Battle of the Pyramids
21st July 1798

Battle of the Pyramids, 21st July 1798

Battle of the Pyramids

Napoleon with an army of 36,000 seized Malta on the 10th of June 1798 form the Knights of St John then sailed on to land west of Alexandria on July 1st. They seized Alexandria form the Mameluke ruler Ibrahim who fled into Syria.

But the Mameluke military Commander Murad Bey was determined to stop Napoleon entering Cairo, so blocked the French advance at Embabeh on the left bank of the Nile near the pyramids. Under his command he had 40,000 troops but only 6,000 of these were the fierce fighting force of Mamelukes.

On July 21st napoleon moved onto the Egyptian positions and Murad launched an all out attack with his cavalry. But the 6,000 Mamelukes were no match for the French infantry and artillery which fired volley after volley, devastating the Mamelukes. When the charge had failed the disorganized Egyptian infantry fled. With only 300 casualties, Napoleon marched into Cairo.

OUR RECOMMENDATION FOR THIS BATTLE

Napoleons Speech to his Army before the Battle of the Pyramids by Antoine-Jean Gros (GL)

GE17981GL. Napoleons Speech to his Army before the Battle of the Pyramids by Antoine-Jean Gros.

Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints.

Image size 40 inches x 28 inches (102cm x 71cm)

Price : £500.00

Battle of the Pyramids Art Prints

Napoleon with an army of 36,000 seized Malta on the 10th of June 1798 form the Knights of St John then sailed on to land west of Alexandria on July 1st.  They seized Alexandria form the Mameluke ruler Ibrahim who fled into Syria.  But the Mameluke military Commander Murad Bey was determined to stop Napoleon entering Cairo, so blocked the French advance at Embabeh on the left bank of the Nile near the pyramids.  Under his command he had 40,000 troops but only 6,000 of these were the fierce fighting force of Mamelukes. On July 21st napoleon moved onto the Egyptian positions and Murad launched an all out attack with his cavalry.  But the 6,000 Mamelukes were no match for the French infantry and artillery which fired volley after volley, devastating the Mamelukes.  When the charge had failed the disorganized Egyptian infantry fled.  With only 300 casualties, Napoleon marched into Cairo.Battle of the Pyramids 21st July 1798 by Louis Lejeune.Click For DetailsDHM0054
GE17981GL.  Napoleons Speech to his Army before the Battle of the Pyramids by Antoine-Jean Gros. Napoleons Speech to his Army before the Battle of the Pyramids by Antoine-Jean Gros (GL)Click For DetailsGE17981
Napoleon enters Cairo, on the 22nd July 1798 after his victory against the Egyptian army at the Battle of the pyramids on July 21st.   Napoleon with an army of 36,000 seized Malta on the 10th of June 1798 form the Knights of St John then sailed on to land wets of Alexandria on July 1st.  They seized Alexandria form the Mameluke ruler Ibrahim who fled into Syria. But the Mameluke military Commander Murad Bey was determined to stop napoleon entering cairo  so blocked the French advance at Embabeh on the left bank of the Nile near the pyramids. Under his command he had 40,000 troops but only 6,000 of these were the fierce fighting force of Mamelukes.  On July 21st napoleon moved onto the Egyptian positions and Murad launched an all out attack with his cavalry. but the 6,000 Mamelukes were no match for the French Infantry and Artillery which fired volley after volley. which devastated the Mamelukes, when the charge had failed the disorganized Egyptian Infantry fled.  With only 300 casualties napoleon marched onto Cairo. Napoleons Entry into Cairo by Gustave Bourgain (GL)Click For DetailsGIAA1703
OUR RECOMMENDATION FOR THIS BATTLE





Price : £

Battle of the Pyramids

Battle of the Pyramids

Napoleon with an army of 36,000 seized Malta on the 10th of June 1798 form the Knights of St John then sailed on to land west of Alexandria on July 1st. They seized Alexandria form the Mameluke ruler Ibrahim who fled into Syria.

But the Mameluke military Commander Murad Bey was determined to stop Napoleon entering Cairo, so blocked the French advance at Embabeh on the left bank of the Nile near the pyramids. Under his command he had 40,000 troops but only 6,000 of these were the fierce fighting force of Mamelukes.

On July 21st napoleon moved onto the Egyptian positions and Murad launched an all out attack with his cavalry. But the 6,000 Mamelukes were no match for the French infantry and artillery which fired volley after volley, devastating the Mamelukes. When the charge had failed the disorganized Egyptian infantry fled. With only 300 casualties, Napoleon marched into Cairo.

Source :

 

AVIATION PRINTS

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1st June 1940 - <i>Pete</i> Peters fights off an overwhelming attack over Dunkirk and destroys three fighters.  Anson MKV flown by pilot officer Phillip Peters was leading a patrol of three Ansons of No.500 Royal Auxiliary Air Force Squadron over Dunkirk at the time the British Expeditionary Force was evacuating from the beaches.  He was flying at around 50ft when his mid upper gunner reported that nine Bf109s were attacking. Dropping to wave-top height the slow obsolescent twin engined aircraft tried to shake off their pursuers.  Two planes were severely damaged and Peters sent them home, leaving his own aircraft at the mercy of the enemy fighters.  It was at this point that Peters was grateful for his 'secret weapons'.  In addition to the Anson's nose gun and mid upper turret, guns had been fitted projecting out of the sides of the aircraft's long 'greenhouse' cabin. The extra guns were manned by the co-pilot and wireless operator. By throttling back and executing a number of skid turns Peters was able to out manoeuvre the enemy and allow his crew to fire on the attackers.  The first Bf109 was finished off with the nose gun as it did a stall turn in front off the aircraft. The second was shot down into the sea.  A third attacker sustained heavy damage and turned tail with the other pursuers.  Peters set course for Detling.  The news of the battle went on ahead of his arrival and he was greeted by applause and cheering of the squadron personnel.  When the aircraft was inspected, only one bullet hole was found. It wasn't until later when he had his parachute repacked that another armour piercing bullet was found lodged in the silk.  For the attack and morale boosting effect for the rest of the squadron, Peters was awarded the DFC.  The remaining crew, Sergeant Spencer, Corporal Smith, Leading Aircraftsman Dillnutt and Leading Aircraftsman Cunningham all received the Distinguished Flying Medal.

Improbable Victory by Tim Fisher (P)
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A Royal Air Force Wessex HC2 Helicopter picks up troops somewhere in Northern Ireland.

Pup Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins (P)
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 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.

Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical.  Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England.
Top Dressing in New Zealand (1)†by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 10th May 1972. Lt. Curt Dose together with his RIO, LCDR Jim McDevitt line up their F-4J Phantom prior to landing on the USS Constellation following their first successful target CAP of the day. During this mission they claimed a MiG-21F after a ultra-low level supersonic flight over the North Vietnamese airfield of Kep, northeast of Hanoi.
Silver Kite 211 by Philip West. (Y)
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  D for Donald of 270 squadron, Royal Air Force, out of Freetown, West Africa operating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was during routine operation search that D for Donald surprised U515 on the surface and immediately attacked the submarine. U515 in putting up stiff resistance blew a large hole in the hull of D for Donald and the magazine of the starboard side 0.5 twin Browning was hit and the subsequent shrapnel wounded both blister gunners. U515 escaped but was sunk by an American naval hunter group a year later. D for Donald limped back to base and managed to make the beach before it would sink completely.
Catalina Attack by John Wynne Hopkins (B)
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 Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns from 16 Squadron, RAF Coltishall launches the Jaguar into another breathtaking display sequence.

Enter the Saint by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
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 A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943.  Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties.

A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman.
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NAVAL PRINTS

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Viewed across the damaged stern of the 80-gun San Nicholas, Nelson drives HMS Captain onto the Spanish vessel in order that she can be boarded and taken as a prize, the British marines and men scrambling up the Captains bowsprit to use it as a bridge. The San Nicholas then fouled the Spanish three decker San Joseph (112), allowing Nelson and his men to take both ships as prizes in a single manoeuvre. A British frigate is moving into a supporting position in the middle distance.

HMS Captain at the Battle of Cape St Vincent by Ivan Berryman (P)
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 Type 21 frigate HMS Ambuscade (F172) is shown passing the swing bridge as she enters Taranto Harbour.

HMS Ambuscade by Ivan Berryman (P)
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 Admiral Cuthbert Collingwoods flagship the Royal Sovereign comes under intense fire from the black-painted Spanish 3-decker, Santa Ana, and the French 74 Fougueux, just prior to breaking through the Franco-Spanish line at Trafalgar.
HMS Royal Sovereign by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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B64.  HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman.
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 Spitfire of 761 Training Squadron (attached to the Royal Navy) flies over the Forth Railway Bridge on the eve of World War Two, also shown is HMS Royal Oak departing Rosyth for the open sea.

Land, Sea and Air by Ivan Berryman. (C)
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Showing visible signs of her tangle with British cruisers at the Battle of the River Plate, the German pocket battleship Graf Spee slips into the neutral waters of the Montevideo roadstead accompanied by the Uruguayan gunboat Rio Negro for light repairs. (Damage can be seen on the hull and behind the Conning tower ) . This was to be the last haven for the Graf Spee which was later scuttled at the harbour mouth, her commander Kapitan zur See Langsdorff believing a large British fleet to be waiting for attempted escape into the South Atlantic.

Admiral Graf Spee enters Montevideo by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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The Pedestal Convoy of August 1942 was one of the most heavily protected convoys in the history of sea warfare.  Fourteen of the fastest cargo ships of the time were protected by 4 carriers, 2 battleships, 7 cruisers and 32 destroyers.  The destroyer HMS Ashanti is in the foreground of the painting.  Also depicted are the carrier HMS Indomitable, with her Hurricanes cirling the convoy overhead, and the cargoe ship Port Chalmers to the right of the picture.

Pedestal Convoy by Anthony Saunders (B)
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 The view across Battleship Row, viewed from above Ford Island as the USS Nevada gallantly makes her break for the open sea, coming under heavy attack from Japanese A6M2s from the carrier Hiryu. The Nevada was eventually too badly damaged to continue and was beached to avoid blocking the harbour entrance. In the immediate foreground, the lightly damaged USS Tennessee is trapped inboard of USS West Virginia which has sunk at her moorings, leaking burning oil and hampering the daring operations to pluck trapped crew members from her decks, while just visible to the right is the stern of the USS Maryland and the capsized Oklahoma.
Attack on Pearl Harbor by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

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 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

D-Day Gold Beach, 6th June 1944 by Simon Smith.
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 Normandy, Mid-June 1944.  A REME Leyland Retriever mobile workshop truck and M7 Priest SP gun of 33rd Field Regiment, Royal Artillery, 3rd Infantry Division, disembark from an LST at one of the <i>Whale</i> floating roadways that made up the British Mulberry B harbour at Arromanches.

Arromanches by David Pentland. (P)
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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

Lance-Corporal Harry Nichols, 3rd battalion Grenadier Guards, winning the Victoria Cross at the River Escaut, 21st May 1940 by David Rowlands. (Y)
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CC089. Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.

Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.
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 Having made contact the previous evening with troops of 4th Infantry Division pushing inland from Utah Beach, paratroopers of the 101st Airborne division The Screaming Eagles help mop up the pockets of German resistance in their general advance towards Carentan.

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
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 After suppressing the initial German defences, the Sherman Crab flail tank of Lance Sgt Johnson, 3 Troop C Squadron the 22nd Dragoons, 79th Armoured Division,  clears a path through a minefield to allow tanks of 27th Armoured Brigade, and men of 3rd Infantry Division to breakout  from the beaches. Fire support from surviving Sherman DD (amphibious) tanks of 13th /18th Hussars (QMO), proved invaluable in the initial push towards Caen

D-Day, Sword Beach, Normandy 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
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Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
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 88mm AA guns of the 23rd Flak Regiment, used as anti-tank guns by orders of Rommel himself, are shown firing on British Matilda tanks of 4th/7th Royal Tank Regiment.

Action at Arras, France, 21st May 1940 by David Pentland. (Y)
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