Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!

Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Product Search            

Ivan Berryman World War One Aces Series.  This major series of paintings and prints, extending to around 100 paintings in total, includes many of the great aviators of the first world war.  Some of these are well known, the Red Baron, Albert Ball, Werner Voss, James McCudden for example, but many are less prominent, but nevertheless became Aces in the dangerous flying days of WW1.  This series of magnificent paintings covers all these men, from Germany, Britain, France, Canada and other nations.

It is easy to forget that when the Great War broke out in 1914 the aeroplane was actually only eleven years old and yet, by the time of the 1918 Armistice, it had been developed into a hybrid instrument of war that was capable of bombing, reconnaissance, ground strafing and, of course, one-on-one aerial combat. And by today’s standards – or even those of World War Two – these machines were still extremely primitive and flying them, let alone fighting in them, was fraught with danger.

Fragile in the extreme, their fabric skins were prone to tearing away in the slipstream when damaged and were so very vulnerable to the ravages of a fire that few crews survived an aerial conflagration. These flying machines’ flimsy frames and wings were strengthened and stressed by taut wires that, like the standing rigging of a sailing ship, kept everything in place…until shot through or burned away in combat. Very little protection was afforded the pilots and observers in World War 1 and frequently jamming guns and seizing engines only added to their peril. Spares were hard to come by and makeshift repairs at the front line temporary airfields tested the ingenuity of the mechanics and ground crews whose job it was to keep the aircraft in combat-ready condition. Add to this volatile mixture of potential misadventures the fact that pilot training was minimal and that air fighting was still so new that no hard and fast rules had been established, then the more we might understand the mettle of the young men who first dipped a toe in the waters of the air war.

 Captain Arthur Henry Cobby

Captain Arthur Henry Cobby

Not until the advent of the fixed, forward firing gun did the single seat fighter become the killing machine that we know today. Advances in firing mechanisms that enabled the single or twin machine guns to fire through the spinning propeller revolutionised the fighter or scout aeroplane. Pilots began to score more and more victories, many of them becoming national celebrities in their homelands and gaining notoriety among their enemies. So many of these ‘Aces’ were quiet, unassuming individuals who cared little for the war and even less for shooting down young opponents who were, after all, no different to themselves and yet they would find themselves thrust into the spotlight by their admirers and thus put under even greater pressure to continue raising their tally whilst at the same time leading and teaching others.   Novice pilots were frequently overwhelmed by their first experience of a dogfight where as many as sixty aircraft might be wheeling and diving in the space of just one cubic mile of airspace. Confusion, misidentification and mid air collisions were frequent and inevitable.

Yet, from this melee, some semblance of order did emerge, often the product of great leaders like Oswald Boelke who single-handedly wrote the first book of rules of engagement which, for the first time, gave young pilots a guide to how to fight in the air, how to surprise the enemy and how to avoid being shot down. So precise and so prescient were these rules that they still stand today. Boelke also was partly responsible for the instigation of the Fighting Group, bringing together a force of 37 Jagdstaffeln – or Hunting Squadrons – whose job it was not to venture into enemy territory, but to seek out the intruding observation aircraft and their escorts and shoot them down. This they did with ruthless efficiency, their superior Albatross D.IIIs decimating the aged BE.2Cs and RE.8s of the Royal Flying Corps. Indeed, during April 1917, the RFC alone suffered the loss of 316 pilots and observers to the German Jastas that prowled the skies above the Western Front. In what became known as ‘Bloody April’, the sparse numbers of Bristol F.2Bs, Sopwith Triplanes and Nieuport Scouts had no answer to their superior German counterparts. Not until the arrival of the Sopwith Camel, the SE.5 and Spad S.VII did these adversaries meet on even terms, thus beginning the era of the dogfight and the aspiration to become a top scoring ‘Ace’.


Whilst many pilots continued with their lone vigils into 1918, popular opinion supported the German idea of large formations of aircraft piloted by better trained crews with the premise of operating as a single fighting force, rather than as individuals. Leaders such as Edward ‘Mick’ Mannock amply demonstrated the benefits of such formations whilst Commander of 74 Squadron, Mannock himself adding 36 victories to his personal score in the space of just three months.

Out Of The Sun – LFG Roland C.II

Out Of The Sun – LFG Roland C.II

The Germans, meanwhile, suddenly found themselves unable to match the Allies for sheer numbers. As the tide began to turn against Germany early in 1918, the Jastas began to form into larger groups which earned the nickname ‘Circuses’, largely because they travelled from location to location to bring pressure to bear wherever it was needed instead of operating from fixed airstrips. The most famous of these Circuses was, of course, that led by Manfred von Richthofen, the ‘Red Baron’ who would ultimately be recognised as the highest scoring Ace of them all with a staggering 80 confirmed victories to his credit. Made up almost exclusively of the nimble Fokker DR.1 Triplane, the Albatross D.V and Pfalz D.III, Richthofen’s Flying Circus, comprising Jastas 4, 6, 10 and 11, took the fight to the Allied squadrons and wrought a terrible toll on them but, with the death of von Richthofen in April 1918, their appetite to fight seemed to visibly wane and even the introduction of the superb Fokker D.VII was unable to stem the impending victory of the Allied pilots in the skies above France.

In August 1918, a huge force of aircraft comprising the newly christened RAF’s 43, 54, 73, 201, 203, 208 and 209 squadrons launched a final offensive. The Sopwith Camels and SE.5As tore into the demoralised German formations and great pilots such as Werner Voss fell to their guns in the closing months.

Kleiner Freund - Zeppelin Staaken R.VI

Kleiner Freund - Zeppelin Staaken R.VI

So ended the first era of aerial combat in which the aeroplane proved itself to be a potent fighting machine in the hands of young men who had learned their art in an incredibly short time and who had set in stone the rule book on how it should be done. The equipment and technology may have changed almost beyond recognition in the ensuing 90 years or so, but many combat techniques and principles have remained, a legacy of those tentative years when the World’s first air forces and brave aerial gladiators took their first faltering steps and changed the course of history for ever.

This series of paintings of just some of the many Aces and their aircraft are intended not to glorify war, but to salute their innovation and their bravery. We will never see their like again.

Ivan Berryman, 2008.

