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One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
Military and aviation arist David Pentland.  His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Military and aviation arist David Pentland. His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
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STK0124B. Top Night Fighter by Stan Stokes. <p> Major Heinz Schnaufer, with 121 victories, was the top-scoring night fighter ace of all time. He became a Luftwaffe pilot in 1942 and obtained his first victory in June of that year. By August his victory count had reached twenty-two and he was put in command of the 9th Staffel of the IV/BJG1. On the evening of December 16, 1943 Schnaufer downed four RAF Lancaster 4-engine bombers, and on February 21, 1945 he claimed a total of nine Lancasters in one evening. He received the highest award which could be obtained, the Diamonds to the Knights Cross, upon attainment of his 100th victory. Schnaufer survived the War, but was killed in a motoring accident in 1950. As depicted by Stan Stokes in his dramatic painting entitled Top Night Fighter, Schnaufer, who primarily flew the night fighter version of the Messerschmitt Bf-110 Zerstorer, homes in on an RAF Lancaster heavy bomber. The Bf-110 grew out of Herman Gorings specifications for a multipurpose aircraft capable of penetrating deep into enemy airspace to clear the sky of enemy fighters in advance of German bomber formations. The aircraft would also be utilized as a long range interceptor, and as a ground support and ground attack bomber. The Bf-110 prototype first flew in 1936. The prototype was under powered with its Daimier Benz DB 600A engines. Several months passed before a go ahead was given for large scale production which commenced in 1938. Utilizing  improved DB 601 engines, the early production 110s were as fast as any single engine fighter at that time, and had superior fire power. Their biggest apparent weakness was in the areas of armor protection for the crew, and in terms of maneuverability when compared to single seat fighters. The 110 was produced in large numbers and in many different variants. The 110D was the long range model. An additional belly tank was fitted to that aircraft, with several later variants having the more traditional drop tanks. The first serious test for the Bf-110 came during the Battle of Britain. About 300 Bf-110s were involved. They became easy prey for Hurricane and Spitfire pilots, and Bf-109s were often required to assist the 110s in their own defense. On August 15, 1940, which became known as Black Tuesday, the Bf-110s were ravaged by the RAF, and for the month over 100 aircraft were lost. On the Eastern Front the Bf-110 performed admirably in the early stages of Operation Barbarossa. With the Soviet Air Force weakened in the first several weeks of the attack, 110s were effectively utilized in a ground attack role. Ultimately, the Luftwaffe re-equipped a significant number of its 110s as night fighters. The aircraft performed well in this role because it was a good gun platform with sufficient speed to overtake the RAF night bombers. Such night missions were typically carried out with no Allied fighter escort, so the 110 night fighters would not have to engage or elude Allied fighters in this role. <b><p>Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=936>Oberstleutnant Hans-Joachim Jabs (deceased)</a>. <p>225 prints from the signed limited edition of 4750 prints, with signature of Stan Stokes and pilot, and a remarque.<p>Image size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm)
NT0321AP. Night Hunters of the Reich by Nicolas Trudgian. <p>  The German High Command entered World War II with the notion that the war would be quickly won, and certainly without the need to fight at night.  The RAF changed all that when Bomber Command, having suffered appalling losses in daylight, turned to attacking under the cloak of darkness.  By mid-1940 the Luftwaffe was forced to hurriedly form its first night fighter wing utilising the Messerschmitt Bf110.  Without specialised equipment, initially Luftwaffe pilots relied on visual acquisition, detecting enemy aircraft with the aid of searchlights.  To combat intensifying RAF night attacks, new electronic methods of navigation and detection were developed, and by the end on 1942 the German night fighter force had almost 400 aircraft contesting the night skies.  Almost 1300 British aircraft were destroyed in that year alone.The Bf110G-4 of 47-night victory pilot Oberleutnant Martin Drewes at dusk in March 1944, heading out to intercept in-bound British four-engined bombers over north west Germany. Equipped with the latest FuG220 and 218 radars, the experienced crew will lie in wait, carefully choose their prey, stalk and close for the kill. The deadly game of hide and seek is about to begin. <b><p> Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=239>Oberst Wolfgang Falck (deceased)</a>, in addition to the artist. <p>Limited edition of artist proofs. <p>  Paper size 24 inches x 19 inches (61cm x 48cm)

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Jabs, Falck Me110 Night-Fighter Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Stan Stokes.

PCK1238. Jabs, Falck Me110 Night-Fighter Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Stan Stokes.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

STK0124B. Top Night Fighter by Stan Stokes.

Major Heinz Schnaufer, with 121 victories, was the top-scoring night fighter ace of all time. He became a Luftwaffe pilot in 1942 and obtained his first victory in June of that year. By August his victory count had reached twenty-two and he was put in command of the 9th Staffel of the IV/BJG1. On the evening of December 16, 1943 Schnaufer downed four RAF Lancaster 4-engine bombers, and on February 21, 1945 he claimed a total of nine Lancasters in one evening. He received the highest award which could be obtained, the Diamonds to the Knights Cross, upon attainment of his 100th victory. Schnaufer survived the War, but was killed in a motoring accident in 1950. As depicted by Stan Stokes in his dramatic painting entitled Top Night Fighter, Schnaufer, who primarily flew the night fighter version of the Messerschmitt Bf-110 Zerstorer, homes in on an RAF Lancaster heavy bomber. The Bf-110 grew out of Herman Gorings specifications for a multipurpose aircraft capable of penetrating deep into enemy airspace to clear the sky of enemy fighters in advance of German bomber formations. The aircraft would also be utilized as a long range interceptor, and as a ground support and ground attack bomber. The Bf-110 prototype first flew in 1936. The prototype was under powered with its Daimier Benz DB 600A engines. Several months passed before a go ahead was given for large scale production which commenced in 1938. Utilizing improved DB 601 engines, the early production 110s were as fast as any single engine fighter at that time, and had superior fire power. Their biggest apparent weakness was in the areas of armor protection for the crew, and in terms of maneuverability when compared to single seat fighters. The 110 was produced in large numbers and in many different variants. The 110D was the long range model. An additional belly tank was fitted to that aircraft, with several later variants having the more traditional drop tanks. The first serious test for the Bf-110 came during the Battle of Britain. About 300 Bf-110s were involved. They became easy prey for Hurricane and Spitfire pilots, and Bf-109s were often required to assist the 110s in their own defense. On August 15, 1940, which became known as Black Tuesday, the Bf-110s were ravaged by the RAF, and for the month over 100 aircraft were lost. On the Eastern Front the Bf-110 performed admirably in the early stages of Operation Barbarossa. With the Soviet Air Force weakened in the first several weeks of the attack, 110s were effectively utilized in a ground attack role. Ultimately, the Luftwaffe re-equipped a significant number of its 110s as night fighters. The aircraft performed well in this role because it was a good gun platform with sufficient speed to overtake the RAF night bombers. Such night missions were typically carried out with no Allied fighter escort, so the 110 night fighters would not have to engage or elude Allied fighters in this role.

Signed by Oberstleutnant Hans-Joachim Jabs (deceased).

225 prints from the signed limited edition of 4750 prints, with signature of Stan Stokes and pilot, and a remarque.

Image size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

NT0321AP. Night Hunters of the Reich by Nicolas Trudgian.

The German High Command entered World War II with the notion that the war would be quickly won, and certainly without the need to fight at night. The RAF changed all that when Bomber Command, having suffered appalling losses in daylight, turned to attacking under the cloak of darkness. By mid-1940 the Luftwaffe was forced to hurriedly form its first night fighter wing utilising the Messerschmitt Bf110. Without specialised equipment, initially Luftwaffe pilots relied on visual acquisition, detecting enemy aircraft with the aid of searchlights. To combat intensifying RAF night attacks, new electronic methods of navigation and detection were developed, and by the end on 1942 the German night fighter force had almost 400 aircraft contesting the night skies. Almost 1300 British aircraft were destroyed in that year alone.The Bf110G-4 of 47-night victory pilot Oberleutnant Martin Drewes at dusk in March 1944, heading out to intercept in-bound British four-engined bombers over north west Germany. Equipped with the latest FuG220 and 218 radars, the experienced crew will lie in wait, carefully choose their prey, stalk and close for the kill. The deadly game of hide and seek is about to begin.

Signed by Oberst Wolfgang Falck (deceased), in addition to the artist.

Limited edition of artist proofs.

Paper size 24 inches x 19 inches (61cm x 48cm)


Website Price: £ 230.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £319.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £89




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


The signature of Oberstleutnant Hans-Joachim Jabs (deceased)

Oberstleutnant Hans-Joachim Jabs (deceased)
After seeing combat as a pilot in Czechoslovakia and the great air battles over France and Belgium, Hans-Joachim Jabs flew the Messerschmitt Me110 Zerstorer throughout the Battle of Britain with II./ZG76 Sharks Gruppe. During this time he shot down eight Spitfires and four Hurricanes and was awarded the Knights Cross in October 1940. Hans-Joachim Jabs retrained as a night fighter pilot, briefly returning to daylight operations to escort the German capital ships on the famous Channel Dash. He became Kommandeur of IV./NJG1, and from March 1944, Kommodore. He was awarded Oak Leaves to the Knights Cross in March 1944. In April 1944 he acheived two remarkable day victories, both over Spitfires. Hans-Joachim Jabs flew 710 missions and scored 22 day and 28 night victories. Born 14th November 1917, died 26th October 2003. Born in Lubeck Germany in 1917, Han-Joachim Jabs, one of the highest scoring Bf- 110 aces to survive the War, joined the Luftwaffe in late 1936. He was originally trained as a Bf-109 pilot, but in March of 1940 he was transferred to ZG-76 which flew the Bf- 110, twin-engine fighter. Jabs honed his fighter pilot skills during the Battle of France, during which he downed four French fighters and two Spitfires, making him an ace. As the Battle of Britain commenced, most Bf-110s were initially assigned the role of escort for German bombers. Pitted against large numbers of Hurricanes and Spitfires flown by well-trained pilots of the RAF, many of these Zerstorer pilots would not survive the Battle of Britain. Hans-Joachim Jabs was an exception. He was one of the few German Bf-110 aces to attain numerous victories against Hurricanes and Spitfires during the Battle of Britain, during which he downed eight Spitfires and four Hurricanes. Downing the superior-performing Spitfires and Hurricanes in the twin-engine Bf-110 was considered by fellow Zerstorer pilots as the ultimate achievement of a fighter pilot. However, by mid 1941 it was very clear that the Bf-110 needed to be withdrawn from front-line daytime fighter service. Many 110s were retrofitted for the night fighter role, where the aircraft would not encounter fighter opposition. Jabs was retrained in late 1941, and he joined NJG-3 in the defense of Hamburg from the RAF night bombing attacks. He did participate in a daylight mission to provide air cover for the famed Channel Dash of the Prinz Eugen and several other capital ships. Jabs had few good scoring opportunities until he was transferred to NJG-1 operating in Holland. This unit was equipped with a later variant of the 110 with better radar and with heavier armament. Jabs night fighter score began to mount, with most of his victims being RAF bombers. By January of 1944 he had attained a total of 44 victories. He was promoted to Kommodore of NJG-1, but continued to fly missions with the men under his command. Major Heinz Schnaufer, the top-scoring night fighter ace of all-time, with 121 victories, served for a while under Jabs' command. While preparing to return from a mission on April 29, 1944, Jabs' 110 was jumped by several Spitfires. Turning into the enemy and firing with his long range cannons, Jabs bagged one the Spitfires, and temporarily sent the others scurrying. The Spitfires regrouped and once again Jabs turned into them and downed one of his pursuers. The ace's 110 had taken quite a few hits and Jabs now desperately tried to return to his base. He was able to land the badly shot-up aircraft and seek cover before the remaining Spitfires strafed his Zerstorer into a burning piece of rubble. Jabs' final victories came on the night of February 21, 1945, when he downed two Lancasters. Jabs total of fifty aerial victories, which included twenty-two daytime victories and twenty-eight night fighter victories were all attained in the Bf-110. Following the end of the War, Jabs began a new life as a businessman and public servant. Jabs married in 1940 and has two sons. He died 23th October 2003.
Signatures on item 2
NameInfo




Oberst Wolfgang Falck (deceased)
At the outbreak of war Wolfgang Falck was Staffelkapitan of 8,/JG132 flying the Bf110 Zerstorer in the Polish Campaign. In Feb 1940 he became Kommandeur 1./ZG1 and led it during the Western campaign. From June 1940 Falck was appointed Kommodore NJG1, the largest Geschwader in the Luftwaffe. During this time the greatest Luftwaffe night Aces were under his command. In July 1943 he joined the staff of Luftflotte Recih where he was responsible for the day and night fighter defence of the Reich. In the autumn of 1944 he was made Fighter Leader in the Balkans, and later became head of staff for flying training. Wolfgang Falck flew 90 operations and was awarded the Knight's Cross. Died 13th March 2007.
Artist Details : Nicolas Trudgian
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Nicolas Trudgian


Nicolas Trudgian

Cranston Fine Arts have now taken over all remaining stocks of Nicolas Trudgian prints from his previous publishers. We have made available a great many prints that had not been seen for many years, and have uncovered some rarities which lay unnoticed during this transition.

Having graduated from art college, Nicolas Trudgian spent many years as a professional illustrator before turning to a career in fine art painting. His crisp style of realism, attention to detail, compositional skills and bright use of colours, immediately found favour with collectors and demand for his original work soared on both sides of the Atlantic. Today, more than a decade after becoming a fine art painter, Nicolas Trudgian is firmly established within a tiny, elite group of aviation artists whose works are genuinely collected world-wide. When he paints an aircraft you can be sure he has researched it in every detail and when he puts it over a particular airfield, the chances are he has paid it a recent visit. Even when he paints a sunset over a tropical island, or mist hanging over a valley in China, most probably he has seen it with his own eyes. Nick was born and raised in the seafaring city of Plymouth, the port from which the Pilgrim Fathers set sail in 1620, and where Sir Francis Drake played bowls while awaiting the Spanish Armada. Growing up in a house close to the railway station within a busy military city, the harbour always teeming with naval vessels and the skies above resonating with the sounds of naval aircraft, it was not at all surprising the young Nick became fascinated with trains, boats and aircraft. It was from his father, himself a talented artist, that Nick acquired his love of drawing and surrounded by so much that was inspiring, there was never a shortage of ideas for pictures. His talent began to show at an early age and although he did well enough at school, he always spent a disproportionate amount of time drawing. People talked about him becoming a Naval officer or an architect but in 1975 Nick's mind was made up. When he told his careers teacher he wanted to go to art school the man said, 'Now come on, what do you really want to do? After leaving school Nick began a one-year foundation course at the Plymouth College of Art. Now armed with an impressive portfolio containing paintings of jet aircraft, trains, even wildlife, he was immediately accepted at every college he applied to join. He chose a course at the Falmouth College of Art in Cornwall specialising in technical illustration and paintings of machines and vehicles for industry. It was perfect for Nick, and he was to become one of the star pupils. One of the lecturers commented at the time: Every college needs someone with a talent like Nick to raise the standards sky high; he carried all the other students along with him, and created an effect which will last for years to come. Two weeks after leaving art college Nick blew every penny he had on a trip to South Africa to ride the great steam trains across the desert, sketching them at every opportunity. Returning to England, in best traditions of all young artists, he struggled to make a living. Paintings by an unknown artist didn't fetch much despite the painstaking effort and time Nick put into each work, so when the college he had recently left offered him a job as a lecturer, he jumped at the chance. The money was good and he discovered that he really enjoyed teaching. Throughout the 1970s Nick was much involved with a railway preservation society near Plymouth and it was through the railway society that he had his first pictures reproduced as prints. But Nick felt he needed to advance his career and in summer 1985 Nick moved away from Cornwall to join an energetic new design studio in Wiltshire. Here he painted detailed artwork for many major companies including Rolls Royce, General Motors, Volvo Trucks, Alfa Romeo and, to his delight, the aviation and defence industries. He remembers the job as exciting though stressful, often requiring him to work right through the night to meet a client's deadline. Here he learned to be disciplined and fast. Towards the end of the 1980's Nick had the chance to work for the Military Gallery. This was the break that for years he had been striving towards and with typical enthusiasm, flung himself into his new role. After completing a series of aviation posters, including a gigantic painting to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Royal Air Force, Nick's first aviation scene to be published as a limited edition was launched by the Military Gallery in 1991. Despite the fact he was unknown in the field, it was an immediate success. Over the past decade Nick has earned a special reputation for giving those who love his work much more than just aircraft in his paintings. He goes to enormous lengths with his backgrounds, filling them with interesting and accurate detail, all designed to help give the aircraft in his paintings a tremendous sense of location and purpose. His landscapes are quite breathtaking and his buildings demonstrate an uncanny knowledge of perspective but it is the hardware in his paintings which are most striking. Whether it is an aircraft, tank, petrol bowser, or tractor, Nick brings it to life with all the inordinate skill of a truly accomplished fine art painter. A prodigious researcher, Nick travels extensively in his constant quest for information and fresh ideas. He has visited India, China, South Africa, South America, the Caribbean and travels regularly to the United States and Canada. He likes nothing better than to be out and about with sketchbook at the ready and if there is an old steam train in the vicinity, well that's a bonus!

More about Nicolas Trudgian

Artist Details : Stan Stokes
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Stan Stokes


Stan Stokes

Stan Stokes is a California native with more than 37 years as a full time professional artist, who developed a passion for vintage cars, trains and airplanes at an early age. Model building and RC planes filled the many hours of the young enthusiasts free time. However, unlike most other young aviation enthusiasts Stokes also displayed a great gift for artistic talent. After studying art in College, Stan decided to pursue a career as a professional artist. Stokes initially focused his great talents on depicting uniquely realistic landscapes of the western desert and mountain scenes. More than thirty years ago a good friend suggested that Stan combine his passion for aviation history and flying with his artistic talents, and render an aircraft or two. The rest is history. Stan has won many prestigious awards including the Benedictine Art Award in 1975 and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museums Golden Age of Flight award in 1985. In May of 2000, Stan was honored with the National Museum of Naval Aviations R. G. Smith Award for Excellence in Naval Aviation Art. Commissioned by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California, Stans 12 x 120 foot mural of the History of the Flying White House is on permanent display in the Air Force One Pavilion. In addition Stans painting of the USS Ronald Reagan is hanging in the Legacy Room of the library. In 2005 Stan also completed a painting of our nations next aircraft carrier, the USS George H. W. Bush, which is on permanent display at the George H. W. Bush Presidential Library in College Station, Texas. Stan has also completed several impressive murals for the Palm Springs Air Museum including: The Tuskegee Airmen at 12 x 60 feet and contains 51 portraits of the original Tuskegee Airmen. Dauntless at Midway at 12 x 34 feet and Corsair on Approach at 19 x 55 feet. Stans work also hangs in the Air Force art collection, the Pentagon, San Diego Aerospace Museum, and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC. Stan has had the pleasure of meeting and working with many of his boyhood aviation heroes, including the late General Jimmy Doolittle, the late Pappy Boyington, Chuck Yeager, and many many others. A true aviation history buff, Stan often spends more time pouring over research materials for his paintings to assure their accuracy to the smallest detail than he does behind the canvas. Noted for his incredible detail and strikingly realistic illustration, Stans canvases have a life-like three-dimensional effect that often leaves viewers spellbound. Today his work encompasses not only aviation and space but also portraits, landscapes, ships, classic cars and his new collection of cat-related fine art paintings. Stan particularly enjoys the tough assignment. During his 37 years as a professional artist, he has been asked to produce literally hundreds of paintings documenting historical events, people and places. Although Stan has logged many hours flying his own airplanes, in recent years pleasure flying has had to take a backseat to the artistic demands of his backlog. Stan was commissioned to paint more than twenty original paintings for an aviation museum being in the Philippines. Since the mid-1980s NASA has also tapped Stans talents from time to time and he has completed more than fifteen paintings ranging from the space shuttles to the SR 71 Blackbird. Stan has also painted numerous works for the cutting edge genius in aviation and space design, Burt Rutan.

