Battle of Kassassin
28th August 1882

Battle of Kassassin, 28th August 1882

At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Graham's force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called "Midnight Charge". Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.

OUR RECOMMENDATION FOR THIS BATTLE

Charge at Kassassin, 1882 by Henry Dupray (P)

HD24. Charge at Kassassin, 1882 by Henry Dupray.

Antique print c.1890 mounted on thick card at the time.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

Price : £80.00

Battle of Kassassin Art Prints

At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Grahams force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called Midnight Charge. Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.The Charge of Drury Lowes Cavalry at Kassassin, August 28th 1882 by Christopher Clark.Click For DetailsANT0095
At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Grahams force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called Midnight Charge. Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.Kassassin Charge of the Household Cavalry by J Richards.Click For DetailsDHM0124
HD24.  Charge at Kassassin, 1882 by Henry Dupray.  Charge at Kassassin, 1882 by Henry Dupray (P)Click For DetailsHD0024
OUR RECOMMENDATION FOR THIS BATTLE

Kassassin Charge of the Household Cavalry by J Richards.

DHM124. Kassassin Charge of the Household Cavalry by J Richards.

At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Grahams force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called Midnight Charge. Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.

SOLD OUT.

Open edition print.

Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)

Price : £

Battle of Kassassin

When the Arabi rebellion broke out in Egypt in June 1882, almost absolute anarchy reigned in Cairo and Alexandria. At that time there were computed to be living in Egypt 37,000 Europeans, and the fortifying of Alexandria continuing to be proceeded with in spite of the protests of the English and French governments, the late Admiral Beauchamp Seymour, afterwards Lord Alcester, threatened to bombard the forts, after the English people had be warned to leave the country. All the world knows how this threat was carried out, and the subsequent proceedings in which the Life Guards bore a distinguished part.

At Tel-El-Mahuta, on 25th August, Arabi had succeeded in constructing his first dam across the Suez canal in pursuance of his design for cutting off the principal supply of water to the greater part of the country. The troops under Wolseley consisted of three squadrons of Household Cavalry, two guns and about 1,000 infantry; the force opposed to them was about 10,000. The water in the canal was getting dangerously low. Sir Garnet as he was then, determined to capture the dam and sent two squadrons against it. They dashed at the task with such fiery elan and with such success that Wolseley was moved to admiration, and recorded the fact in his dispatch describing the affair. "Under the bursting shells the colossal troopers sat like statues amid a conflagration" (this was at the beginning of the battle, and some of the men and horses had only been landed the day before) "as quietly as they had been wont to sit a short time before in the arched gateways of Whitehall." It was said that Wolseley had no great opinion of the Life and Horse Guards' powers of endurance, or indeed of their use at all, and it was with the idea of proving them that he directed them to charge and take Arabi's dam.

At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Graham's force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called "Midnight Charge". Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.

The decisive battle of the campaign was fought on the 13th September at Tel-el-Kebir. The Life Guards bore their share in the fight, which was chiefly confined to the pursuing and the cutting off of the enemy. The battle, however, was not of lengthy duration. From the time the enemy opened fire until he was in full retreat, only about half an hour elapsed; but into that short space a deal of hard and splendid fighting took place. The Egyptians were certainly taken by surprise, despite the fact that they slept fully armed and behind earthworks, for Arabi told the officer who took him to Ceylon as a prisoner, that when our men delivered the attack he himself was in bed; and complained that they did not leave him time enough even to get his boots on. Arabi's army was in consequence of this crushing defeat, completely broken up, and the British entered Cairo the next day. In October the Life Guards returned to England.

In 1884 they went again to Egypt and took part in the Nile Expedition, mounted on Camels. Their uniform when actually on service in Egypt consisted of grey "jumpers," yellow cord breeches, dark blue "putties" and white helmets, brown ankle boots and belts. It did not take long for the gallant troopers to get used to the "gawd-forsaken oont" although the beast was not looked upon altogether with favour. Of course the camels were used simply as a means of locomotion and not as chargers.

The Life Guards shared with their comrades the sickening jam produced by the fanatics' rush on the square at Abu Klea, when it was desperate hand to hand fighting. The Heavy Camel Corps composed of detachments from the Life Guards and other heavy regiments occupied the rear face of the left rear angle of the square, when the troops moved to within 500 yards from the enemy's position, as marked by their flags, a horde of Arabs rose suddenly out of cover and went straight at the square. The Mounted Infantry, on the left face, poured such a scathing fire upon them that they swerved round the left flank and dashed furiously upon the Life Guards. The onslaught was so tremendous that the Guards and their comrades were borne back and their line assumed the form almost of a semicircle. Only sheer bayonet work was possible. The crush was terrific, numbers of camels were killed, and were used as rallying points and as shelter by the soldiers; and the reek of powder and clouds of dust added to the confusion. For about 15 minutes this lasted, and during that time Colonel Burnaby, who went into action with a double-barrelled sporting gun, was killed, his jugular vein being cut through by a spear. Support was forthcoming, however, and shoulder to shoulder the gallant British soldiers simply swept back the black stream, and killed every single man that had penetrated their lines. After the Arabs were driven off 800 of their dead were found inside the square. The British loss was very heavy, for out of 1,800 men there were 9 officers and 65 men killed, and 85 wounded, among the latter being only 2 officers of the Life Guards. But the heaviest loss fell upon the Heavy Camel Corps, six of whose officers were killed. A portion of the Heavy Camel Corps took part in the march of Stewart's Column across the desert from Corti to Metammeh and back which no less an authority but Von Moltke declared to be the work not only of soldiers, but of heroes.

Source :

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Spitfire L1000 (DW-R) of No.610 Sqn is terminally damaged by an Me109 over Dunkirk on 29th May 1940.  The Spitfire pilot, Flying Officer Gerald Kerr is listed is missing after this combat.

Kerrs Last Combat by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £280.00
 Two Fairey Firefly fighter-bombers of 810 Sqn, Fleet Air Arm, overfly the carrier HMS Theseus during the Korean War.

HMS Theseus by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 Depicting the No.19 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IIA of Flt Lt Walter Lawson attacking a a Bf.109 E-4 of JG.3 in the Summer of 1940. The final tally of Lawson before he was listed as missing in August 1941 was 6 confirmed, 1 shared, 3 probables and 1 damaged.  The Bf.109 shown here was flown by Oberleutnant Franz von Werra. He survived this encounter, but was shot down over Kent in September 1940.

Flt Lt Walter Lawson by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Depicting the morning after a gruelling operation during the autumn of 1944. As day breaks a returning crew awaits the crew bus at their aircraft dispersal, grouped before their mighty bomber which shows fresh scars of battle from an arduous mission over occupied Europe. The exhausted men are clearly relieved and thankful to be safely home at their in Lincolnshire base.

Mission Completed by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £125.00

 Of similar configuration, but usually outclassed by its British contemporary, the Bristol F2b, the Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG was essentially a strong and stable observation aircraft that served widely during World War 1. On 21st May 1917, this example became the victim of the guns of Sergeant John H Jones, contributing to his eventual tally of 15 victories. Here, his pilot that day, Captain W G Mostyn, has already had a squirt using his forward-firing Vickers gun before manoeuvring their 22 Sqn machine into position for Jones to finish the job with his twin Lewis guns.

Sergeant John H Jones and pilot Captain W G Mostyn, Bristol F2b Fighter claiming a Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 With the morning sun glinting on their fuselages, P-51 Mustangs of the 78th Fighter Group cross the Dutch coastline far below, as they head back towards their base at Duxford, England at the end of a long sweep east of the Rhine crossing, Spring 1945.  The final months of the war in Europe lie ahead, and for the P-51 pilots victory is within sight.  Finally, after years of toil, the sky was theirs.

Opening Sky by Robert Taylor.
Half Price! - £125.00
 2 Mk7 Lynx of 664/661 sqn. AAc, providing Top Cover for an UN PROFOR Convoy in Bosnia Herzegovina.

Op Grapple by John Wynne Hopkins.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Phantom II of US Marine Corps, VMFA-531 (Grey Ghosts) Vietnam, Danang April 1965.

Phantom II by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 One of the most advanced submarines in the world, the nuclear-powered HMS Astute (S119) is depicted making her way into the open sea from her base at Faslane.  Commissioned into the Royal Navy on 27th August 2010, Astute is capable of carrying 38 Tomahawk Block IV cruise missiles over virtually unlimited distances.

HMS Astute by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
VAR344B.  H.M.A.S. Nizam 1943 by Brian Wood.
H.M.A.S. Nizam 1943 by Brian Wood (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
The pride of the British fleet, The Mighty Hood as she was known, was launched in 1918.  Weighing in at over 40,000 tons she was 860 feet long and had eight 15 inch guns, at her launch she was more than a match for any adversary.  Hood sailed the world in the inter-war years and was admired in every foreign port she visited, however with a lack of major refits in this time the second world war found the Hood unprepared for a major battle,  On the 24th of May 1941 the German battleship Bismarck found Hoods achilles heel within only a few salvos, namely her inadequate deck armour.  Hood exploded in a huge fireball from which only three sailors survived.  Here HMS Hood is seen with Force H in the Mediterranean.  Winston Churchill knew that the powerful French fleet at Mers-el-Kebir could fall into German hands at any time and that the threat had to be removed by any means.  On the 3rd of July 1940 the French fleet was duly dispatched by Force H.  The Strasbourg being the only French battleship able to make her escape.  Hodd is depicted opening fire at 17.55 hours with the battleships Resolution and the destroyer HMS Foxhound to her stern.

HMS Hood - Operation Catapult by Anthony Saunders (P)
Half Price! - £3200.00
Bismarck, now complete and newly painted in full Baltic camouflage, returns to Hamburg for the last time as the harsh winter of 1940/41 relents and the pride of the German Kriegsmarine prepares for real action.  In the distance, the pre-Dreadnought Schleswig-Holstein awaits her next commission, the old ship alternating between vital ice-breaker and air defence duties at this time.  The Bismarck would in May 1941 put to sea and engage and sink HMS Hood only to be caught by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  Bismarck was pounded into a floating wreck, finally being sunk by the torpedoes of HMS Dorsetshire.  From her crew of 2300 only 110 would be rescued by HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori.

Bismarck Entering Hamburg Harbour by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00

 Under lowering arctic skies HMS Belfast (Admiral Burnets Flagship) leads HMS Sheffield and HMS Norfolk in the race to protect convoy JW55B from Scharnhorst.

HMS Belfast During the Battle of North Cape by Randall Wilson. (Y)
Half Price! - £230.00
 Ships of the South Atlantic Task Force gather in San Carlos water during the Falklands Campaign of 1982. LCMs from HMS Fearless (L10) manoeuvre around their mother ship, with the logistic Ship RFA Sir Galahad (L3005) and the frigate HMS Argonaut (F56) in close attendance.

HMS Fearless by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
 Late October 1942 in the waters east of Guadalcanal, the Battle of Santa Cruz saw the sinking of the US carrier Hornet, in what proved to be the last major carrier battle of the South Pacific theatre.

USS Hornet, Eye of the Storm by Anthony Saunders
Half Price! - £40.00
 None among Rackams crew were more resolute or ready to board or undertake anything that was hazardous. Quote taken from Captain C. Johnsons book. A General History of the Robberies and murders of the Most Notorious Pirates. (1724)

Anne Bonney, Mary Reid and Calico Jack Rackam by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £115.00
 Men of the US 381st Infantry Regiment, 96th Division supported by the tanks of 763rd and 713th Flamethrower Tank Battalions, during the assault on Yaeju Dake. This escarpment, known as Big Apple was the last in a series of tough Japanese defence lines on the south of the Island.

Taking of Big Apple, Okinawa, 10th - 14th June 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 M2A4 and M3 tanks of A Company, 1st US Marine Tank Battalion. move out from Henderson Field to support the perimeter from Japanese attacks.

Guadalcanal by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £295.00
  Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe.  No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 Hauptsturm fuhrer Fritz Klingenberg, and the men of 2nd SS Divisions Motorcycle Reconnaissance battalion stop at the swollen banks of the River Danube. The following day he and six men, a broken down radio, and totally unsupported were to capture the Yugoslavian capital of Belgrade.

The Magician, Balkans, 11th April 1941 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
 Preussisch Stargard, East Prussia, February 1945.  Following the departure  of the platoon's two other vehicles, after expending all their ammunition, the single Jagdpanther of Oberfeldwebel Hermann Bix remained to cover the withdrawal of all supporting infantry in the area.  Hidden behind a muck heap, with only twenty armour piercing and five high explosive shells remaining he made the attacking Soviet Shermans pay a heavy price, destroying sixteen of their number before he too fell back out of ammunition.

The Rearguard by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Oberfeldwebel Albert Kerscher, commander of 2nd company 511 Heavy Tank Battalion aided by a Panzer IV, two Hetzers, a Kingtiger and a Pak gun, successfully defended against concerted Soviet air and armoured attacks, his action buying valuable time for the evacuation of German wounded from Pilau and scoring his 100th victory in the process.

Kerschers Defence of Neuhauser Forest by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £120.00
 Under pressure from Stalin to open a second front in Europe, Operation Jubilee was designed ostensibly as a reconnaissance in force on the French coast, to show the feasibility of taking and holding a major defended port for a day, in this case Dieppe. The plan devised by Lord Louis Mountbatten failed due to inadequate naval and air support, carrying out the landing in daylight and general lack of intelligence of the target. Here new Churchill tanks of the 14th Canadian Tank Regiment (The Calgary Regiment), with men of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and Fusiliers Mont-Royals, struggle to fight their way off the beach. Only a handful of men penetrated into the town itself, and eventually the remaining troops were ordered to withdraw. Out of 5086 soldiers who landed only 1443 returned.

Disaster at Dieppe, France, 19th August 1942 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: