Battle of Kassassin
28th August 1882

Battle of Kassassin, 28th August 1882

At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Graham's force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called "Midnight Charge". Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.

OUR RECOMMENDATION FOR THIS BATTLE

Charge at Kassassin, 1882 by Henry Dupray (P)

HD24. Charge at Kassassin, 1882 by Henry Dupray.

Antique print c.1890 mounted on thick card at the time.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

Price : £80.00

Battle of Kassassin Art Prints

At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Grahams force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called Midnight Charge. Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.The Charge of Drury Lowes Cavalry at Kassassin, August 28th 1882 by Christopher Clark.Click For DetailsANT0095
At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Grahams force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called Midnight Charge. Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.Kassassin Charge of the Household Cavalry by J Richards.Click For DetailsDHM0124
HD24.  Charge at Kassassin, 1882 by Henry Dupray.  Charge at Kassassin, 1882 by Henry Dupray (P)Click For DetailsHD0024
OUR RECOMMENDATION FOR THIS BATTLE

Kassassin Charge of the Household Cavalry by J Richards.

DHM124. Kassassin Charge of the Household Cavalry by J Richards.

At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Grahams force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called Midnight Charge. Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.

SOLD OUT.

Open edition print.

Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)

Price : £

Battle of Kassassin

When the Arabi rebellion broke out in Egypt in June 1882, almost absolute anarchy reigned in Cairo and Alexandria. At that time there were computed to be living in Egypt 37,000 Europeans, and the fortifying of Alexandria continuing to be proceeded with in spite of the protests of the English and French governments, the late Admiral Beauchamp Seymour, afterwards Lord Alcester, threatened to bombard the forts, after the English people had be warned to leave the country. All the world knows how this threat was carried out, and the subsequent proceedings in which the Life Guards bore a distinguished part.

At Tel-El-Mahuta, on 25th August, Arabi had succeeded in constructing his first dam across the Suez canal in pursuance of his design for cutting off the principal supply of water to the greater part of the country. The troops under Wolseley consisted of three squadrons of Household Cavalry, two guns and about 1,000 infantry; the force opposed to them was about 10,000. The water in the canal was getting dangerously low. Sir Garnet as he was then, determined to capture the dam and sent two squadrons against it. They dashed at the task with such fiery elan and with such success that Wolseley was moved to admiration, and recorded the fact in his dispatch describing the affair. "Under the bursting shells the colossal troopers sat like statues amid a conflagration" (this was at the beginning of the battle, and some of the men and horses had only been landed the day before) "as quietly as they had been wont to sit a short time before in the arched gateways of Whitehall." It was said that Wolseley had no great opinion of the Life and Horse Guards' powers of endurance, or indeed of their use at all, and it was with the idea of proving them that he directed them to charge and take Arabi's dam.

At Kassassin on the 28th August, General Graham's force was vigorously attacked by the Egyptians. He signalled for assistance, which was afforded him by the Life Guards and the Blues with the Horse Artillery, and the 7th Dragoon Guards. Then came the so-called "Midnight Charge". Considering that the attack was not seriously begun till 4.30 p.m., and that General Graham ordered a general return to camp at 8.45 p.m., the title is certainly a misnomer. When they arrived near enough to the scene of the conflict for bullets to drop among the troopers, they halted just to breathe the tired horses, and then came the order to charge. Like a thunderbolt, furious and irresistible, the heavy troopers rode for the enemy. A terrible scene of slaughter and confusion ensued; the enemy fled in great disorder, and the battle was won.

The decisive battle of the campaign was fought on the 13th September at Tel-el-Kebir. The Life Guards bore their share in the fight, which was chiefly confined to the pursuing and the cutting off of the enemy. The battle, however, was not of lengthy duration. From the time the enemy opened fire until he was in full retreat, only about half an hour elapsed; but into that short space a deal of hard and splendid fighting took place. The Egyptians were certainly taken by surprise, despite the fact that they slept fully armed and behind earthworks, for Arabi told the officer who took him to Ceylon as a prisoner, that when our men delivered the attack he himself was in bed; and complained that they did not leave him time enough even to get his boots on. Arabi's army was in consequence of this crushing defeat, completely broken up, and the British entered Cairo the next day. In October the Life Guards returned to England.