More about Stan Stokes

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

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 Arriving in France in 1917 with little or no air gunnery training behind him, Captain Arthur Harry Cobby went on to become the Australian Flying Corps highest scoring ace with 29 victories to his credit, five of them observation balloons. He is shown here in Sopwith Camel E1416 of 4 Sqn AFC (formerly 71 Sqn AFC) having downed one of his final victims, a Fokker D.VII on 4th September 1918. Cobby survived the Great War and served in the RAAF during the inter war period and World War Two, eventually leaving the service as Air Commodore CBE. He died in 1955.

Captain Arthur Henry Cobby by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00
Hurricane LK-M of No.87 Squadron piloted by Flt Lt Alex Thom DFC limps over the south coast of England on 19th August 1942. While supporting troops on the ground at Dieppe, the Hurricane was hit by ground fire and lost oil pressure. Alex Thom got the damaged aircraft back to Britain, making a forced landing at East Den. Ferried back to 87 Sqns airfield, he immediately set off once more for Dieppe in Hurricane LK-A.

A Welcome Shore by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
A surprise dive bombing attack at 12.45pm as Spitfires of 65 squadron were taking off. 148 bombs were dropped on the airfield and hangars. The entire squadron got airborne with one exception, its engine was stopped by the blast from one of the bombs.

Battle of Britain, Manston, 12th August 1940 by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £125.00
 British Midlands 737 (300 series) en route from London to Belfast. 1993.

Boeing 737 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00

 Squadron Leader J R Baldwin passes above a section of Mulberry Harbour near Arromanches, late in June 1944, his personalised Hawker Typhoon bearing the codes JBII.

JBII - Hawker Typhoon of Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00
 RAF Mosquitos attack a German supply train.

Mosquito Bite by Geoff Lea. (P)
Half Price! - £1400.00
 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00


A Tribute to Sir Thomas Sopwith by Roderick Lovejoy.
Half Price! - £70.00

NAVAL PRINTS

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 Launched on 3rd November 1986 and commissioned into the Royal Navy on 14th January 1989, HMS Trenchant (S91) was the fifth of the Trafalgar class nuclear powered submarines and was the first Royal Navy vessel to fire the Block IV Tomahawk cruise missile.  In addition to her complement of missiles, she is also equipped with Spearfish torpedoes and some of the most sophisticated data acquisition and underwater detection systems which allow her to monitor surface vessels undetected.

HMS Trenchant by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £750.00
 HMS Medway was the first Royal navy submarine Depot ship that was designed for the purpose from the outset. She is shown here with a quintet of T-class submarines on her starboard side, whilst an elderly L-Class begins  to move away having completed replenishment. HMS Medway was sunk on 30th June 1940 having been torpedoed by U-372 off Alexandria.

HMS Medway by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
HMS Ark Royal  part of Force H along with the Battleship HMS Renown and Cruiser HMS Sheffield departs Gibraltar to take part in the search for the Bismarck in the Atlantic. During the hunt HMS Ark Royal, Swordfish mistakenly attack the Royal Navy cruiser HMS Sheffiled. Fortunately, the torpedoes were not primed properly and crusier recieived no major damage. Spotter planes from HMS Ark Royal eventually found the Bismarck. and a attack commenced, crippling the Bismarcks rudder. The damage sustained lead to the rest of the Royal Navy surface fleet catching up with the Bismarck and sinking her. HMS ark Royal returns to the mediteranean. later on 13 November 1941: While on her return to Gibraltar in company with the HMS Malaya,  HMS Argus,  and HMS Hermione supported by Seven destroyers,  HMSArk Royal is attacked by the U-81  under the command of Kapitänleutnant Guggenberger  in the Mediterranean., and at 1541, a torpedo strikes the starboard side and the ship immediately takes a 10º list. within 20 minutes this list has increased to 18 degrees and Captain Maund orders all only essential crew to remain aboard  with the rest of the crew to abandon ship. Destroyer HMS  Legion under the command of Commander R. S. Jessel comes alongside and takes most of her crew on board, leaving 250 crew and t Captain Maund to try and save the ship but they have to also abndon ship,  and just 14 hours after the torpedo strike HMS Ark Royal  rolls over and sinks.  from the entire crew their was only only one fatality,Able Seaman E. Mitchell was killed.

HMS Ark Royal by Brian Wood (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00
 Admiral Cuthbert Collingwoods flagship the Royal Sovereign comes under intense fire from the black-painted Spanish 3-decker, Santa Ana, and the French 74 Fougueux, just prior to breaking through the Franco-Spanish line at Trafalgar.
HMS Royal Sovereign by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £625.00

 Showing visible signs of her tangle with British cruisers at the Battle of the River Plate, the German pocket battleship Graf Spee slips into the neutral waters of the Montevideo roadstead for light repairs.  This was to be the last haven for the Graf Spee which was later scuttled at the harbour mouth, her commander Kapitan zur See Langsdorff believing a large British fleet to be waiting for attempted escape into the South Atlantic.

Admiral Graf Spee by Ivan Berryman.
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VAR346B.  H.M.A.S. Manoora 1940 by Brian Wood.
H.M.A.S. Manoora 1940 by Brian Wood (B)
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 The largest and fastest of all the ships that took part in the Battle of Jutland, the elegant battle cruiser HMS Tiger was launched in 1913 and is easily recognisable by the unusual position of Q turret just aft of the third funnel, She is shown about  to pass beneath the Forth Bridge as she departs Rosyth for a sea trial

HMS Tiger by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 The Leander class cruiser HMS Orion is shown departing Grand Harbour Malta late in 1945.

HMS Orion by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £500.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

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Lieut. George Cairns of the South Staffordshire Regiment at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma, 13th March 1944, along with the 3rd/6th Gurkha Rifles.
Lieutenant George Cairns VC, at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma 13th March 1944 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £280.00
 St Mere Eglise, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  U.S. Paratroops of the 82nd <i>All American</i> Airborne Division, descend on occupied France.

First to Fight by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00
 During the morning of June 7th the 82nd Airborne were attacked by a mixed German battle group. Supported by 4th Division armour the Paratroopers and Glider troops repelled the attack which lasted most of the day.

Fighting for a Foothold, 82nd Airborne at St Mere Eglise, 1944 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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DHM341B. The Battle of Beda Fomm  by David Rowlands.

The Battle of Beda Fomm by David Rowlands (B)
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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

Lance-Corporal Harry Nichols, 3rd battalion Grenadier Guards, winning the Victoria Cross at the River Escaut, 21st May 1940 by David Rowlands. (Y)
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 Polish 7TP (Twin Turret) light tank of Captain F. Michalowskis training company breaks out from the street barricade to counter attack German reconnaissance elements.

Warsaw, September 1939 by David Pentland.
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 As 1944 drew to a close, Hitler made his final gamble of the war, mounting a massive strike force aimed at splitting the Allies forces advancing upon Germany. His armour, supported from the air, would rip through the Ardennes to Antwerp, capture the Allied fuel supplies, and cut off all the opposing forces to the north. Hitlers commanders were dubious of the outcome but nevertheless obeyed orders, and the operation was launched on 16th December. Allied intelligence had discounted any German counter-offensive and the initial wave, comprising 8 Panzer divisions, took the Allied forces completely by surprise. A parachute drop of English-speaking German soldiers in American uniforms behind the assault zone added to the confusion. Advancing some 30 miles, and almost in sight of the River Meuse, by 26th December the SS Panzers had ground to a halt with empty fuel tanks, and were at the mercy of Allied counter-attacks. By 16th January the German penetration was repulsed and Hitlers beloved Panzer units retreated in tatters. The Fuhrers last gamble had failed. Fw190s of JG1 provide close support to the 9th SS Panzer Division, as they spearhead Germanys final major offensive of World War II. Seen advancing on the 82nd Airborne Division, the King Tiger tanks, with the aid of Luftwaffe ground-attack fighters, drive the Americans back through the snowy fields of the Ardennes on Christmas Day, 1944. It was the last, short-lived and ultimately unsuccessful advance made by the German forces during World War II. <br><br><b>Published 2001.</b>

Ardennes Offensive by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
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 A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Müncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th april 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
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