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DHM005. The Charge of the 21st Lancers at the Battle of Omdurman by Richard Caton Woodville. <p>Depicting the charge of the Lancers against what they first thought was a small group of Dervishes, but was in fact thousands hidden in a depression in the desert. The Lancers had to ride straight through. For this bravery three Victoria crosses were won. The 21st lancers lost 5 officers and 65 men with 120 horses lost. Winston Churchill was one of the Officers who survived the charge.  <b><p> Open edition print. <p> Image size 21 inches x 14 inches (53cm x 36cm)
DHM111.  The Battle of Abuklea by William Barnes Wollen. <p>At the moment the Mahdists broke into the corner of the square against the Heavy Camel Regiment. 17th January 1885.  Interesting note: a detachment of two officers and 44 men from the Scots Greys formed part of the Camel Corps in Egypt, and went through the desert march and took part in the battle of Abu Klea. At that affair one officer and 12 men were killed and three more men died of disease. <b><p> Open edition print.  <p>Image size 23 inches x 14 inches (58cm x 36cm)

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Pack 588. Pack of two British Colonial Wars prints by Richard Caton Woodville and William Barnes Wollen.

PCK0588. Pack of two British Colonial art prints by Richard Caton Woodville and William Barnes Wollen, depicting the Battle of Omdurman and the Battle of Abuklea.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM005. The Charge of the 21st Lancers at the Battle of Omdurman by Richard Caton Woodville.

Depicting the charge of the Lancers against what they first thought was a small group of Dervishes, but was in fact thousands hidden in a depression in the desert. The Lancers had to ride straight through. For this bravery three Victoria crosses were won. The 21st lancers lost 5 officers and 65 men with 120 horses lost. Winston Churchill was one of the Officers who survived the charge.

Open edition print.

Image size 21 inches x 14 inches (53cm x 36cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM111. The Battle of Abuklea by William Barnes Wollen.

At the moment the Mahdists broke into the corner of the square against the Heavy Camel Regiment. 17th January 1885. Interesting note: a detachment of two officers and 44 men from the Scots Greys formed part of the Camel Corps in Egypt, and went through the desert march and took part in the battle of Abu Klea. At that affair one officer and 12 men were killed and three more men died of disease.

Open edition print.

Image size 23 inches x 14 inches (58cm x 36cm)


Website Price: 65.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost 111.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save 46




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Artist Details : William Barnes Wollen
Click here for a full list of all artwork by William Barnes Wollen


William Barnes Wollen

William Barnes Wollen in his studio, 1902. He is working on the painting of the Imperial Light Horse at Elandslaagte


Born Leipzig, Germany 1857; died London 1936. Along with Woodville and Hillingford, Wollen may be regarded as one of the most prolific illustrators and artists of battle pictures of the late Victorian/early Edwardian era. He studied at the Slade School and exhibited his first picture at the Royal Academy in 1879. Two years later came his first military picture. The rescue of Private Andrews by Captain Garnet J. Wolseley ... at the storming of the Motee Mahal, Lucknow. Thereafter, he exhibited over thirty battle and campaign pictures at Burlington House, his last being in 1922. As was the case with his contemporaries, Wollen was attracted to the period of the Napoleonic Wars as a source for many of his pictures such as The Black Watch at bay, Quatre Bras (The Black Watch), The 28th at Waterloo (Bristol Museum and Art Gallery), Norman Ramsay at Fuentes Onoro and The 10th Hussars at Benevente. In 1898, he painted The last stand of the 44th Regiment at Gundamuck, 1842 (National Army Museum), but for the next five years, he devoted his work to depicting contemporary events, starting with The 21st Lancers at Omdurman (The Staff College), although he had painted The Battle of Abu Klea (National Army Museum) in 1896. During this period, he served in South Africa as a special artist for a new illustrated paper, The Sphere, and sent back numerous scenes from the war. Several oil paintings were a direct result of his experiences: The Imperial Light Horse at Waggon Hill, January 6, 1900, The Imperial Light Horse at Elandslaagte (Light Horse Regiment, South Africa), The Victoria Cross (Durban Art Museum) and The 1st Battalion South Lancashire Regiment, storming the Boer trenches at Pieter's Hill (Queen's Lancashire Regiment). With the end of the war, Wollen returned to painting retrospective battle/campaign pictures such as Scouts (The Royal Hussars) showing a patrol of the 10th Light Dragoons in the Peninsula, Ambushed (Sunderland Art Gallery), 18th century cavalry ambushed on a road, and The first fight for independence, depicting the engagement at Lexington Common during the American Revolution. The Great War inspired him to paint several canvases, notably Defeat of the Prussian Guard, Ypres, 1914 (Royal Green Jackets) The London Territorials at Pozieres (National Army Museum), and Semper Fidelis: the last stand of the 2nd Devons at Bois des Buttes, May 27th, 1918 (The Devon and Dorset Regiment). Wollen was also an active illustrator and painter in water-colours, exhibiting many pictures at the various London exhibitions.

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Artist Details : Richard Caton Woodville
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Caton Woodville

Richard Caton Woodville

WOODVILLE, Richard Caton Born London 1856; died there 1927. Woodville was the most prolific battle artist of the nineteenth and early twentieth century in Britain, producing countless oil paintings and drawings, many for the Illustrated London News. As was the case with several history painters of the Victorian period, he studied at Dusseldorf sometime with Wilhelm Camphausen, the great German military painter, and later in Paris. He experienced was first-hand in Albania and Montenegro towards the end of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, and later in Egypt during the war of 1882. During the latter conflict, he made numerous sketches and obtained photographs of the trenches at Tel-e-Kebir for his friend, the French military artist, Alphonse de Neuville (q.v.) who had been commissioned to paint a scene of the battle. The fruits of both their labours were shown at the Fine Art Society in 1883, Woodville, exhibiting The Moonlight Charge at Kassassin. In 1884, Woodville exhibited by Royal Command, another picture relating to the Egyptian War. The Guards at Tel-e-Kebir (Royal Collection). His first Royal Academy picture exhibited in 1879, was entitled Before Leuthen, Dec. 3rd, 1757. Thereafter, he was a frequent exhibitor at Burlington House, showing no less than 21 battle pictures, many dealing with contemporary events such as the Second Afghan War, Candahar (Private collection) and Maiwand; saving the Guns (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), the Zulu War - Prince Louis Napoleon in Zululand, and the Boer War - Lindley; Whitsunday 1900 (Oxfordshire Light Infantry Association), and Dawn of Majuba (Canadian Military Institute). He painted many historical recreations both in oil and water-colour including a series on famous British battles for the Illustrated London News. He depicted The Charge of the Light Brigade (Royal Collection, Madrid) and The Charge of the 21st Lancers at Omdurman (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), Blenheim, Badajos and several Waterloo pictures. During the Great War, he turned his talents to depicting the current events, three of which were exhibited at the Royal Academy. The 2nd Batt. Manchester Regiment taking six guns at dawn near St. Quentin (The Rings Regiment), Entry of the 5th Lancers into Mons (16th/5th Royal Lancers), and Halloween, 1914: Stand of the London Scottish on Messines Ridge (London Scottish Museum Trust) exhibited in the year of his death. During his life, he was the most popular artist of the genre and he was the subject of several articles in magazines and journals. He himself wrote some memoirs in 1914 entitled Random Recollections. He was deeply interested in the army and joined the Royal Berkshire Yeomanry Cavalry in 1879, staying with them until 1914 when he joined the National Reserve as a Captain.

More about Richard Caton Woodville

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