In 1884 they went again to Egypt and took part in the Nile Expedition, mounted on Camels. Their uniform when actually on service in Egypt consisted of grey "jumpers," yellow cord breeches, dark blue "putties" and white helmets, brown ankle boots and belts. It did not take long for the gallant troopers to get used to the "gawd-forsaken oont" although the beast was not looked upon altogether with favour. Of course the camels were used simply as a means of locomotion and not as chargers.

The Life Guards shared with their comrades the sickening jam produced by the fanatics' rush on the square at Abu Klea, when it was desperate hand to hand fighting. The Heavy Camel Corps composed of detachments from the Life Guards and other heavy regiments occupied the rear face of the left rear angle of the square, when the troops moved to within 500 yards from the enemy's position, as marked by their flags, a horde of Arabs rose suddenly out of cover and went straight at the square. The Mounted Infantry, on the left face, poured such a scathing fire upon them that they swerved round the left flank and dashed furiously upon the Life Guards. The onslaught was so tremendous that the Guards and their comrades were borne back and their line assumed the form almost of a semicircle. Only sheer bayonet work was possible. The crush was terrific, numbers of camels were killed, and were used as rallying points and as shelter by the soldiers; and the reek of powder and clouds of dust added to the confusion. For about 15 minutes this lasted, and during that time Colonel Burnaby, who went into action with a double-barrelled sporting gun, was killed, his jugular vein being cut through by a spear. Support was forthcoming, however, and shoulder to shoulder the gallant British soldiers simply swept back the black stream, and killed every single man that had penetrated their lines. After the Arabs were driven off 800 of their dead were found inside the square. The British loss was very heavy, for out of 1,800 men there were 9 officers and 65 men killed, and 85 wounded, among the latter being only 2 officers of the Life Guards. But the heaviest loss fell upon the Heavy Camel Corps, six of whose officers were killed. A portion of the Heavy Camel Corps took part in the march of Stewart's Column across the desert from Corti to Metammeh and back which no less an authority but Von Moltke declared to be the work not only of soldiers, but of heroes.

Source :

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 A pair of De Havilland Mosquito NF. MkII night fighters of 23 Squadron, based at Bradwell Bay, Essex in 1942.

Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Half Price! - £110.00
 One of 6,176 Halifaxes built during World War II, NA337(2P-X) was shot down over Norway on 23rd April 1945. In 1995 it was recovered from the lake that had been its watery home for fifty years and has now been restored by the Halifax Aircraft Association in Ontario, Canada.

Halifax Mk.III NA337 by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Half Price! - £110.00
 Albatros DV piloted by Austro-Hungarian Ace Lt. Josef Kiss, Austrian Alps in December 1917.

Christmas Kiss - Albatros DV by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £24.00
 US Air Force F15 Eagle over flys British Challenger Tank during the Gulf War.
Gulf Buddies by Geoff Lea.
Half Price! - £50.00

 Focke-Wulf FW.190A-5/U8 of 1 Gruppe, Schnellkampfgeschwader 10 in 1943. All national markings were painted out, except for the call sign C on the fuselage and repeated, crudely sprayed, on the engine cowling.

Focke-Wulf Fw190A-5/U8 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Routine, though essential, maintenance is carried out on a 501 Sqn Hurricane at the height of the Battle of Britain during the Summer of 1940.† Hurricane P3059 <i>SD-N</i> in the background is the aircraft of Group Captain Byron Duckenfield (deceased).

