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Me110

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Manufacturer : Messerschmitt
Number Built :
Production Began : 1938
Retired :
Type :

The Bf-110 grew out of Herman Gorings specifications for a multipurpose aircraft capable of penetrating deep into enemy airspace to clear the sky of enemy fighters in advance of German bomber formations. The aircraft would also be utilized as a long range interceptor, and as a ground support and ground attack bomber. The Bf-110 prototype first flew in 1936. The prototype was under powered with its Daimier Benz DB 600A engines. Several months passed before a go ahead was given for large scale production which commenced in 1938. Utilizing improved DB 601 engines, the early production 110s were as fast as any single engine fighter at that time, and had superior fire power. Their biggest apparent weakness was in the areas of armor protection for the crew, and in terms of maneuverability when compared to single seat fighters. The 110 was produced in large numbers and in many different variants. The 110D was the long range model. An additional belly tank was fitted to that aircraft, with several later variants having the more traditional drop tanks. The first serious test for the Bf-110 came during the Battle of Britain. About 300 Bf-110s were involved. They became easy prey for Hurricane and Spitfire pilots, and Bf-109s were often required to assist the 110s in their own defense. On August 15, 1940, which became known as Black Tuesday, the Bf-110s were ravaged by the RAF, and for the month over 100 aircraft were lost. On the Eastern Front the Bf-110 performed admirably in the early stages of Operation Barbarossa. With the Soviet Air Force weakened in the first several weeks of the attack, 110s were effectively utilized in a ground attack role. Ultimately, the Luftwaffe re-equipped a significant number of its 110s as night fighters. The aircraft performed well in this role because it was a good gun platform with sufficient speed to overtake the RAF night bombers. Such night missions were typically carried out with no Allied fighter escort, so the 110 night fighters would not have to engage or elude Allied fighters in this role.

Me110


Latest Me110 Artwork Releases !
 Flying as Leader of B Flight, 41 Sqn, on 15th August 1940, Pilot Officer Ted Shipman and the rest of his flight found themselves among a mass of Messerschmitt Bf.110s that had been detailed to escort a bomber force of Heinkel He111s on a raid on the North of England.  Having made one head-on attack on one of the Bf.110s, Shipman manoeuvred his Spitfire Mk.1 onto the tail of another and fired a long burst into it.  This was M8+CH of Oberleutnant Hans-Ulrich Kettling of 1./ZG76 and rear Gunner / Radio Operator O/ Gefr Volk, whose starboard engine burst into flames and disappeared into the dense cloudbase.  Shipman claimed this initially as a probable, but it was later confirmed as a victory when the aircraft was found to have crash landed at Streatham Nr Barnard Castle.  Spitfire K9805 (EB-L) is depicted breaking off the attack as Kettling's stricken Bf.110 begins to burn.  Ted Shipman would go on to serve with the Royal Air Force until December 1959 retiring as a Wing Commander.  Ted would also go onto become friends with  Hans-Ulrich Kettling, the pilot he shot down.

Tribute to Pilot Officer Ted Shipman by Ivan Berryman.
 On the night of 12th September 1944, Lancaster NF958 (LS-M) of No.15 Sqn was lost in the skies above Mannheim when it was attacked by the Messerschmitt Bf.110G-2 of Ofw Ludwig Schmidt of II/NJG 6, the bomber receiving hits to the bomb bay which ignited the incendiaries still in their racks.  Five of the crew bailed out and were taken prisoner of war once captured.  The pilot, F/O Norman Overend RNZAF, did not escape the aircraft.  Flt Sgt Harry A Beverton was seen to leave the stricken Lancaster but was not seen again.<br><br><b>Crew of <i>Lancaster LS-M</i> :</b><br><br>F/O Norman Overend RNZAF<br>Sgt Barry J Howarth <i>(survived)</i><br>Sgt George B Thomson <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt John D Jones <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt Robert P E Kendall <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt Harry A Beverton<br>Sgt I Spagatner <i>(survived)</i>.

Incident over Mannheim by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Outnumbered and outclassed, the aging Gloster Gladiators of 112 Sqn nonetheless put up a spirited defence in the skies above Crete as Germanys Operation Mercury gathered momentum in the Spring of 1941.  Here, shark-mouthed Messerschmitt Bf.110s of ZG.76 menace a lone Gladiator during an evening encounter.

Impossible Odds by Ivan Berryman.
 Whilst flying with A Flight of 85 Squadron on 30th July 1940, Geoffrey Allard encountered a pair of Messerschmitt Bf.110s about 40 miles from the coast, apparently patrolling near a convoy.  After Squadron Leader Townsend, flying  Red 1, had made two unsuccessful attacks, Allard closed to 150 yards and began to fire continuously, eventually closing to just 25 yards, whereupon the starboard engine of the Bf.110 began to disintegrate. This was just one of eight victories that Allard claimed during the Battle of Britain to add to a previous eight that he had scored flying Hurricanes during the Battle of France.

Close Combat by Ivan Berryman.

Me110 Artwork Collection



Night Defender by Graeme Lothian. (P)


Night of Defiance by Ivan Berryman.


Messerschmitt Bf.110G4b/R3 by Ivan Berryman.


Incident over Mannheim by Ivan Berryman.


Tribute to Pilot Officer Ted Shipman by Ivan Berryman.


Dawn Strike by Richard Taylor.


Close Combat by Ivan Berryman.


Impossible Odds by Ivan Berryman.


Into The Cloak of Darkness by Nicolas Trudgian


Duel in the Dark by Robert Taylor.

Night Hawks by Philip West.


One - Tens Over Kent by Nicolas Trudgian

Operation Mercury by Nicolas Trudgian.


Opening Gambit, Poland, 2nd September 1939 by David Pentland.


Night Ghost of St Trond by Iain Wyllie.


Night Hunters of the Reich by Nicolas Trudgian.

Messerschmitt Bf110 Zerstorer Aces of World War Two.

Lancaster Under Attack by Robert Taylor.


Top Night Fighter by Stan Stokes.

Top Aces for : Me110
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Theodor Weissenberger209.00
Max-Hellmuth Ostermann102.00The signature of Max-Hellmuth Ostermann features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Hans-Ekkehard Bob60.00The signature of Hans-Ekkehard Bob features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Paul Zorner59.00The signature of Paul Zorner features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Martin Drewes52.00The signature of Martin Drewes features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Werner Hoffmann52.00The signature of Werner Hoffmann features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Hans-Joachim Jabs50.00The signature of Hans-Joachim Jabs features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Peter Spoden26.00The signature of Peter Spoden features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Wolfgang Schenck18.00The signature of Wolfgang Schenck features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Otto Fries18.00The signature of Otto Fries features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Ludwig Schmidt16.00
Wolfgang Falck8.00The signature of Wolfgang Falck features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Rolf Ebhardt8.00The signature of Rolf Ebhardt features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Alfred Ambs7.00The signature of Alfred Ambs features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Squadrons for : Me110
A list of all squadrons from known to have used this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

JG132

Country : Germany
Founded : 1st April 1936
Fate : Became Stab./JG26 on 1st May 1939.
'Richthofen'

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JG132

Formed 1st April 1936 in Döberitz. Until 1st November 1938, JG132 carried the traditional name Richthofen. On 1st November 1938 redesignated Stab/JG131. Reformed 1st November 1938 in Düsseldorf. On 1st May 1939 redesignated Stab/JG26. From 1st April 1936, the squadron flew He51s and Bf109s (B and D) from Döberitz. From 1st November 1938 to 1st May 1939 the squadron flew Bf109 (D and E) from Düsseldorf.

JG334

Country : Germany

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JG334

Full profile not yet available.

JG5

Country : Germany

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JG5

Eismeer was a Luftwaffe fighter Wing that served during World War II. As the name Eismeer (Ice Sea) implies, it was created to operate in the far North of Europe, namely Norway, Scandinavia and northern parts of Finland, all nearest the Arctic Ocean. Just over two dozen fighter aircraft that once served with JG 5 during the war still survive in the 21st century, more than from any other combat wing of any of the Axis air forces of World War II.

JG77

Country : Germany
Founded : May 1939
'Ace of Hearts'

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JG77

Herz As (Ace of Hearts) was a Luftwaffe fighter wing during World War II. It served in all the German theaters of war, from Western Europe to the Eastern Front, and from the high north in Norway to the Mediterranean.

JG 77 was formed in May 1939 with I. and II. Gruppe. III./JG 77 was formed on 5 July 1940 in Trondheim from the II(J)./JG 186. I./ JG 77 was reorganized on 21 November 1940 into IV./JG 51 and a new I./JG 77 was established. In January 1942 I./JG 77 was transferred to I./JG 5 and a new I./JG 77 was created.

In April 1942 1. Staffel was transferred to Romania and designated the defence unit for the Ploie?ti oil fields at Mizil. (This staffel was redesignated 1./JG 4 in August 1942.)

NJG1

Country : Germany

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NJG1

Full profile not yet available.

NJG3

Country : Germany

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NJG3

Full profile not yet available.

NJG6

Country : Germany

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NJG6

Full profile not yet available.

ZG1

Country : Germany

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ZG1

Full profile not yet available.

ZG26

Country : Germany

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ZG26

Full profile not yet available.

ZG52

Country : Germany

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ZG52

Full profile not yet available.

ZG76

Country : Germany

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ZG76

Zerstörergeschwader 76 was formed on 1 May 1939 with the I. Gruppe and II. Gruppe without a Geschwaderstab. The II. Gruppe was initially equipped with the Messerschmitt Bf 109 and was known as Jagdgruppe 176. The Geschwaderstab was created on 15 April 1940 in Köln-Wahn. The III. Gruppe was raised on 26 June 1940 in Trier-Euren.

On 1 September 1939 Germany attacked Poland although bad weather initially precluded a large scale deployment of ZG 76. I./ZG 76 engaged Polish fighters formations and made their first claims, although also suffered their first losses. Future 'ace' Leutnant Helmut Lent participated in the attack on Poland, destroying several aircraft on the ground and a PZL P.11 fighter in the air on 2 September 1939 for his and (I./ZG 76) first victory. However, on 12 September, following the destruction of an aircraft on the ground he was attacked by another fighter and his starboard engine was hit and put out of action. This necessitated a forced-landing, fortunately behind his own lines, in which he received minor injuries.

On 29 September, I./ZG 76 was withdrawn to the Stuttgart area to provide Reichsverteidigung (Defense of the Reich) against the Western Allied Air Forces. I./ZG 76 claimed 31 kills during the campaign, of which 19 were confirmed.

On 18 December 1939 the Royal Air Force sent a force of Vickers Wellingtons to raid Wilhelmshafen during the day. I./ZG 76 under Hptm. Gunther Reinecke, intercepted. Staffelkapitän of 2./ZG 76, Wolfgang Falck, and wingman Uffz. Heinz Fresia were the first to engage, claiming two Wellingtons each, though Falck's aircraft was hit by defending fire and he crash-landed on Wangerooge. Others of I./ZG 76 intercepted at intervals, unit claims totalling 15 Wellingtons shot down. The RAF lost 12, with total Luftwaffe unconfirmed claims being 38
Signatures for : Me110
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Leutnant Alfred Ambs
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30 / 3 / 2010Died : 30 / 3 / 2010
30 / 3 / 2010Ace : 7.00 Victories
Leutnant Alfred Ambs

Born in Gladbeck on the 23rd January 1923, Alfred Ambs joined the Luftwaffe on the 10th July 1942. Initiqally attached to a training unit, he flew Ju88s, Me110s, Me109 and Fw190 aircraft. He was in the following units : Flg.Rgt. 53, Luftkriegsschule 3, Flugzeugführerschule C14 in Prague. Flugzeugführerschule B33 (Prague-Rusin), and Zerstörergeschwader 101. As the war situation worsened, Ambs was transferred to train on the new Messerschmitt 262 fighter with JG7 in Lechfeld. Flying with this unit, Ambs shot down 6 Allied aircraft to finish the war an Me 262 jet Ace. He flew his last mission on 23rd March 1945, and had flown a total of nearly 75 missions on the Me262. Sadly, Alfred Ambs passed away on 30th March 2010.



Oberfeldwebel Erich Axthammer
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Oberfeldwebel Erich Axthammer

Born 3rd December 1920, he joined the Luftwaffe in November 1938, learning to fly on Me109s and Me110s. He was posted to the eastern front flying the Hs123. In March 1943, he joined SG1, again on the eastern front, flying over 300 missions with the Hs123. He then served with 1./SG152, 5./SG77 and later 8./SG10 from August 1944. After 505 missions he was awarded the Knights Cross on 28th April 1945. He also flew the Fw190. In a final total of 530 missions, 305 of which were on the Hs123, he destroyed many ground targets, including armoured vehicles, supply vehicles and flak guns. After the war he became a miner, but rejoined the Bundesluftwaffe in 1958, as a carrier and helicopter pilot, retiring in 1979.




Major Hans-Ekkehard Bob
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30 / 3 / 2010Ace : 60.00 Victories
Major Hans-Ekkehard Bob

After success in the Battle of Britain, Hans-Ekkehard Bob took over leadership of 9./JG54 in 1940. The following year he was awarded the Knights Cross. Transferring to the Eastern Front his victories rose steadily to 50 by September 1942. His Group later transferred back to the West for a short period, where in April 1943, he rammed a B-17 Fortress. Returning to the Eastern Front as Kommander of IV./JG3, he ended the war as Adjutant of Gallands JV44 in the West. In his 700 missions he scored 60 victories.

Hans-Ekkehard Bob signing the print - JV44 Kette of Swallows - by Graeme Lothian.



Feldwebel Adolf Denz
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Feldwebel Adolf Denz

Adolf Denz flew Me110 Tankbusters with their huge 37mfin anti-tank guns on the Russian Front with much success. Returning to the West with ZG76, on 14 Oct flew Me110s in defence of Schweinfirt.



Major Martin Drewes
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30 / 3 / 2010Ace : 52.00 Victories
Major Martin Drewes

One of the great Luftwaffe night fighter pilots; between 1941-45 he completed 235 combat missions flying the Me110, and with 52 aerial victories was one of the highest scoring night fighter Aces. After serving as a Destroyer pilot with II./ZG76, he was posted to Iraq, where he shot down a Gloster Gladiator, before transferring to night fighters. In March 1944 he was promoted to Kommandeur III./NJG1, a post he held until the end of the war. Martin Drewes flew total of 235 missions, and was awarded the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves.



Oberleutnant Rolf Ebhardt
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30 / 3 / 2010Ace : 8.00 Victories
Oberleutnant Rolf Ebhardt

Joined Luftwaffe in December 1941 and began flight training at Dresden in February 1942. Joined NJG 101 in December 1942 (night training unit) where he completed his specialist training. (In training flew Ju52, He111, Ju88, Do217 and Me109) As a newly promoted Leutnant he joined III/NJG 1 in Holland on 1st November 1943 and achieved his first night time victory on 26 April 1944. By the time of his eighth and last victory on 5 January 1945 he had flown 82 operations and been awarded the Iron Cross First and Second Class. All his ops were flown in Me110s.




Oberst Wolfgang Falck
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13 / 3 / 2007Died : 13 / 3 / 2007
13 / 3 / 2007Ace : 8.00 Victories
Oberst Wolfgang Falck

At the outbreak of war Wolfgang Falck was Staffelkapitan of 8,/JG132 flying the Bf110 Zerstorer in the Polish Campaign. In Feb 1940 he became Kommandeur 1./ZG1 and led it during the Western campaign. From June 1940 Falck was appointed Kommodore NJG1, the largest Geschwader in the Luftwaffe. During this time the greatest Luftwaffe night Aces were under his command. In July 1943 he joined the staff of Luftflotte Recih where he was responsible for the day and night fighter defence of the Reich. In the autumn of 1944 he was made Fighter Leader in the Balkans, and later became head of staff for flying training. Wolfgang Falck flew 90 operations and was awarded the Knight's Cross. Died 13th March 2007.

Wolfgang Falck with his wife - photograph taken c.2007 at his home in Austria.




Leutnant Otto Fries
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13 / 3 / 2007Ace : 18.00 Victories
Leutnant Otto Fries

Otto Fries was posted to NJG I nightfighter unit in January 1942 as a Gefreiter. He served with them on the Western Front right through until the end of the war, flying continuously against RAF Bomber Command. He was commissioned Leutnant in August 1943. In July 1944 Otto was flying Me110s of II.Gruppe based in St. Trond, St. Dizier and then Arnheim. He later joined I.Gruppe before transferring to Münster-Hansdorf flying the Heinkel 219 Owl. He is one of the last surviving He219 pilots. Shot down four times, on the second of which he escaped by catapult ejection seat out of the He219 during night operations for home defence - it is thought had been shot down by night fighter Mosquito R of 85 Sqd flown by F/Lt Vaughan and F/Sgt R D McKinnon. The right hand engine of his He219 suddenly exploded into flames. With the loss of most of the control of the aircraft he jettisoned the aircrafts canopy, his wireless operator Feldwebel Alfred Staffa baled out and was severley wounded on landing with his parachute. Lt Otto Fries could not regain sufficient control of the He219 which was now burning so he ejected. He landed unhurt by means of his parachute. The He219 crashed about 3 kilometres south of Hertogenbosch and was destroyed. This was only the third such ejection in combat in the world. Otto scored 18 air victories by the end of the war.

Otto Fries signing artwork of Graeme Lothian.




Major Werner Hoffmann
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8 / 7 / 2011Died : 8 / 7 / 2011
8 / 7 / 2011Ace : 52.00 Victories
Major Werner Hoffmann

Born in 1918, Werner Hoffman began flying gliders in 1932 before joining the Luftwaffe in 1936, being awarded his pilots bagde in June 1938. A month later, he was with 7./JG234 which, at the beginning of May 1939, became one of the first Destroyer units, I./ZG52. He was assigned to 4./ZG2 and took part in the Battle of France, scoring his first victory, a Spitfire, over Dunkirk. After being wounded, he served as a Staffelkapitan with Erganzungs Zerstorer Gruppe in Denmark, before retraining as a night fighter. Becoming Staffelkpitan of 5./NJG3, he took part in the Channel Dash operations. Hoffmann claimed two twin engine RAF bombers during the 1,000 bomber raid on the night of 25th - 26th June 1942, his first victories at night. In July 1943 he was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of I./NJG5. By the end of 1943, his victory total had increased to 18, but on 20th January 1944 his aircraft was damaged by a Lancaster bomber and he was forced to bale out. At the end of January 1944, he shot down three Halifaxes one night, followed by two Lancasters the following night. With further victories over four-engined bombers at night, his tally grew until the night of 16th - 17th March 1945, when his Ju88 was shot down by a Mosquito night fighter, thought to have been the 239 Sqn Mosquito of British Ace Dennis Hughes. He flew almost 200 missions, scoring 51 night and 1 day victories. Awarded the Knight's Cross in 1943, he was nominated for the Oak Leaves. Werner Hoffman passed away on 8th July 2011.




Oberstleutnant Hans-Joachim Jabs
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23 / 10 / 2003Died : 23 / 10 / 2003
23 / 10 / 2003Ace : 50.00 Victories
Oberstleutnant Hans-Joachim Jabs

After seeing combat as a pilot in Czechoslovakia and the great air battles over France and Belgium, Hans-Joachim Jabs flew the Messerschmitt Me110 Zerstorer throughout the Battle of Britain with II./ZG76 Sharks Gruppe. During this time he shot down eight Spitfires and four Hurricanes and was awarded the Knights Cross in October 1940. Hans-Joachim Jabs retrained as a night fighter pilot, briefly returning to daylight operations to escort the German capital ships on the famous Channel Dash. He became Kommandeur of IV./NJG1, and from March 1944, Kommodore. He was awarded Oak Leaves to the Knights Cross in March 1944. In April 1944 he acheived two remarkable day victories, both over Spitfires. Hans-Joachim Jabs flew 710 missions and scored 22 day and 28 night victories. Born 14th November 1917, died 26th October 2003. Born in Lubeck Germany in 1917, Han-Joachim Jabs, one of the highest scoring Bf- 110 aces to survive the War, joined the Luftwaffe in late 1936. He was originally trained as a Bf-109 pilot, but in March of 1940 he was transferred to ZG-76 which flew the Bf- 110, twin-engine fighter. Jabs honed his fighter pilot skills during the Battle of France, during which he downed four French fighters and two Spitfires, making him an ace. As the Battle of Britain commenced, most Bf-110s were initially assigned the role of escort for German bombers. Pitted against large numbers of Hurricanes and Spitfires flown by well-trained pilots of the RAF, many of these Zerstorer pilots would not survive the Battle of Britain. Hans-Joachim Jabs was an exception. He was one of the few German Bf-110 aces to attain numerous victories against Hurricanes and Spitfires during the Battle of Britain, during which he downed eight Spitfires and four Hurricanes. Downing the superior-performing Spitfires and Hurricanes in the twin-engine Bf-110 was considered by fellow Zerstorer pilots as the ultimate achievement of a fighter pilot. However, by mid 1941 it was very clear that the Bf-110 needed to be withdrawn from front-line daytime fighter service. Many 110s were retrofitted for the night fighter role, where the aircraft would not encounter fighter opposition. Jabs was retrained in late 1941, and he joined NJG-3 in the defense of Hamburg from the RAF night bombing attacks. He did participate in a daylight mission to provide air cover for the famed Channel Dash of the Prinz Eugen and several other capital ships. Jabs had few good scoring opportunities until he was transferred to NJG-1 operating in Holland. This unit was equipped with a later variant of the 110 with better radar and with heavier armament. Jabs night fighter score began to mount, with most of his victims being RAF bombers. By January of 1944 he had attained a total of 44 victories. He was promoted to Kommodore of NJG-1, but continued to fly missions with the men under his command. Major Heinz Schnaufer, the top-scoring night fighter ace of all-time, with 121 victories, served for a while under Jabs' command. While preparing to return from a mission on April 29, 1944, Jabs' 110 was jumped by several Spitfires. Turning into the enemy and firing with his long range cannons, Jabs bagged one the Spitfires, and temporarily sent the others scurrying. The Spitfires regrouped and once again Jabs turned into them and downed one of his pursuers. The ace's 110 had taken quite a few hits and Jabs now desperately tried to return to his base. He was able to land the badly shot-up aircraft and seek cover before the remaining Spitfires strafed his Zerstorer into a burning piece of rubble. Jabs' final victories came on the night of February 21, 1945, when he downed two Lancasters. Jabs total of fifty aerial victories, which included twenty-two daytime victories and twenty-eight night fighter victories were all attained in the Bf-110. Following the end of the War, Jabs began a new life as a businessman and public servant. Jabs married in 1940 and has two sons. He died 23th October 2003.



Max-Hellmuth Ostermann
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9 / 8 / 1942Died : 9 / 8 / 1942
9 / 8 / 1942Ace : 102.00 Victories
Max-Hellmuth Ostermann

Born in Hamburg on 11th December 1917, Max-Hellmuth Ostermann joined the Luftwaffe in March 1937. He flew Me110s with I./ZG1, participating in the invasion of Poland before transferring to JG21 in April 1940. During the Battle of France, he claimed his first victory, shooting down a French fighter on 20th May 1940. He claimed one more victory during the French campaign before the squadron was redesignated JG54 and fought in the Battle of Britain, where Ostermann claimed a further 6 victories. Participating in the Balkans campaign, he shot down a Yugoslavian Me109 fighter, before moving to fight the Russians on the eatern front. With 29 victories claimed, he was awarded the Knights Cross on 4th September 1941. He scored his 50th victory on 20th January 1942, increasing his total to 70 by the 20th of March that year. Early in May, after scoring his 97th victory, Ostermann was shot down but was unharmed. Returning to action, he scored his 100th victory on 12th May 1942, and was the 7th pilot to score this total. He was shot down on the same mission, suffering sufficient wounds to keep him out of action until August. On 9th August 1942, he scored his 102nd victory, but was shot down and killed by Russian fighters soon afterwards.



Major Wolfgang Schenck
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5 / 3 / 2010Died : 5 / 3 / 2010
5 / 3 / 2010Ace : 18.00 Victories
Major Wolfgang Schenck

Born 7th February 1913, Wolfgang Schenck joined the Luftwaffe in 1936. After training he was assigned to JG132 flying Me109s before the squadron was renamed ZG1 and converted to Me110s. He took part in operations against Poland, Norway and France but was hospitalised for three months after being wounded. After recovering, he joined EG210, an experimental squadron, to develop fighter bomber tactics. Renamed as SG210, the squadron later took part in the advance into Russia, where Schenck was awarded his Knights Cross. In March 1942 Schenck took command of 1./ZG1, and was awarded the Oak Leaves to his Knights Cross with this unit. He went on to command SG2, flying Fw190s in the Mediterranean. Later, from December 1944 to January 1945, Schenck commanded KG51, flying the newly developed Me262 jet fighter-bomber. Flying over 400 missions, Schenck scored 18 aerial victories and sunk 28,000 tons of shipping. Wolfgang Schenck passed away on 5th March 2010.




Hauptmann Karl-Fritz Schlossstein
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5 / 3 / 2010Ace : 8.00 Victories
Hauptmann Karl-Fritz Schlossstein

Karl-Fritz Schlossstein initially flew Me110 heavy destroyers with JG5, when th Group first arrived in Norway in 1942 to provide air cover for the convoys supplying the rapidly increasing German garrison in that country. He commanded 13(Z)/JG5 from the summer of 1942 to June 1943, and then converted to fly Me109s. Later in Norway he flew the Me410 Hornet with ZG76, but finished the war with JG54 Greenhearts flying Fw190s in the Defence of the Reich.




Gefreiter Kar-Heinz Schoenemann
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Gefreiter Kar-Heinz Schoenemann

Karl-Heinz Schoenemann joined the Luftwaffe in 1942, straight out of college. His aptitude led him to be chosen for training as a wireless operator and airborne radar specialist. After training on various types, including the Junkers Ju86 and Heinkel He219, he eventually became operational as the electronics operator aboard the Messerschmitt 110G. Posted to join NJGI, he served on Me110s until late 1944 when his aircraft crash-landed near the town of Sedan in northern France, where he was captured by the Americans. He spent the remainder of the war as a POW.



Oberleutnant Kurt Schulze
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Oberleutnant Kurt Schulze
Oberleutnant Kurt Schulze

After serving with the Air Signals Corps during the Blitzkrieg through the Low Countries and France, Kurt Schulze then flew as a Me110 Wireless Operator over southern Russia, before returning to the west. Here he flew night missions against England in Do217s with I./KG2. In September 1943 he transferred to train as a fighter pilot, and flew 65 missions in Me109s with III./JG5 on the Arctic Front, scoring three victories. In November 1944 he flew in the ill-fated defence of the German battleship Tirpitz. In March 1945 he commanded I./JG51 in the encircled east German city of Danzig, before returning to Norway in May 1945 to command 16./JG5.




Hauptmann Peter Spoden
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Hauptmann Peter Spoden
5 / 3 / 2010Ace : 26.00 Victories
Hauptmann Peter Spoden

Peter Spoden was born in Borken near Minster on 8th November 1921. Peter Spoden completed his education in 1940 and worked initially on the railways. Spoden learned to fly gliders with the Hitler Youth. He finally joined the Luftwaffe in October 1941. Spoden trained at the Luftkriegsschule 4 at Fürstenfeldbruck. After gaining his Pilot’s Badge and A/B flying certificate, Spoden attended Flugzeugführerschule C 17 at Pütnitz where he trained to fly multi-engine types. On the 1st of February 1942 Spoden was promoted to the rank of Leutnant and on 1st September, Spoden attended the Blindflugschule at Copenhagen for instrument flight training before pgoing to the Nachtjagdschule at Kitzingen for operational training. On 1 June 1943, Leutnant Spoden was assigned to 6./NJG 5 based at Parchim. He scored his first victory on the Peenemunde raid when he intercepted a RAF formation of Lancaster bomber between Hanshagen and Greifswald.whihc were attacking the German the research facilities. On the night of 22/23 August, while attacking RAF bomber formations over Berlin, Spoden shot down a Halifax, before engaging an RAF Stirling four-engine bomber. He shot down the Stirling, but the bombers rear-gunner was able to score hits on Spoden’s Bf 110 night-fighter, wounding him in the left leg, and setting his aircraft on fire. Spoden baled out of his Me110 but contacted the tail unit pinning him to the elevator. Fortunately, he was thrown clear. Spoden spent three months recuperating before returning to 5./NJG 5 in November and in August 1944, Spoden was transferred to the Stabsstaffel of II./NJG 6 based at Swäbisch Hall. On the night of 26/27 December, he was seeking Allied gliders supplying men and equipment to encircled troops at Bastogne when his Me110 was hit by German flak. The port engine caught fire and Spoden was forced to belly-land his aircraft near Stradtkyll. Spoden was knocked unconscious and was pulled from the blazing wreckage by his crewmen. On 21 February 1945, Spoden recorded his 20th victory when he shot down Lancaster near Worms. In late February, he was awarded the Deutsches Kreuz in Gold for 22 victories. Returning to night fighting he eventually became Gruppenkommandeur of I./NJG6 on 19th March 1945, his final tally was 26 victories. On 29 April 1945 the remnants of NJG 6 surrendered to American troops at Schleissheim. Spoden was released from captivity in autumn 1945. In 1954, he was accepted for a Lufthansa training programme to become an airline pilot. He completed the course on 20 July 1955, retiring in 1981.




Oberfeldwebel Alfred Staffa
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Oberfeldwebel Alfred Staffa
Oberfeldwebel Alfred Staffa

Born in the Czech Republic, Alfred Staffa qualified as a Luftwaffe radio-operator in November 1941. In January 1942 he was posted to II. Gruppe, NJG I as radio-operator to Otto Fries flying the Me110. On 28 August, 1942, they were shot down in flames by the rear-gunner of an RAF Stirling bomber, and again shot down in May 1944. In June 1944 he joined 6./NJG 1, and later l./NJG 1. flying in the Heinkel 219. He also survived an ejector seat escape out of this burning aircraft. Alfred Staffa flew 102 night missions, 5 day missions and shared 18 air victories.




Oberstleutnant Erich Weissflog
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Oberstleutnant Erich Weissflog

1999Died : 1999
Oberstleutnant Erich Weissflog

Erich Weissflog flew in the Me110 Zerstorer during the Battle of Britain with II./ZG76, the Sharks Gruppe. He was also radio operator to Hans-Joachim Jabs on almost all his Destroyer, and later, night fighter missions in NG1. He was awarded the Knights Cross in 1944 and participated in a total of 48 day and night air victories. He passed away in 1999.




Oberfeldwebel Hermann Wieczorek
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Oberfeldwebel Hermann Wieczorek
Oberfeldwebel Hermann Wieczorek

Hermann Wieczorek joined the Luftwaffe in 1935 and served as a flight mechanic before training as a pilot. Upon qualifying, he served initially as a flying instructor before joining Oberfehlshaber Sud, under General Kesselring, flying photoreconnaissance missions in the ME-110 and JU-88 over Italy and North Africa. In June, 1944, he was transferred to 1./KG51, flying the ME-262 on the Western Front. Hermann flew the 262 in the action against the Bridge at Remagen and afterword until the end of the war.




Feldwebel Willi Wust
Click the name above to see prints signed by Feldwebel Willi Wust
Feldwebel Willi Wust

Together with his pilot - Knights Cross winner Alfred Wehmeyer, Willi Wust flew as radio operator in the Me110 Zerstorer during the Battle of Britain with III./ZG26 Horst Wessel. In 1941 he and Wehmeyer were posted with ZG26 to the Mediterranean where they flew over 113 combat missions in Africa and Crete, scoring 8 air victories. He was awarded the Knights Cross First Class.




Major Paul Zorner
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Major Paul Zorner
1999Ace : 59.00 Victories
Major Paul Zorner

Originally a transport pilot, Paul Zorner flew in North Africa, the Mediterranean and southern Russia before retraining as a nightfighter pilot, joining II./NJG2 in 1942 flying the Ju88. In December he took command of 2./NJG3 operating first the Do217 and then the Me110. At the beginning of 1943 he was squadron commander of 3./NJG3 and then 8./NJG3, which he led until April 1944, when he took command of III./NJG5, re-equipping with the Ju88G-6. In October 1944 he was promoted to become Kommander of II./NJG100. Paul Zorner was credited with 59 victories and was awarded the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves.


About our Signatures on Artwork

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 German ace Lt. Fritz Roth of Jasta 23, flying an Albatross D.Va scores his first of three balloons in one days action. By the wars end he had accounted for 20 balloons and 8 Allied Aircraft.

Balloon Buster, 25th January 1918 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284.

Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 A moment during the fraught encounter on 27th May 1940 over Dunkirk between Spitfires of 610 Sqn and an estimated 40 Bf.110s during which three Zerstorers were shot down.

A Dunkirk Encounter by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £270.00
A surprise dive bombing attack at 12.45pm as Spitfires of 65 squadron were taking off. 148 bombs were dropped on the airfield and hangars. The entire squadron got airborne with one exception, its engine was stopped by the blast from one of the bombs.

Battle of Britain, Manston, 12th August 1940 by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £125.00

 Despite crippling damage to their Lancaster ED925 (G), the crew of AJ-M continued to press home their attack on the Mohne Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943. With both port engines ablaze, Flt Lt J V Hopgood forced his blazing aircraft on, releasing the Upkeep bomb just precious seconds too late to strike the dam, the mine instead bouncing over the wall and onto the power station below with devastating results. ED925 attempted to recover from the maelstrom, but the fuel fire was too intense and the aircraft was tragically lost, just two of her crew managing to escape the impact to spend the rest of the war as PoWs.

No Way Back by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
 When the RAF took delivery of their first Consolidated B.24 Liberators in 1941, aerial cover for trans-Atlantic convoys was strengthened, affording these brave merchant ships a modicum of protection as they forged their slow passage from the US to Britain with vital supplies. 120 Sqn was immediately pressed into this role from their initial base at Nutts Corner in Northern Ireland, before moving to Ballykelly and Reykjavik in Iceland as the U-Boat threat increased. The example shown is a Liberator V of RAF Coastal Command.

The Long Patrol by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £550.00
 AH-1 Whiskey Cobras of the US marine Corps in Action, Kuwait, February 1991.

Cobra Attack by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
It was during the inter-war period that a reawakening interest in twin engined fighter design prompted several countries to investigate a number of revolutionary concepts, of these only the Lockheeds sleek and unconventional P.38 was to be put into large scale production, proving to be a versatile and dominant fighter possessed of extremely long range, good speed and manoeuverability and a formidable armament. When production ceased in 1945, 9,923 examples of the P38 Lightning had been delivered.

Fork Tailed Devil (Lightning) by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £40.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

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 Two Fairey Firefly fighter-bombers of 810 Sqn, Fleet Air Arm, overfly the carrier HMS Theseus during the Korean War.

HMS Theseus by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
Ships of the Falklands Task Force formate following the Argentine surrender in 1982.  Nearest is Leander class frigate HMS Andromeda with RFA Brambleleaf in her wake.  The Type 22 frigate HMS Brilliant is to the left of the picture, with the carrier HMS Invincible dominating the right.  HMS Hermes and her escorts are in the extreme distance.

Victory Parade by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2900.00
Germanys U-boat fleet had almost brought Britain to its knees in the First World war, twenty years later the story was very similar. the German U-boat arm came perilously close to cutting the lifeline that crossed the Atlantic between North America and Britain. in the early years of the war Donitz realised that keeping his U-boats at sea for as long as possible would greatly increase their chances of success. here U-93 (left) and U-94 take fuel from the auxiliary cruiser Kormoran whilst in the mid-Atlantic during 1941

Dawn Rendezvous by Anthony Saunders (P)
Half Price! - £2900.00
Swordfish of 825 Sqn led by Lt-Cdr Esmonde begin their heroic attack on the battlescruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen as they make their way up the English Channel from Brest during Operation Cerberus on 12th February 1942.  Although all the aircraft were lost and no significant damage was done to the German fleet, all the pilots were decorated for their bravery and Lt-Cdr Esmonde received the first Fleet Air Arm VC to be awarded, albeit posthumously.  The painting depicts the first wave of Swordfish attacking the Scharnhorst with Gneisenau taking avoiding action in the distance.  A German torpedo boat has turned to confront the attacking aircraft.

Attack on the Scharnhorst by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

Bismarck, now complete and newly painted in full Baltic camouflage, returns to Hamburg for the last time as the harsh winter of 1940/41 relents and the pride of the German Kriegsmarine prepares for real action.  In the distance, the pre-Dreadnought Schleswig-Holstein awaits her next commission, the old ship alternating between vital ice-breaker and air defence duties at this time.  The Bismarck would in May 1941 put to sea and engage and sink HMS Hood only to be caught by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  Bismarck was pounded into a floating wreck, finally being sunk by the torpedoes of HMS Dorsetshire.  From her crew of 2300 only 110 would be rescued by HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori.

Bismarck Entering Hamburg Harbour by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
With her pennant number GO4 painted out to accommodate a western approaches camouflage the destroyer HMS Onslaught punches her way through a heavy swell during escort duties in the north Atlantic

HMS Onslaught by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £1200.00
B105AP.  HMS Fearless by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Fearless by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 Between 24th may and 4th June 1940 an extraordinary armada of craft, large and small, naval and civilian, embarked on one of the greatest rescue missions in history. the evacuation of 330,000 British and French troops from the beaches of Dunkirk in northern France. the destroyer HMS Wakeful dominates the foreground here as troops pour onto the beaches and harbour moles in search of salvation. Both Wakeful and distant HMS Grafton were lost during the evacuation.

Dunkirk by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

DHM289P.   Arnhem Drop 17th September 1944 by Simon Smith.

Arnhem Drop 17th September 1944 by Simon Smith (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
 Panzer IVF2 tanks of 6th Panzer Division, Panzer Armee Hoth, attempt to fight their way through to the beleaguered Sixth Army at Stalingrad, 12th December 1942.  On the 21st the operation was abandoned when the expected breakout from Stalingrad failed to materialise, the relief column was only 25 miles from the city.

Operation Winter Tempest by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
 King Tigers of Kampfgruppe von Rosen, 3rd Company Heavy Tank Battalion 503, preparing to move out from the Tisza bridgehead to counter Soviet pressure on German forces attacking to the northwest at Debrecen during the first battles to defend the Hungarian capital of Budapest.

Tigers in the Mist by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £95.00
CC089. Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.

Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £900.00

 Panzer v Ausf. D Panthers of SS Panther Division Das Reich make their debut during the initial stages of the German summer offensive for Kursk. This unit with others of the SS Panzer Korps made the deepest advances into the well-prepared Soviet lines. Complete success however, was to elude them when outrunning their supporting divisions at Prokhorovka they were forced to halt for six days.

Operation Zitadelle by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

D-Day Gold Beach, 6th June 1944 by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Superb figure study of the 82nd Airborne in 1944.

82nd Airborne by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £80.00

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