WW1 Aces Series

 Handley Page 0/400s are attacked by German Albatross fighters as they return home from a raid during 1918.
Difficult Journey Home by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£110.00
 A German Albatross D-III sees off a Bristol Fighter among the clouds over the Western Front, early in 1917. The D-III was a massive improvement over the monoplanes of the time, possessing greater manoeuvrability, a higher ceiling and synchronized guns. Many German aces thought this the best fighter of the First World War.
One in the Bag by Ivan BerrymanClick For Details£140.00
 The air battle that took place above the trenches of France on the evening of 23rd September 1917 was to go down in history as one of the most extraordinary dogfights ever. The young German ace Werner Voss found himself engaged with no fewer than eleven SE5s of 56 Sqn, among them British aces such as James McCudden and Arthur Rhys Davids. Hugely outnumbered, the brave Voss saw off several British aircraft with his amazing airmanship and accuracy of fire. Again and again he could have fled the scene due to his Triplanes superior rate of climb, but his attacks were insistent and deadly. His final moments came when Rhys Davids found himself on the tail of Voss and fired both his Lewis and Vickers guns into the little turqoise Triplane which was seen to drift toward the ground, his aircraft inverting before impact, killing Voss instantly. The painting shows Voss distinctive pre-production Fokker F. 1, with the yellow nose of Jasta 10, being pursued by the SE5 of Rhys Davids while, high above,a Spad is helping to keep a gaggle of Albatross DVs at bay.
Last Dogfight of Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Sopwith Camels of 45 Sqn, Istrana, are shown on an early patrol on a crisp morning in the Winter of 1917-18.  B6238 was an aircraft shared by Lts E McN Hand and H M Moody, whilst B6354 was the mount of Lt J C B Firth. A Hand of Aces by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£60.00
 Credited with no fewer than 80 victories, Manfred Von Richthofen, The Red Baron, became legendary, not least for the 17 kills scored whilst flying the diminutive Fokker DR1 Triplane.  Contrary to popular belief, however, only one of his aircraft is known to have been painted all red. Serial no. 477/17 is shown here dicing with an SE5. Seeing Red by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£140.00
 Bathed in the low winter sun over southern England, Gotha G.V.s are attacked by defending Sopwith Camels as the German bombers penetrate the south-eastern counties en route to London.  This was, effectively, the first Battle of Britain, staged during the winter of 1917/18, during which the intruders were frequently repelled, their bomb loads falling harmlessly on English soil.
Gotha G. V. by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
Albert Ball in his Nieuport 17 having just shot down a German LVG.  His aircraft, A134, was distinctive in having a bright red spinner.  He was the first Royal Flying Corps pilot to score a hat-trick (3 kills on a single mission) and, in the course of his career, scored another two on his way to his outstanding 44 victories.
Albert Ball by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£120.00
Lieutenant Leefe-Robinsons BE2C, converted to single-seater night-fighter configuration, destroying the German SL11 over Hertfordshire on the night of 2/3 September, 1916. Robinson attacked the SL11 from below, raking it with incendiary fire, before turning and diving past the airship for another attack. As he did so, the airship exploded into flames and crashed into a field near Cuffley, killing all sixteen crew. For this action, Leefe-Robinson was awarded the VC.
William Leefe-Robinson by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£140.00
 Captain Edward Rickenbacker of the 94th Sqn, United States Air Force, is shown in his Spad S.XIII, pursuing a Fokker D.VII. Eddie scored his first victory on 29th April 1918, but by the November Armistice he had increased his tally to 26 confirmed kills.
Edward Rickenbacker by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Max Immelmanns Fokker E.1(E13/15) shooting down a Vickers Gunbus during the Summer of 1915. Immelmann is characteristically already scouring the sky above for his next victim.
Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Major Lanoe G Hawkers Bristol Scout C 1611, the No 6 Sqn aircraft in which he shot down two enemy planes on 25th July, 1915, and sufficiently damaged a third enemy aircraft to force it to the ground. He is shown here in combat with an Albatross C.III - soon to fall as one of his victims that day.  Lanoe G Hawker earned the first aerial Victoria Cross (VC) of the war for this action, but was killed in November 1916, after a lengthy battle with the infamous Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen, becoming his 11th victim.
Lanoe G Hawker by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Hauptmann Oswald Boelcke was a shining example of everything that a fighter pilot should be, but his real legacy was his set of rules - Dicta Boelcke - that he devised for air combat, outlining techniques and tactics that became the standard for many generations of fighter pilots to come. He is shown in the aircraft in which he lost his life on 28th October 1916 when his all-black Albatross D.I was involved in a collision with his own wingman. Boelckes final tally was 40 victories.
Oswald Boelcke by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 SE5As of B Flight, 56 Sqn led by James McCudden in the aircraft numbered B519, on patrol over the Western Front in 1917.
James McCudden by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£140.00
 Flying Sopwith Snipe E8102 on 27th October 1918, Major William Barker encountered a flight of fifteen Fokker D.VIIs and decided to take them on single handed. Having downed one enemy aircraft, Barker was wounded in his left thigh and momentarily fainted. Coming to, he found another D.VII ahead of him and immediately resumed the battle. Another bullet now tore into his right leg and another shattered his left elbow. Despite his terrible injuries, Barker shot down three D.VIIs and drove the others off before crash landing his bullet-riddled Snipe in friendly territory. He survived the crash and was awarded the VC for his gallantry on this epic flight.
Major William Barker VC, DSO - Nearly an Ace in a Day by Ivan Berryman. (AP)Click For Details£180.00
 The Fokker DR.1 Triplane (213/17) of Fritz Kempf swoops on a pair of unsuspecting Sopwith Camels whilst on patrol over the Western Front in 1917. Kempfs  practise of having his name painted across the top wing of his aircraft was supplemented by the taunt Do You Remember Me? on the mid wing. His aircraft is depicted in the colours worn by Jasta Boelcke of the Imperial Air Service.
Ltn Fritz Kempf by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Credited with an impressive 34 victories, Francesco Baracca was Italys highest scoring ace in WW1 and is shown here in his distinctive Spad S.VII which carried his personal emblem, the Prancing Horse, that paid homage to his cavalry days.  Upon his death in this aircraft on 19th June 1918, Baraccas mother donated the emblem to Enzo Ferrari whose cars still carry this badge the world over.
Maggiore Francesco Baracca - Spad S.VII by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Wearing one of the most distinctive colour schemes of World War One, Germanys second highest scoring ace after Manfred Von Richthofen was the charismatic Ernst Udet with 62 victories to his credit.  His brightly coloured Fokker D.VII carried the initials of his girlfriend (LO) on the side of his aircraft and the inscription Du Noch Nicht! (Not You Yet!) on the upper tail surfaces.  Udet was badly wounded in September 1918 and did not fly in combat again, but survived the war, only to commit suicide in 1941.
Oberleutnant Ernst Udet by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
DHM1578. Oberleutnant Hermann Goring by Ivan Berryman. Synonymous with both World Wars, the young Hermann Goring scored his first victory on 16th November 1915, shooting down a Maurice Farman over Tahure. A year later, he was injured in combat, but managed to land his bullet-riddled aircraft near a field hospital. Goring steadily increased his score to an eventual 22 victories and is shown here on patrol in his characteristic all-white Fokker D.VII.
Oberleutnant Hermann Goring by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Albatros DIII of Godwin Brumowski about to shoot down a Caquot balloon.
Oberleutnant Godwin Brumowski by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Raymond Collishaw is shown heading B-Flight of No.10 Naval Squadron in 1917, comprised of five Sopwith Triplanes that became known as the Black Flight - all flown with great success by Canadian pilots. Collishaws aircraft was named Black Maria, Reids was Black Roger and Sharmans was Black Death, while Nash and Alexander flew Black Sheep and Black Prince respectively. Collishaws personal tally at the end of the war was 60 victories.
Lieutenant-Colonel Raymond Collishaw by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Germays greatest exponent of the Fokker Dr1 Triplane, Leutnant Josef Jacobs is depicted chatting with colleagues of Jasta 7 before a sortie in the spring of 1918.  His black Triplane became well known to allied pilots, not least because of his formidable kill rate.  By the end of the war, still aged just 24, Jacobs had claimed 48 enemy aircraft destroyed.  The unusual practice of applying the black cross to the upper sides of the lower wings was to counter friendly fire from other German aircraft who frequently mistook the Dr1 for a Sopwith Triplane.
Leutnant Josef Jacobs by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Formidable commander of Jasta Boelcke, Karl Bolle, breaks off the attack on a 73 Sqn Sopwith Camel as its fuel tank begins to ignite - another undeniable victory in a career which saw him take an eventual 36 confirmed kills. The yellow band on the fuselage paid homage to his former unit, flanked by the black and white Prussian stripes Bolles Fokker DR.1 also sported an Oigee telescopic gunsight mounted between the guns. he survived two World Wars and died in Berlin in 1955.
Rittmeister Karl Bolle by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 On the evening of 7th May 1917, a fierce battle took place involving aircraft of Jasta 11 and 56 Sqn RFC, the former led by the brother of the Red Baron, Lothar von Richthofen. As the sun dipped beneath the heavy clouds, most expected the dogfight to break off in the fading light, but an extraordinary duel between the RFCs Captain Albert Ball and Lothar von Richthofen broke out, the two aircraft flying directly at each other, firing continuously, then turning and repeating the manoeuvre. Lothars all red Albatross was damaged, but landed safely. Albert Balls SE5, however, was seen by observers to fall through the heavy cloudbase inverted, before crashing heavily, fatally wounding Ball.
Oberleutnant Lothar Freiherr von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 One of Frances most venerated pilots in World War 1 was Capitaine Georges Guynemer whose final victory tally has never been fully established, although he has been officially credited with 53 kills. It is more likely, however, that his actual total was nearer to 88! He is shown here in his Spad S.VII having just claimed his 31st victim, a Gotha bomber.
Capitaine Georges Guynemer by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Victory No 26 for Josef Mai was a 64 Squadron SE5.A on 5th September 1918, here falling victim to the guns of the aces zebra-striped Fokker D.VII 4598/18 of Jasta 5. By the end of the war, his total had risen to 30 aircraft destroyed, Mai himself collecting a number of decorations, among them the Iron Cross 1st and 2nd class. Surviving the Great War, it is believed that he became a flying instructor for the Luftwaffe during World War II, finally being laid to rest in 1982, aged ninety four.
Leutnant Josef Mai by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Surely one of the most irrepressible aces of World War 1, Frenchman Charles Nungessers victory total of 43 confirmed kills and a further 11 probables was achieved despite surviving a number of crashes and accidents from which he always bounced back in defiance of his quite severe injuries. His fame and prowess brought him a personal challenge from his German adversaries to take part in a one-on-one combat. Accepting the challenge, the lone Nungesser encountered not one, but six, enemy aircraft and promptly sent two of them down in flames. In this picture, his Emblems of Mortality personal motif is clearly seen on the side of his Nieuport 23 as he sees off an Albatross toward the end of the war. Nungesser survived the Great War, only to be lost over the Atlantic when attempting a flight to New York in 1927.
Sous-Lieutenant Charles Nungesser by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Aircraft of Jasta 10 prepare to taxi out for a dawn patrol, led by the fearless Leutnant Werner Voss in his Fokker F1 103/17 in September 1917. Arguments still rage concerning the colour of the engine cowling on his Triplane. Certainly, when the aircraft was delivered, its upper surfaces were painted factory finish streaked green and, it is recorded that it was flown as delivered with Voss personal mechanic noting that no extra painting was undertaken, aside from Voss Japanese kite face which occupied the nose.  However, research shows that by the time of Voss death on 23rd September 1917, after his epic battle with SE5s of 56 Sqn, the cowling was probably yellow in keeping with all Jasta 10 aircraft. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary abilities with his diminutive Triplane, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down by Lieutenant Rhys Davids on the very day that he was due to go on leave.  The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine, his aircraft not being fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.
Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 No World War 1 pilot is better known than Manfred Von Richthofen, the Red Baron, and few pilots were greater exponents of the little Fokker DR.1 Triplane in which he scored nineteen of his eighty victories. In fact, only one of the DR.1s flown by von Richthofen was painted all-over Red. In April 1918, 127/17 was his mount, this machine being depicted here shortly after take off in company with other Jasta 11 pilots of his notorious Flying Circus. Among this formation are: Ltn Eberhardt Mohnicke, Ltn Hans Joachim Wolff, Rittm Manfred von Richthofen and his brother Ltn Lothar von Richthofen. The Flying Circus soubriquet was appended by the British and Canadian forces and was never used by von Richthofen or Jasta 11 themselves, but the sight of the red-nosed Triplanes as they joined battle in the skies above France signaled to Allied pilots a tough battle ahead.
Von Richthofens Flying Circus by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 The Bristol F.2b (or Bristol Fighter, as it was more popularly known) first entered service with the RFC in March 1917 and quickly established itself  as a useful and reliable fighting machine in the capable hands of the crews who quickly exploited its many attributes. The teamwork between pilot and gunner / observer yielded many success stories, both in the roles of air combat and ground attack. Here, Captain W E Staton has a stab at a   Fokker DR.1 during an intense battle in April 1918 in the skies above France,  whilst his pilot, Lieutenant John R Gordon keeps their 62 Squadron machine  out of harms way. The combination of Gordon and Staton scored a total of 9 confirmed victories, 1 shared destroyed and 5 out of control.
Deadly Partnership - Captain W E Staton and Lieutenant John R Gordon, Bristol F.2b by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 The vulnerability of early air gunners is evident in this painting as this Royal Aircraft Establishment FE 2 comes under attack from a Fokker E.III early in World War 1. Archaic in appearance, compared to their German rivals, the FE2 was nevertheless heavily armed with three Lewis guns arranged to cover almost every angle, one of them fixed in a forward firing position for the pilot to operate.
Tribute to the Air Gunners - Royal Aircraft Establishment FE2 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Undoubtedly one of the truly great Aces of the First World War, William Billy Bishop became celebrated for his technique of actively seeking out the enemy and bringing the fight to him, rather than the more usual practice of patrolling in search of enemy activity. An example of this was his single-handed attack on a German airfield in June 1917 when he destroyed not only a number of aircraft on the ground, but then successfully despatched another seven Albatross scouts that took off to engage him. For this action, he was awarded the Victoria Cross in August 1917 and his final tally when the war ended was 72 confirmed victories. He is depicted here in his Nieuport Scout B1566 in combat with a Pfalz D.III.
Captain William Billy Bishop by Ivan Berryman. (AP)Click For Details£170.00
 The extraordinary Taube (or Dove) was extensively used by the Germans as a reliable, stable observation and reconnaissance aircraft as late as 1916, despite its archaic appearance. The Taube type first flew in Austria in 1909, the brainchild of Dr Igo Etrich and employed the early method of directional control known as differential wing-warping, instead of possessing ailerons and elevators. This version was powered by a Mercedes 6-cylinder inline engine and is a two-seat variant, much favoured by the Germans.
Etrich Taube by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Of similar configuration, but usually outclassed by its British contemporary, the Bristol F2b, the Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG was essentially a strong and stable observation aircraft that served widely during World War 1. On 21st May 1917, this example became the victim of the guns of Sergeant John H  Jones, contributing to his eventual tally of 15 victories. Here, his pilot that day, Captain W G Mostyn, has already had a squirt using his forward-firing Vickers gun before manoeuvring their 22 Sqn machine into position for Jones to finish the job with his twin Lewis guns.
Sergeant John H Jones and pilot Captain W G Mostyn, Bristol F2b Fighter claiming a Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£50.00
 After service in the 96th Infantry Regiment, Smirnov joined the XIX Corps Air Squadron in 1914, shooting down twelve enemy aircraft in the course of two years. When revolution swept through Russia in November 1917, he escaped the Bolsheviks via a White counter-revolutionary route, eventually joining the RAF in England, serving at the Central Flying School at Upavon. He is shown here in his silver Nieuport 17, having just despatched a Roland C.II.
Captain Ivan Smirnov by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£35.00
 When pilots took off from the respective airfields in the 1914/18 war, they would rarely know what lay ahead. For Otto Kissenberth, the 12th October 1916 was to be a baptism of fire. Flying Fokker D.II 540/16, he scored his first three victories in quick succession, shooting down two Maurice Farmans and a Breguet V, as shown here. Unusual among fighter pilots of the time for the simple reason that he wore spectacles, Kissenberth went on to score an eventual 20 victories and survived the war, only to be killed whilst mountaineering in 1919.
Oberleutnant Otto Kissenberth by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£60.00
 An early star of Jasta 1, von Keudell is depicted here in his Halberstadt D.III, (instantly identifiable by his initial K on the fuselage side) as he drifts into position to exploit the blindspot of a Vickers Gunbus, late in the day in 1916. Von Keudells closing tally was 11 confirmed victories, but a possible 12.
Leutnant Hans von Keudell by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£50.00
 Despite having sight in just one eye, Major Edward Mick Mannock was to become one of the most decorated and celebrated aces of World War 1, bringing down an official 61 enemy aircraft in just eighteen months before himself being brought down in flames by enemy ground fire. He was reluctant to add shared kills to his tally, so his actual total of victories is recorded at 73. His decorations include the VC, DSO and 2 Bars, MC and Bar and he is depicted here diving on enemy aircraft in SE5a D278 of 74 Sqn in April, 1918.
Major Edward Mannock by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£50.00
 The Fokker E II of Leutnant Kurt Freiherr von Crailsheim of FFA 53 is shown in formation with his wingman in a similar aircraft. Von Crailsheims aircraft bears his personalised markings of yellow, black and white diagonal bars on the fuselage, thought to represent his Military Merit Medal combined with the black and white of Prussia. The cross on the fuselage sides was applied in an unusually forward position. FFA 53 was based at Monthois late in 1915 and it was from this location that von Crailsheim made his final flight in this aircraft on 30th December.
Kurt von Crailsheim by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£35.00
 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.
Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£60.00
 The distinctive black-fuselaged Albatross D.V of Jasta 12s commander taxis out for take off behind the similar machine of Leutnant d R Friedrich Hochstetter at Roucourt, late in 1917. Whilst all of Jasta 12s aircraft possessed black tails, many of them bore their pilots personalised insignia painted large on the fuselage sides. In the case of Hochstetter, it was a stacked shot emblem, whilst others sported castles, diagonal crosses or various geometric shapes. The origin of Schobingers light blue design is unknown, but may have been applied purely for recognition purposes. His final tally was eight victories, while Hochstetter scored just one.
Leutnant d R Viktor Schobinger by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£70.00
 The Royal Aircraft Factory RE.8 (Reconnaissance Experimental 8), or Harry Tate as its crews affectionately called it, was used throughout the Great War to good effect, but was something of an anachronism when pitted against the more modern machines of the Jastas. However, Lieutenants Rothes Pithey and Rhodes scored a credible 10 victories together, sending down three Pfalz D.IIIs on a single mission on 7th June 1918 flying F6097.
Lieutenant Croye Rothes Pithey and Lieutenant Hervey Rhodes, RE.8 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£70.00
 A veteran of over 150 missions flying the DH.4, Captain Euan Dickson was credited with an impressive 14 victories during his service with both the RNAS and RAF. After the war, Dickson returned to New Zealand where he continued to fly, pioneering mail routes and becoming the first man to fly across Cook Strait in 1920. His 205 Squadron DH.4 is shown here as Observer / Gunner V Robinson rakes an attacking Pfalz D.III on 3rd May, 1918, sending it spiraling to the ground out of control.
Captain Euan Dickson and AGL V Robinson, DH.4 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£70.00
 The aerial battle of 21st April 1918 was notable for involving two young novice pilots, each from opposing sides, and their part in the events that followed was as significant as it was tragic. Both William Wop May and Wolfram Ulf von Richthofen had been instructed to stay out of trouble, to remain on the very outskirts should a battle occur and simply get used to being in the sky with so many other aircraft. Delighted to have been assigned to Jasta 11 under the custodianship of his older, eminent cousin, Manfred, Wolfram was eager to cut his teeth and show that he, too, could get the job done. Both he and May kept a watchful vigil over proceedings from a safe distance as battle was joined between the red-nosed Fokker DR.1s of Jasta 11, the green-tailed Albatrosses of Jasta 5 and the RFC Sopwith Camels of 209 Squadron.  Somehow, whether through carelessness or the adrenalin rush of the moment, Wolfram flew his Fokker tantalisingly close to Mays Camel who immediately gave chase, sensing that an easy first kill might just be a possibility. May quickly realised that all was not well, however, finding his guns jammed and unable to fire. He quickly broke off the attack and swooped away, but his actions had caught the attention of Manfred von Richthofen who, although engaged in a battle of his own, had been keeping a watchful eye over his young charge. The red Triplane now latched onto the tail of Mays helpless Camel and a lurid chase began along the Somme River, a chase from which the Red Baron would not return.  The young Wolfram went on to become an ace, scoring all of his eight victories in the closing months of the war, was awarded the Iron Cross 1st and 2nd and survived to be a major force in Hitlers Luftwaffe in World War Two. He was eventually taken prisoner and spent his last months in an American PoW camp where he died of a brain tumour in 1945.
Leutnant Wolfram von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£70.00
 Shown in the colours of Jasta Boelke and carrying Baumers personal red / white /  black flash on the fuselage, Fokker DR.1 204/17 was the aircraft in which he scored many of his 43 victories. Although the Sopwith Triplane had been withdrawn from service, German pilots frequently found their DR.1s being mistakenly attacked by their own flak batteries and, sometimes, by other pilots. For this reason, in march 1918, Baumers aircraft bore additional crosses on the centre of the tailplane and on the lower wings to aid identification. For some reason, his rudder displayed what appeared to be an incomplete border to the national marking. Nicknamed Der Eiserne Adler -The Iron Eagle - Paul Baumer survived the war, but died in a flying accident near Copenhagen whilst testing the Rohrbach Rofix fighter.  He is shown in action having just downed an RE.8 while, above him, Leutnant Otto Lofflers DR.1 190/17 banks into the sun to begin another attack.