Ground Force by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Half Price! - £100.00
 A moment during the fraught encounter on 27th May 1940 over Dunkirk between Spitfires of 610 Sqn and an estimated 40 Bf.110s during which three Zerstorers were shot down.

A Dunkirk Encounter†by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £270.00
Depicting the morning after a gruelling operation during the autumn of 1944. As day breaks a returning crew awaits the crew bus at their aircraft dispersal, grouped before their mighty bomber which shows fresh scars of battle from an arduous mission over occupied Europe. The exhausted men are clearly relieved and thankful to be safely home at their in Lincolnshire base.

Mission Completed by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £125.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman. The submarine HMS Thunderbolt moves away from the depot ship Montcalm.  Another submarine, HMS Swordfish is alongside for resupply.

HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Key ships of the British task Force sail in close formation in the Mediterranean Sea during the build-up to the coalition liberation of Iraq in march 2003. Ships pictured left to right, include ATS Argus (A135), a Type 42 destroyer in the extreme distance, the flagship HMS ark Royal (RO7), RFA Orangeleaf (A110), LSL Sir Percival (L3036), the Commando and helicopter carrier HMS ocean (L12) and the Type 42 destroyer HMS Liverpool (D92)†

NTG03 - Task Force to Iraq by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
On 17th June 1944, 780 miles west of Saipan in Mid Pacific, the Gato class submarine USS Cavalla dives after a lucky sighting of a Japanese Naval Task Force, which included the aircraft carriers Taiho, Shokaku and Zuikaku. The Cavalla then trailed the Japanese, attacking and sinking the Shokaku on the 19th.

A Chance Encounter by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £35.00
B219.  Deutschland Passing Through the Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman.

Deutschland Passing Through the Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00

  The heavy cruiser HMS Dorsetshire is brought up to sink the blazing wreck of the Bismarck with torpedoes at around 10:30 hours on the morning of May 27th 1941.  The once proud German ship had been ruthlessly pounded into a twisted and burning wreck by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori combed the area of the sinking for survivors, between them picking up a total of 110 out of an original complement of 2,300.

HMS Dorsetshire by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £2900.00
The Pedestal Convoy of August 1942 was one of the most heavily protected convoys in the history of sea warfare.  Fourteen of the fastest cargo ships of the time were protected by 4 carriers, 2 battleships, 7 cruisers and 32 destroyers.  The destroyer HMS Ashanti is in the foreground of the painting.  Also depicted are the carrier HMS Indomitable, with her Hurricanes cirling the convoy overhead, and the cargoe ship Port Chalmers to the right of the picture.

Pedestal Convoy by Anthony Saunders (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
B69.  HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth at Alexandria by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth at Alexandria by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 The pride of the Royal Navy, HMS Hood, leaves Portsmouth on her way to the Fleet Review of King George V in July 1935. HMS Hood is followed by the destroyer HMS Express.

HMS Hood and HMS Express Departing from Portsmouth 1935 by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

  Panzer IVF2 tanks of 6th Panzer Division, Panzer Armee Hoth, attempt to fight their way through to the beleaguered Sixth Army at Stalingrad, 12th December 1942.  On the 21st the operation was abandoned when the expected breakout from Stalingrad failed to materialise, the relief column was only 25 miles from the city.

Operation Winter Tempest by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Polish 7TP (Twin Turret) light tank of Captain F. Michalowskis training company breaks out from the street barricade to counter attack German reconnaissance elements.

Warsaw, September 1939 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe. No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Men of the US 381st Infantry Regiment, 96th Division supported by the tanks of 763rd and 713th Flamethrower Tank Battalions, during the assault on Yaeju Dake. This escarpment, known as Big Apple was the last in a series of tough Japanese defence lines on the south of the Island.

Taking of Big Apple, Okinawa, 10th - 14th June 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Stug Mk.III
Stug and Motorbike†by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £340.00
 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

D-Day Gold Beach, 6th June 1944 by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £75.00
 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £115.00

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: