 10 Groups Spitfire Wing based at Culmhead was heavily involved flying shipping patrols over the beachhead and Rhubarbs - low-level strikes of opportunity - disrupting enemy movements and communications.Nicolas Trudgians comprehensive painting Summer of 44 recreates with such realism a scene in southwest England just a few days before the Normandy landings in June 1944. Mark IX Spitfires of No. 126 Squadron, returning from combat over France, sweeps low over the local branch line railway station on their way back to Culmhead. Below, as the GWR Prairie tank engine pulls out of the station, American troops are assembling their equipment in readiness for the impending invasion. Adding great atmosphere to his composition, Nick has painted a classically peaceful English landscape, highlighting the unique contrast between war and peace that pervaded Britain during that summer of 44.  <br><br><b>Published 2000.<br><br>Signed by two of the most outstanding Spitfire Wing Leaders of World War II.</b>

Summer of 44 by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £110.00
On 11th September 1944, Urban <i>Ben</i> Drew claimed his third aerial victory claiming another Me109 in his P-51 Mustang.

Urban 'Ben' Drew - Aerial Hat-Trick by Brian Bateman. (P)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941. the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945.

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (E)
Half Price! - £95.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00

 It is January 1945, and its cold. The German advance in the Ardennes is nearly over, but the Panzer Army is desperately throwing more troops into the breach who try to keep their momentum going in The Battle of the Bulge. Tasked with preventing German reinforcements from reaching the battle front, the Ninth Air Force launched a series of low-level attacks on enemy ground forces as they wind their way through the Ardennes. Flying conditions were not easy, cloud bases were low, and snow was in the air. Nicolas Trudgians new painting recreates an attack on January 23, 1945, by Douglas A-20 Havocs of the 410th Bomb Group. Locating an enemy convoy in open space near the German town of Blankenheim, the Havoc pilots make a swift attack diving from 8000 feet, catching the German force by surprise: Hurtling down the line of vehicles at 320mph they release their parafrag bombs from 300 feet then, dropping just above the roofs of the army trucks continue down the column blasting everything in sight with their forward-firing .50mm caliber machine guns. In the space of a few minutes the attack is completed and the convoy decimated. With ammunition expended and fuel running low the A-20 Havocs climb out of the zone and head for base in France. A 20mm shell has hit the lead aircraft wounding the Bombardier/Navigator Gordon Jones, which will seriously hamper their return through a blizzard, but all aircraft make it safely home - the lead aircraft, on landing, counting over 100 holes of various sizes. For their part in leading the successful attack the Lead Pilot Russell Fellers and Bombardier/Navigator Gordon G. Jones received the Silver Star. <br><br><b>Published 2001.<br><br>Signed by A-20 Havoc combat aircrews, including two Silver Star recipients, from World War Two.</b>

Raising Havoc in the Ardennes by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £125.00
 Shortly after 2pm on Friday 24th October 2003, supersonic commercial aviation was brought to a close as three British Airways Concordes touched down within minutes of each other at London Heathrow Airport for the last time.  Here BA Captain Mike Bannister brings G BOAG down for her final touchdown.

Concorde - The Final Touchdown by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2500.00
 Two Fairey Firefly fighter-bombers of 810 Sqn, Fleet Air Arm, overfly the carrier HMS Theseus during the Korean War.

HMS Theseus by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 B-17G 42-37755 NV-A 325th Bomb Squadron, 92nd Bomb Group from Poddington crash landing in Switzerland on 25th February 1944 after sustaining damage over enemy territory after a raid on Augsburg and Stuttgart.

Safe Pastures by Mark Postlethwaite. (Y)
Half Price! - £45.00

NAVAL PRINTS

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B216AP.  HMS Colossus by Ivan Berryman.  Together with her sister ship, Hercules, HMS Colossus acquitted herself well at the Battle of Jutland where she fired 93 12in rounds, but received only two hits from enemy fire which caused minor damage and left nine crew injured.  She was sold for scrap in 1928.

HMS Colossus by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 The mighty Bismarck returns fire to the fast-approaching HMS Hood a the start of a battle that would see both adversaries tragically sunk.

Bismarck Replies to HMS Hood by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 To increase the strength of the US fleet in the Pacific during the critical early months of the war, USS Indiana went through the Panama Canal. On the 28th of November 1942 USS Indiana joined Rear Admiral Lee's aircraft carrier screening force. For the next 11 months, USS Indiana helped protect USS Enterprise and USS Saratoga, which had been supporting the US invasion on the Solomon Islands. On the 21st of October 1943 USS Indiana went to Pearl Harbor, but after only a couple of weeks left to support forces designated for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. The battleship protected the carriers which supported the Marines during the bloody fight for Tarawa atoll. Then, in late January 1944, she bombarded Kwajalein for eight days prior to the Marshall Island landings on 1st February 1944. USS Indiana collided with the battleship USS Washington while refuelling destroyers, killing several men. Temporary repairs to her starboard side were made at Majuro and USS Indiana returned to Pearl Harbor on 13th February 1944 for additional repair work. The painting shows USS Indiana with one of the two carriers she protected.

USS Indiana, First Tour of Duty by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
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The King George V class battleship HMS Anson is pictured in Sydney Harbour where she joined the Pacific Fleet in July 1945, viewed across the flight deck of HMS Vengeance, where ten of her Vought F4.U Corsairs are ranged in front of a single folded Fairey Barracuda
HMS Anson at Sydney Harbour, July 1945 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00

HMS Eagle and the commando carrier HMS Albion during the withdrawal from Aden in November 1967.  One of HMS Eagles Sea Vixen is passing overhead and RFA Stromness is at anchor in the distance.

HMS Eagle and HMS Albion by Ivan Berryman.
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With the British Mediterranean Fleet riding at anchor in Grand  Harbour Malta, HMS  Majestic is shown preparing to leave harbour as local fisherman look on. 

Majestic Malta by Randall Wilson.
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 Just seconds from opening fire with a broadside that will devastate her opponent, HMS Victory prepares to pass the stern of the French flagship Bucentaure, closely followed by the three-deckers HMS Temeraire and HMS Neptune. With guns unable to bear on the enemy fleet during the slow approach the British ships had endured terrible punishment with Victorys sails holed, her wheel smashed and her mizzen top shot away.

Breaking the Line by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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  The heavy cruiser HMS Dorsetshire is brought up to sink the blazing wreck of the Bismarck with torpedoes at around 10:30 hours on the morning of May 27th 1941.  The once proud German ship had been ruthlessly pounded into a twisted and burning wreck by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori combed the area of the sinking for survivors, between them picking up a total of 110 out of an original complement of 2,300.

HMS Dorsetshire by Ivan Berryman (P)
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WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

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 Oberssturmbannfuhrer Jochim Peiper, commander of the armoured spearhead of 1st SS Panzer Division, in conference with some of the officers of other units under his command. Aside form men and tanks of his own division, these included King tigers of the 501st heavy tank battalion and paratroops of 1st battalion, 9th Fallschrimjager regiment.

Kampfgruppe Peiper by David Pentland. (E)
Half Price! - £115.00
 A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Müncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th april 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
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 St Mere Eglise, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  U.S. Paratroops of the 82nd <i>All American</i> Airborne Division, descend on occupied France.

First to Fight by David Pentland.
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 Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe. No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (Y)
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CC089. Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.

Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £900.00
 Oberfeldwebel Albert Kerscher, commander of 2nd company 511 Heavy Tank Battalion aided by a Panzer IV, two Hetzers, a Kingtiger and a Pak gun, successfully defended against concerted Soviet air and armoured attacks, his action buying valuable time for the evacuation of German wounded from Pilau and scoring his 100th victory in the process.

Kerschers Defence of Neuhauser Forest by David Pentland. (AP)
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 Kursk, Russia, July, 1943. T-70 light tanks of 2nd Tank Army on a reconnaissance patrol near Ponyri-Goreloje.

Looking for Trouble by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 General Major Erwin Rommel leads the vanguard of his vaunted 7th Panzer (Ghost) Division past an abandoned French Char B tank on its epic drive from the Ardennes to the English Channel.

Blitzkrieg, Northern France, May 1940 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £50.00

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