Leutnant Paul Baumer by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£35.00
 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.
Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£60.00
 The highest scoring Sopwith Camel ace of World War 1, Donald MacLaren was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1893. Joining the Royal Flying Corps in 1917 as a trainee pilot, it was only the following March that he claimed his first victory, a Hannover C-Type whilst posted to 46 Squadron. His kill rate was quite formidable for, in this the final year of the war, he was to claim no fewer than 54 confirmed victories. Indeed, in the period from 15th September to 2nd October, he claimed eight Fokker D.VIIs - a remarkable feat against Germanys most potent fighter. He is pictured here attacking a D.VII in Camel F2137 U of 46 Sqn. MacLaren survived the war and died in 1989.
Donald MacLaren by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£50.00
 During a patrol on 6th July 1918, Christiansen spotted a British submarine on the surface of the Thames Estuary. He immediately turned and put his Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 floatplane into an attacking dive, raking the submarine C.25 with machine gun fire, killing the captain and five other crewmen. This victory was added to his personal tally, bringing his score to 13 kills by the end of the war, even though the submarine managed to limp back to safety. Christiansen survived the war and went on to work as a pilot for the Dornier company, notably flying the giant Dornier Do.X on its inaugural flight to New York in 1930. He died in 1972, aged 93.
Kapitanleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£60.00
 Replacing Ewald Blumenbach as commander of Jasta 12 in May 1917, Hermann Becker continued his impressive scoring rate utilising the superb Siemens-Schuckert D.IV fighter, shown here in Beckers distinctive blue and white livery. One of the most advanced fighters of World War 1, this aircraft was possessed of an incredible rate of climb, taking just some 12 minutes to reach 16,000ft and having an operational ceiling of 26,240ft. Becker is depicted here claiming one of the many Spads that he shot down on his way to a final victory total of 23, all of them with Jasta 12.
Leutnant Hermann Becker by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Having spotted smoke on the horizon, Vice-Admiral Sir David Beatty ordered that a floatplane be immediately launched from HMS Engadine to investigate. Without delay, Short 184 (serial No 8359) was airborne, but had to maintain a modest altitude due to the low cloud base. Flight Lieutenant Frederick Rutland (who would forevermore be known as Rutland of Jutland) and his observer G.S. Trewin, quickly spotted the German fleet, but found their radio transmissions to be jammed and, upon encountering engine problems, were forced to return to their tender where they were able to file their report. Sadly, an increasing swell made a further flight impossible and their report failed to be relayed to the British Fleet who continued their engagement with the Germans without the benefit of aerial reconnaissance.
Flight Lieutenant Rutland and Assistant Paymaster Trewin Locate the German Fleet at Jutland, 31st May, 1916 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 During an amazing spree of balloon-busting during 1918, Willy Coppens gained notoriety over the Western Front for his sheer daring and marksmanship, sending no fewer than 35 observation balloons plummeting to the ground, as well as two aircraft. Here, Coppens despatches a Drachen balloon flying his modified Hanriot HD.1 No23 which he had painted blue because he so disliked the ugly, bad camouflage in which it was delivered. Despite losing a leg whilst downing his final two balloons, Coppens survived the war and lived a full life until his death in December 1986.
Sous-Lieutenant Willy Coppens - Roasting A Sausage by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Albatros C.III C.766/16 was among the most distinctively-painted aircraft of World War 1, its fuselage sides decorated with a dragon motif on the starboard side and a stylised crocodile on the other, both apparently chasing a tiny white biplane. This was the aircraft shared by Erwin Bohme and his observer, Leutnant Ladermacher while serving with Jasta 10 on the Eastern Front in August 1916. Bohme was soon chosen to fly with the great Oswald Boelke with Jasta 2, the latter being tragically killed in a collision with Bohme on 28th October during an aerial combat with DH.2s of 24 Sqn. This tragedy haunted Bohme for many months to come, but he went on to score 24 confirmed victories before falling victim to an FK.8 on 29th September 1917. Their Albatros C.III is shown picking off a Russian Nieuport 12, his first kill on 2nd August 1916.
Leutnant der Reserve Erwin Bohme by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.
Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 The outstanding qualities of the Spad S.VII were exploited to the full by Lieutenant Paul Baer, who was to become the first ace of the United States Air Service whilst serving with the 103rd Pursuit Squadron. This former Lafayette Flying Corps volunteer is also recorded as the highest-scoring Spad pilot in the USAS, claiming 9 confirmed victories before being shot down on 22nd May 1918 and being taken prisoner. His aircraft is shown here in combat with Albatross scouts of Jasta 18.
1st Lieutenant Paul Baer by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 From 1915 to 1917, there existed a very real threat of a bombing campaign on mainland Britain as the giant German airships drifted silently and menacingly across the English Channel and the North Sea to deliver their deadly cargo on the towns and cities of the east coast. Countermeasures were soon put into action as powerful searchlights picked out the Zeppelins for the anti-aircraft batteries and RFC pilots to pour their unrelenting fire into the raiders, sometimes with little effect, sometimes with catastrophic results. Here, 2nd Lieutenant Brandons BE.2 climbs for position, its exhaust pipes aglow in the dark, whilst flak bursts all around the massive bulk of the L.33 as she passes over the east end of London on the night of 23 / 24th September 1916.
A Zeppelin over London by Ivan Berryman. (B)Click For Details£85.00
 Droning over the coast en route to another night attack on mainland Britain, the Zeppelins top gun platform goes into action as BE.2 fighters wheel around the gas-filled giants, trying desperately to fire their Brock, Pomeroy and Sparklet ammunition into the volatile gasbags that lay beneath the Zeppelins skin. Often freezing cold, always vulnerable, the defensive gunners occupied a tiny, sunken recess on the very top of the airship, shielded from the buffeting winds only by a shallow screen and their thick leather flying suits. Just a handrail and a shallow step lay between them and a vertiginous drop over the rolling sides of their massive craft. Their air-cooled Parabellum MG.14 machine guns did little to repulse their attackers, whilst the great Zeppelins offered themselves as huge, bloated targets for ground artillery as well as the brave pilots of the RFC.
Zeppelin Gunners by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Pioneers of wooden fuselages, LFG Roland honed their considerable skills in fighter design throughout World War 1, culminating in the excellent D.VI as depicted here in the capable hands of Vfw Emil Schape as he and his Jasta 33 wingman bear down on a lone SE.5 in September 1918. Schape went on to score an impressive 18 victories, all but one of them with Jasta 33. Only 150 examples of the Roland D.VI found their way to the Jastas, the type being overshadowed by the Fokker D.VII and Pfalz D.XII, but its beautifully shaped planked fuselage made it a robust opponent that was capable of absorbing all the rigours of front line service.
Vfw Emil Schape by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 The exploits of the partnership of McKeever and Powell in their 11 Squadron Bristol F.2B made them perhaps the most celebrated of all the Bristol Fighter crews, McKeever himself becoming the highest scoring exponent of this classic type with a closing tally of 31 victories. Powell was to secure a further 19 kills before both were withdrawn from front line service to Home Establishment in January 1918. Whilst on a lone patrol above enemy lines in November 1917, their aircraft (A7288) was attacked by two German two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts, four of which were sent to the ground through a combination of superb airmanship and outstanding gunnery. The remaining German aircraft continued to give chase until the F.2B was down to less than 20ft above the British trenches, at which point the Germans broke off their attack and fled.
Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 By British standards, the colour schemes of many Felixstowe flying boats were unusually garish during the closing months of World War 1, but there was a simple logic to this choice of livery: A downed aircraft would be easily visible in a dark sea and even when in combat with its German counterparts, it could be easily identified, both by friendly aircraft and by ships below. F.3 N4258 sported this red and white chequerboard pattern, whilst others wore stripes or zig-zags, this example being based at Felixstowe Naval Air Station in the late Summer of 1918.
Felixstowe F.3 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Just as the name Zeppelin had become the common term for almost every German airship that ventured over Britain, so the name Gotha became generically used for the enemy bombers that droned across the English Channel during 1917-1918, inflicting considerable damage to coastal ports and the capital. As the massed raids of Bombengeschwader 3 increased, a public inquiry in England brought about the formation of the Royal Air Force as an independent service to counter this new threat and fighters from Europe were brought home to defend against these marauding giants. As a result, heavy losses on the German side meant that daylight raids had to be abandoned and all operations were henceforth conducted by night. Here, a pair of Gotha G.Vs begin to turn for home as searchlights play fruitlessly over distant fires, the grim result of another successful nights work.
Gothas Moon by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£35.00
 The LFG Roland D.VI did not enjoy the success of its contemporaries, the Fokker D.VII and Pfalz D.XII, but was nonetheless a potent and capable fighter. Its unique Klinkerrumpf  fuselage construction made it both lightweight and robust although, despite its qualities, it was not built in large numbers. This particular example, a D.VIa, is shown chasing down a damaged Sopwith Camel  whilst being flown by Gefreiter Jakob Tischner of Jasta 35b. Tischner later wrote off this aircraft in a landing accident when he rolled into a parked Pfalz D.III, destroying both machines.
Gefreiter Jakob Tischner - Roland D.VIa by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 For so large a machine, production of the Handley Page 0/400 was considerable with over 400 examples being delivered by the time of the Armistice in 1918. Its first missions were carried out during April of that year, operating both during daylight and by night. Here, three machines are being readied for a sortie. As final checks are completed on the nearest aircraft, some last minute engine maintenance is being carried out on a similar machine in the middle distance. The furthest example is being towed, with its vast wings folded, to the dispersal.
Handley Page 0/400s by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 The potential value of aircraft at sea had been proven as early as the Battle of Jutland in 1916 and many experiments were undertaken to provide all significant warships with their own aircraft for spotting and reconnaissance purposes. One solution widely adopted was the fitting of flying-off platforms to the main guns, as demonstrated here, as a Sopwith 1½ strutter is launched from HMS Warspite in 1919.
Sopwith 1 ½ Strutter by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£130.00
 The Italian Caproni series of bombers were the first to carry out long range missions during World War 1, frequently making round trips of over 150 miles in freezing conditions to deliver their meagre 1000lb bomb load on Austro-Hungarian targets. Here, a pair of Ca.3s return home, their gunners keeping a watchful eye for enemy fighters. The aerial gunners were particularly exposed to the sub-zero slipstream and often found it almost impossible to operate their guns because they were so cold, the rear gunners position being especially unpleasant due to his proximity to the mid engine and propeller that was just inches from his feet.
Caproni Ca.3 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.
Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Opening his victory tally by shooting down a Sopwith Camel in July 1917, von Boenigk proved himself to be a fine airman and a keen marksman by claiming a further five enemy aircraft by the end of that year. He continued to score steadily until the wars end, being credited with an eventual 26 kills. He went on to serve in the Luftwaffe during World War II, attaining the rank of Major-General, but was taken prisoner by the Russians in 1945 and died in captivity the following year. He is shown here in Pfalz D.III 1936/17 whilst serving with Jasta 4, whose aircraft were immediately recognisable by the black spiral ribbon applied to their fuselages. Von Boenigk is believed to have scored seven of his victories in this machine.
Oberleutnant Oskar Freiherr von Boenigk by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 The distinctive blue and red livery of these two Albatros D.Vs identify them as Jasta 18 machines in Berthold Colours, a reference to their commander at that time, Oblt Rudolf Berthold. The nearest aircraft is that of Leutnant der Reserve Paul Strahle who scored six victories with this unit before taking his aircraft (4594/17) with him to Jasta 57 where he would score a further 8. Each aircraft carried a personal emblem, in the case of Strahle a white axe whilst the similar aircraft of Ltn d R Arthur Rahn displays a diamond pattern. The fuselage crosses on both aircraft were crudely painted over and are still just visible beneath the blue.
Leutnant d R Paul Strahle by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger.
Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£130.00
 Although not as well known as the Gotha series of bombers, the Allgemeine Elektricitats-Gessellschaft G.IV acquitted itself well in the closing stages of World War 1, although its limited fuel load restricted it to short range duties and reconnaissance missions. The G.IV was popular with its crews because it was extremely robust and featured such state of the art developments as onboard radios and electrically-heated flying suits and was an easy aircraft to fly. Kampfgeschwader 4 are specially noted for flying their G.IVs up to seven missions a night on the Italian front.
AEG G.IV by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£120.00
 Australian by birth and serving with the New Zealand army in the middle east at the outbreak of World War 1, Arthur Coningham joined the RFC in 1917 and was posted to 32 Squadron, flying DH.2s, as depicted here. It was in such a machine that Coningham scored the first of his 14 victories, sending down a German two seater over Ervillers. He survived the war and was made AOC Desert Air Force in 1941 before taking command of 2nd Tactical Air Force until the Second World War's end whereupon he became Air Marshal and was awarded a knighthood. He died in January 1948.
Major Arthur Coningham by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 On 8th October 1914, war in the air changed forever with what would become the first successful strategic bombing raid on Germany. As bad weather threatened to frustrate their mission, two little Sopwith Tabloids took off in search of the giant Zeppelin sheds at Cologne and Dusseldorf, one piloted by Squadron Commander D A Spenser Grey and the other by Flight Lieutenant Reggie Marix. Grey was beaten by poor visibility and instead chose to bomb the railway station at Cologne whilst Marix located the primary target and bombed it at once from a height of just 600ft. Almost immediately, the mighty LZ.25 that was housed inside began to burn and then blew up spectacularly, the fireball threatening to engulf Marixs Tabloid. Both Marix and Grey were awarded the Distinguished Service Order for their efforts. The age of aerial bombing had arrived.
Flight Lieutenant R L G Marix by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Standing just five feet two inches tall, Andrew Beauchamp-Proctor had to have his SE5a specially modified to accommodate his small stature, but the diminutive South African was a giant in the air, claiming a total of 54 victories before the end of the war, many of them observation balloons which made him one of the top balloon-busting aces of the RFC. But many aircraft fell to his guns, too, as here when on 21st August 1918 he claimed an Albatros C-Type as victory number 34 whilst flying D6856 of 84 Squadron.
Captain Andrew Beauchamp-Proctor by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Based on the two-seat Rumpler C.1, the 6.B was an elegant single-seat fighter with a top speed of 153 km/h and a range of four hours flying time.  Armament was a single Spandau synchronised machine gun mounted on the port side of the Mercedes D.III engine. Quite modern-looking by the standards of the day, it was introduced into service in 1916, but large scale production was never undertaken and fewer than 100 examples of the 6.B-1 and 6.B-2 were built. The type did however enjoy a long service career with both the German and Finnish air forces, some serving until as late as the 1920s.
Rumpler 6.B by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 The Austro-Hungarian Lloyd C.V was a two-seat observation aircraft which was unconventional both in appearance and construction. Its unusually-shaped wings were not fabric covered, but were laminated in plywood for strength and lightness. This innovation, however, caused great problems with maintenance, battle damage repair and structural fatigue caused by moisture building up inside the wing section. Despite its faults, the C.V was a fast and streamlined machine that acquitted itself well during its brief career, 144 of the type being produced by the Lloyd and WKF factories in 1917.
Lloyd C.V by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Designed in 1913 and constructed by the Russo-Baltic Carriage Factory in Riga, the Ilya Muromets was designed by the great Igor Sikorski, based on his earlier creation, the Bolshoi Baltiski.  Conceived originally as a luxury passenger aircraft, it was to become the worlds first four-engined strategic bomber at the outbreak of World War 1 and featured a fully enclosed cabin for the pilots and internal bomb racks that could carry up to 800kg of bombs. 73 examples of this extremely successful aircraft were built and only one was lost due to enemy action during the 400 sorties flown, during which their bombing accuracy was claimed to have achieved a commendable 90 percent success rate.
Sikorski Ilya Muromets by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Arriving in France in 1917 with little or no air gunnery training behind him, Captain Arthur Harry Cobby went on to become the Australian Flying Corps highest scoring ace with 29 victories to his credit, five of them observation balloons. He is shown here in Sopwith Camel E1416 of 4 Sqn AFC (formerly 71 Sqn AFC) having downed one of his final victims, a Fokker D.VII on 4th September 1918. Cobby survived the Great War and served in the RAAF during the inter war period and World War Two, eventually leaving the service as Air Commodore CBE. He died in 1955.
Captain Arthur Henry Cobby by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 With a wingspan of 42.2 metres, the mighty Zeppelin Staaken series of bombers were truly awesome, living up to their name Riesenflugzeug - Giant Aircraft. Unusually for this period, the crew compartment of the R VI was fully enclosed and the bomb load was carried internally. The four engines were mounted in tandem pairs, two pushing and two pulling, which eliminated the need for complex gearing, and the flight engineers sat in cockpits in the engine nacelles. This example is shown limping home, its rear port engine stopped and smoking, escorted by its Little Friend, an Albatros D.V.  The painting shows the Staaken bomber is quite badly shot up. There are bullet holes all over the port wings, tailplane and rudder, as well as the engine trailing smoke from a small oil fire in the nacelle, which the engineer is keeping an eye on.
Kleiner Freund - Zeppelin Staaken R.VI by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£120.00
 Having successfully weaved and dodged the hail of bullets from the defensive guns of the German Zeppelin, Lieutenant Warneford climbed above the giant airship and prepared for a run along the full length of the LZ.37 in the hope that his 20lb bombs would turn it into an inferno and bring it down. Warneford had time to release all six of his bombs, the last of which set off a chain of eruptions that resulted in the Zeppelin breaking its back before plunging to earth in a fireball. So violent was the initial explosion that Warnefords tiny Morane Saulnier Type L was flipped over and thrust 200ft into the air above the disintegrating leviathan. Warneford survived this historic interception, whilst the LZ.37 plunged to the ground near Ghent and was completely destroyed. This was the first time that a Zeppelin had been brought down by an aircraft for which gallant action, Warneford was awarded the Victoria Cross. Special mention should be made of the roundels on the Type L, where the original French examples were not overpainted to British colours on the wings, unlike those on the fuselage sides.
Lieutenant Reginald Warneford by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£135.00
 Based upon the design of an earlier 1913 racing biplane, Aviatik AG were able to introduce their B.1 into military service almost at the outbreak of World War 1, the type proving to be a useful reconnaissance machine during the early stages of the conflict. As with most B type aircraft of this time, the Aviatik B.1 was unarmed and carried an observer in the forward cockpit. Power was provided by a Mercedes D.1 inline engine whose large radiators were fitted to the port side of the fuselage, just above the lower wing. There is no record of exactly how many B.1s were constructed.
Aviatik B.1 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 One of the few rules of aerial combat that were established in the First World War was to attack, where possible, with the sun behind you, thus using the element of surprise both to appear as if from nowhere and to blind your opponent to minimise retaliation. Just such a tactic has been successfully employed here as a DH.2 rakes the tail of Staffelfuhrer Hauptmann Rudolf Kleines Kasta 3 LFG Roland C.II as it returns from a patrol in the skies above northern France in 1916. Known affectionately as The Whale, the C.II was extensively streamlined and the positioning of the cockpits and wing cut-outs afforded both the pilot and observer unequalled views in all directions. Power was supplied by a 160hp Mercedes D.III engine and armament was a 7.92mm Spandau in front of the pilot and a 7.92mm Parabellum for the observer.
Out Of The Sun - LFG Roland C.II by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 At the outbreak of World War 1, the true potential of the aeroplane as an observation and reconnaissance platform had yet to be fully realised and many types were hurriedly drafted in and put to good use. Whilst the ubiquitous and bird-like Etrich Taube accounted for almost half of Germanys compliment of observation aircraft, the Bavarian army adopted this pusher bipane designed and built by Gustav Otto of Munich. Based on a floatplane of similar configuration and powered by a Rapp engine, this basic machine helped to usher in a new age of aerial reconnaissance. The company of Gustav Otto Flugmuschinen-Werke was later to become AGO Flugzeugwerke GmbH (Actien - Gesellschaft Otto)
Otto Pusher Type M by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 The Kaiserliche Marine operated a number of seaplane types during World War 1 of which the Friedrichshafen FF.33 was quite typical. Powered by a Benz Bz.III 150hp inline engine, this version was equipped with radio and a Parabellum gun for the observer in the rear cockpit, as well as a small bombload, which made it ideal for attacks on light coastal shipping.
Friedrichshafen FF.33 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Resplendent in the striking colours of the Austro-Hungarian Navy, a pair of Phonix D.I fighters are depicted on patrol in the late Spring of 1918. Although largely unpopular with pilots, the type acquitted itself well in service, possessing a superior rate of climb to the Albatross D.III, superb stability and a very low stall speed. A significant number of victories were achieved on the type and many examples were still in service at the end of the war in November 1918.
Phonix D.I by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£125.00
 In response to a German Navy requirement for a floatplane version of their successful G.1 bomber, Gotha produced just one example of the Ursinus Wasser Doppeldecker, or UWD. The aircraft proved to be easy to fly with good take off and landing characteristics and was capable of carrying a considerable payload. On an unknown date in 1916, the UWD took part in a raid on Dover with four Friedrichshafen FF.33s, inflicting some damage to military installations in the area and returning safely. Despite this, Gotha UWD no 120/15 was written off by the navy early in October that same year. No further examples were built.
Gotha UWD by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 At the outbreak of World War 1, AGO Flugzeugwerke GmbH had not endeared itself to the architects of the German war machine due to the flimsiness of some of its designs, coupled with poor workmanship. When the C.1 first appeared in 1915, it attracted little interest and yet went on to prove itself to be a robust and useful aircraft, its pusher design dispensing with the now traditional open framework to support the tail in favour of twin streamlined tailbooms. The observer / gunner in the nose enjoyed an unrivalled field of view, although the engines position immediately behind the pilot was always a concern in the event of a crash. This aircraft, LF181, transferred from the Fliegertrouppe to the navy in 1915 and was based at Nieuwmunster, shown here in an exchange with an FE.2b in the skies over Belgium.
AGO C.1 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Linienschiffsleutnant Gottfried Freiherr von Banfield was one of the top scoring aces of the Austro-Hungarian Empire with 9 confirmed and 11 unconfirmed victories to his credit and was awarded the Empires highest order, the Knights Cross of the Order of Maria Theresa for his achievements.  In February 1916 he was put in command of the naval air station at Trieste, a post that he held until the end of the war.  He is shown here with his observer, Seekadett Heribert Strobl Edler von Ravensberg, having just claimed his first victory, an Italian observation balloon near the mouth of the Isonzo River on 27th June 1915, flying his Lohner Type T, L.47.
Gottfried von Banfield by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£125.00
 In response to a requirement for a seaplane fighter scout, Albatros developed the elegant W.4, a direct descendent of their successful D.1, incorporating many common parts with its land-based relative. About 120 of the type were constructed, many employed in the defence of important naval bases scattered along the coast of the North Sea. A small number of W.4s however fell into the hands of the Soviet Red Army in 1918 and were pressed into service on the Black Sea, based at Sevastopol, as depicted here.
Albatros W.4 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£125.00
 Set against a spectacular Alpine backdrop, a pair of Aviatik D.1s of Flik 17/D are shown on patrol in March 1918, the nearest aircraft being that of Zugsfuhrer F Korty-Lalitz. When first entering service, the D.1 was praised by its pilots for possessing an excellent climb rate and outstanding performance, but its woeful lack of synchronised armament and poor forward visibility compromised the D.1s ability to meet its enemies on equal terms, these examples being armed only with a single over-wing Schwarzlose M7/16 or M16 machine gun.
F Korty-Lalitz, Aviatik D.1 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 Designed the brothers Henri and Maurice Farman, the F.40 embodied many of the features of contemporary designs comprising a crew nacelle with pusher propeller and a tail supported by narrow booms and struts. Forty French squadrons were equipped with the type which first entered service in 1915 but, just one year later, they were being withdrawn as rapid developments in fighter design rendered them obsolete. One such example is shown here having surprised a single-seat Taube observation aircraft, which is spotting above some abandoned trenches near a crashed Albatros C.III. The F.40s prominent position for the gunner / observer was one of its qualities and, it is said, inspired the German AGO company when designing their C.1.
Farman F.40 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£125.00
 With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284.
Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£140.00
 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.
Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£130.00
 The highest scoring allied ace of World War 1, Rene Fonck was born on 27th March 1894 and spent his early military service with the 11th Regiment of Engineers before being sent for flying instruction in the spring of 1915. Almost as soon as he had been assigned to combat duties, he began to score and was posted to Groupe de Combat No12, the famous Storks where a combination of superb airmanship and deadly accurate gunnery ensured that his victory tally continued to grow. By the end of the war, Fonck was credited with a commendable 75 confirmed victories, but it is likely that he may have been responsible for a further possible 69 kills, which would have taken his total score to 144 -  64 more than Manfred von Richthofen, the notorious Red Baron. Capitaine Rene Fonck is shown in one of his Spad S.XIIIs chasing down a DFW C-Type.
Capitaine Rene Fonck by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
 On the morning of 21st April 1917, coastal airship No C.17 was on a routine patrol captained by Sub Lieutenant  E G O Jackson, when sometime around 8.00am, she was attacked by German seaplanes and shot down. Such was their vulnerability that these huge battlebags were an easy target for marauding enemy scouts, their single Lewis guns achieving little by way of defence. The Hansa Brandenburg W.12, on the other hand, was a nimble and useful aircraft that the Germans put to good use in the coastal defence role.
Hansa Brandenburg W.12 - Attack on the C.17 by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£145.00
Based on a design by Henry Farman, the Bristol Boxkite first appeared in 1910 and was put into service with the RFC from its formation in 1912. It was used extensively by RNAS training schools at Eastbourne, Eastchurch and Hendon, but the type was withdrawn from service in 1915 due to obsolescence. Military versions were distinguishable from production aircraft by having extended upper wings to increase lift under load, as depicted here.
Bristol Boxkite by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£125.00
 On the 20th of April 1918, just one day before his death, the legendary Red Baron, Mannfred von Richthofen, claimed his final victory.  His famous Flying Circus was engaged in battle by Sopwith Camels of No.3 and No.201 Squadron.  Claiming his 79th victory, he had shot down Major Richard Raymond-Barker earlier in the dogfight - the British pilot being killed in the resulting crash.  However, it is his 80th and final victory that is depicted here.  In the centre of the painting, the Sopwith Camel of David Lewis has been brought into the firing line of von Richthofen, and is about to be sent down in flames from the sky - Lewis was fortunate to survive the encounter relatively unscathed.  Meanwhile the chaos of the dogfight is all around this duel, with aircraft of both sides wheeling and diving in combat.  The other pilots depicted are Weiss, Bell, Riley, Steinhauser, Mohnicke, Hamilton and Wenzl.
The Final Curtain by Ivan Berryman. (GS)Click For Details£300.00
 On the morning of 13th April 1917, five RE8s of 59 Sqn, RFC, took off from their base at La Bellevue on a photographic sortie, A3203 carrying a camera, with the other four flying as escorts.  Spads of 19 Sqn and some 52 Sqn Fe.2s were to have joined them as fighter cover, but the rendezvous was never made and the RE8s found themselves alone.  For some unknown reason, this flight of aircraft seemed to have drifted some way north of their intended target - and into the clutches of a group of Jasta 11 Albatros scouts, led by none other than Baron Manfred von Richthofen.  In a relatively short combat, all five RE8s were shot down by their German opponents, one by the Red Baron himself and two by his brother, Lothar, who claimed his fourth and fifth victims, thus becoming an ace, the others being downed by Festner and Wolff in similar aircraft.  For the Red Baron, this was a day of particular significance.  Not only had he now scored more victories than his mentor, Oswald Boelcke, by shooting down his 41st victim, he was later to claim a further two victories that same day - his first triple.  He is depicted here flying Albatros D.III Nr.2253/17.
Brothers in Arms by Ivan Berryman.Click For Details£80.00


This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: