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One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
Military and aviation arist David Pentland.  His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Military and aviation arist David Pentland. His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
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DHM2627AP. Fury of Assault by Robert Taylor. <p> When Luftwaffe bombers first appeared in force in the night skies over London in September 1940 they heralded the beginning of The Blitz - the most sustained period of concentrated bombing aimed at British cities during World War II. Robert Taylors evocative painting brings to life the frightening scenario of the Luftwaffes night bombing campaign. It is December 1941, and London is once again under concentrated attack. With fires raging below, the armada of German bombers is clearly visible in the night sky as they sweep across the city. Shimmering in the glow of destruction, a lone Hurricane night-fighter from 85 Squadron, based at nearby Gravesend, engages Heinkel 111s of KG55 in a desperate attempt to break up the formations. <b><p> Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=773>Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=769>Oberleutnant Joachim Berking</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=770>Unteroffizier Fahnenjunker Walter Bogdan</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=772>Oberleutnant Heinrich Sudel (deceased)</a><br> and <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=771>Oberleutnant Karl-Horst Meyer zum Felde</a>. <p> Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. <p> Paper size 29 inches x 23.5 inches (74cm x 60cm)
B0303AP. Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman. <p> <b><p>Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=1236>Group Captain Byron Duckenfield AFC (deceased)</a><br>and<br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=2065>Flight Lieutenant Alex Thom DFC</a>. <p>Limited edition of 100 artist proofs..<p>Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)

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  Website Price: £ 375.00  

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Hurricane / Heinkel Night Bombing Aviation Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.

PCK2163. Hurricane / Heinkel Night Bombing Aviation Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2627AP. Fury of Assault by Robert Taylor.

When Luftwaffe bombers first appeared in force in the night skies over London in September 1940 they heralded the beginning of The Blitz - the most sustained period of concentrated bombing aimed at British cities during World War II. Robert Taylors evocative painting brings to life the frightening scenario of the Luftwaffes night bombing campaign. It is December 1941, and London is once again under concentrated attack. With fires raging below, the armada of German bombers is clearly visible in the night sky as they sweep across the city. Shimmering in the glow of destruction, a lone Hurricane night-fighter from 85 Squadron, based at nearby Gravesend, engages Heinkel 111s of KG55 in a desperate attempt to break up the formations.

Signed by Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM,
Oberleutnant Joachim Berking,
Unteroffizier Fahnenjunker Walter Bogdan,
Oberleutnant Heinrich Sudel (deceased)
and
Oberleutnant Karl-Horst Meyer zum Felde.

Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.

Paper size 29 inches x 23.5 inches (74cm x 60cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

B0303AP. Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman.

Signed by Group Captain Byron Duckenfield AFC (deceased)
and
Flight Lieutenant Alex Thom DFC.

Limited edition of 100 artist proofs..

Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)


Website Price: £ 375.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £520.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £145




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo
Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFMRoy Daines joined the RAF as soon as he was able, and after completing his hurried training as a pilot, was posted to join 247 Squadron in the autumn of 1940. Here he flew Gladiators and Hurricanes on coastal patrols, 247 being the only squadron to fly Gladiators during the Battle of Britain, before converting to nightfighting Hurricanes. Later, in 1943, he flew Typhoons with 247 before being posted to join 65 Squadron flying Spitfires and Mustangs.


Oberleutnant Heinrich Sudel (deceased)
Having joined the Luftwaffe in 1937, Heinrich Sudel was an experienced Observer in He111s by the time war broke out. He flew a total of 408 combat missions in Heinkels, both in the West over France and England, and on the Eastern Front. In September 1940 whilst over England, his aircraft was badly damaged by RAF fighters, but his pilot managed to reach the safety of the French coast on one engine. He finished the war commanding L/KG55, and had been awarded the Knights Cross, the Iron Cross I and II, and the German Cross in Gold. Heinrich Sudel passed away on 12th August 2011.
Oberleutnant Joachim BerkingJoining the Luftwafte in November 1939, Joachim Berking was commissioned and trained as a pilot on Ju52s and He111s as part of KG53 based at Lille in northern France. In May 1942 he was posted to KG55 Grief in Russia, joining the 4th Staffel based in Djepropetrowsk, where he completed 291 combat missions, of which 60 were night operations. In November 1943 he returned to France to become head of training of 1 L/KG5 5 at Dijon. After this posting he converted to fighters, training on the Me109, and in April 1945 was posted to command 4./JG27 Marseille. He received the Iron Cross I and II, the German Cross in Gold, and a special honorary trophy from Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering for outstanding services in air combat.
Oberleutnant Karl-Horst Meyer zum FeldeWith a passion for flying Karl-Horst joined the Luftwafte in October 1938, and following the outbreak of war he flew night operations as a pilot with KG55 over France before taking part in the great Blitz raids over England. After the invasion of Russia he transferred to the Eastern Front and fought at Stalingrad, making several emergency landings including one major incident when, having lost an engine to enemy action, he made a forced landing on one engine in the countryside of south Russia, where he had to join German ground units. He flew both He111s and Ju88s during the war, and was awarded the German Cross in Gold.
Unteroffizier Fahnenjunker Walter BogdanWalter Bogdan joined the Luftwaffe in March 1941, and after completing his training as a radio operator, was posted to join KG55 flying Heinkel He111s. He flew over 110 combat missions in He111s as radio operator to Leutnant Kessler. On their seventh mission they were forced to make an emergency landing during the siege of Stalingrad, and in April 1944 encountered a second emergency landing on his 75th mission. His final and 110th mission occured in July 1944 when, attacking Brjansk railway station, his aircraft was hit 122 times, but he and his pilot managed to get their aircraft safely home.
Signatures on item 2
NameInfo




Flight Lieutenant Alex Thom DFC
Born in Perth, Scotland, Alex Thom joined the RAFVR on June 24th 1939 and flew at the weekends at 11 EARFTS Perth. At the outbreak of World War Two, Thom was called up for full time service with the Royal Air Force and was posted to 3 ITW at Hastings on October 2nd 1939, moving to 15 EFTS at Redhill on April 29th 1940 and on June 15th moved again to 15 FTS, initially at Brize Norton and later to Chipping Norton. Alex Thom went to 6 OTU on September 29th at Sutton Bridge where he converted to Hawker Hurricanes and joined 79 squadron stationed at Pembury only for a short period when he was transferred to 87 Squadron on October 6th 1940, moving with the squadron on the 31st of October to their new base at Exeter. He achieved the rank of Pilot Officer on the 3rd of December 1941. During his time at Exeter he was also based on the Scilly Isles and on one occasion after shooting down an enemy bomber the crew bailed out over the sea. Alex Thom circled the downed German crew who were in a life raft until a motor launch came and picked them up. Thom would later meet the crew and was given a flying helmet by the German pilot, an item he still has today. Alex Thom was appointed B Flight commander on 10th July 1942 and was awarded the DFC on the 14th August 1942. At this time he was credited with two enemy aircraft destroyed and a probable He111. On the 19th of August 1942 while supporting the ground forces at Dieppe, his Hurricane (LK - M) was hit by ground fire and lost oil pressure. He managed to limp back to England where he made a forced landing at East Den. Thom managed to get back to his airfield as a passenger in a Master flown by Flt Sgt Lowe and immediately took off again in Hurricane (LK - A) back to Dieppe where he proceeded to strafe enemy positions. On the 1st of October 1942 he became F/O. In November 1942, 87 Squadron was transferred to North Africa. They were transported by ship to Gibraltar where the squadron flew sorties, and then onto North Africa. Thom was posted away from the squadron to be a flying control officer at Bone. He returned to 87 Squadron which was then based at Tongley and took command on June 27th 1943. He was again posted away from the squadron on September 27th returning to the UK with the Rank of Flight Lt. Thom became an instructor with 55 OTU at Annan on November 17th moving to Kirton in Linsay on March 12th 1944 to join 53 OTU. He was appointed Flight Commander Fighter Affiliation Flight at 84 (Bomber) OTU at Husbands Bosworth on May 19th 1944 and remained there until October 10th when he went to RAF Peterhead as Adjutant. His final posting was to HQ13 Group, Inverness on May 8th 1945 as a Staff Officer and retired from the RAF on December 4th 1945 as a Flight Lt.




Group Captain Byron Duckenfield AFC (deceased)
Byron Duckenfield started at Flying Training School on 25th November 1935 in a Blackburn B2 at Brough. As a Sergeant, he joined No.32 Sqn at Biggin Hill on 8th August 1936 and flew Gauntlets and Hurricanes. He joined 74 Squadron at Hornchurch on 11th April 1940, flying Spitfires, and on 5th May was posted to 501 Squadron flying Hurricanes at Tangmere. On the 11th of May at Betheniville, he survived a crash in a passenger transport Bombay aircraft in an aircraft in which he was a passenger, While comin ginto land the aircraft at 200 feet the aircraft stalled and the aircrfat fell backwards just levelly out as it histhe ground. 5 of th epassengers were killed when the centre section collapsed and crushed them. Duckenfield was fortunate as he had moved position during the flight. as the two passengers sitting each side of where he was sitting had died in the crash. (it was found later that the Bombay had beeb loaded with to much weight in the aft sectiion. ) recovering in hospital in Roehampton. On 23rd July 1940, he rejoined No.501 Sqn at Middle Wallop, then moved to to Gravesend two days later, scoring his first victory, a Ju87, on the 29th of July 1940. During August and September he scored three more victories. After a spell as a test pilot from 14th September 1940, he was posted to command 66 Squadron on 20th December 1941, flying Spitfires. On 26th February 1942 he took command of 615 Squadron flying Hurricanes from Fairwood Common, taking the squadron to the Far East. In late December 1942 he was shot down in Burma and captured by the Japanese. He remained a POW until release in May 1945. After a refresher course at the Flying Training School in November 1949, he took command of No.19 Squadron flying Hornets and Meteors from Chruch Fenton. After a series of staff positions, he retired from the RAF as a Group Captain on 28th May 1969. Duckenfield would write later his details :

Burma

At first light, 12 Hurricanes IIC aircraft of 615 Squadron, myself in the lead, took off from Chittagong for central Burma to attack the Japanese air base at Magwe, 300 miles away on the banks of the River Irrawaddy. Arriving at Yenangyaung, we turned downstream at minimum height for Magwe, 30 miles to the South and jettisoned drop tanks. Just before sighting the enemy base, the squadron climbed to 1200 feet and positioned to attack from up sun. On the ramp at the base, in front of the hangers, were 10 or 12 Nakajima KI - 43 Oscars in a rough line up (not dispersed) perhaps readying for take. These aircraft and the hangars behind them were attacked in a single pass, before withdrawing westward at low level and maximum speed. A few minutes later perhaps 20 miles away form Magwe, I was following the line of a cheung (small creek), height about 250 feet, speed aboput 280 mph, when the aircraft gave a violent shudder, accompanied by a very lound, unusual noise. The cause was instantly apparent: the airscrew has disappeared completely, leaving only the spinning hub. My immediate reaction was to throttle back fully and switch off to stop the violently overspeeding engine. Further action was obvious: I was committed to staying with the aircraft because, with a high initial speed, not enough height to eject could be gained without the help of an airscrew. So I jettisoned the canopy and acknowledged gratefully the fact that I was following a creek; the banks of either side were hillocky ground, hostile to a forced landing aircraft. Flying the course of the creek, I soon found the aircraft to be near the stall (luckily, a lower than normal figure without an airscrew) extended the flaps and touched down wheels-up with minimum impact ( I have done worse landings on a smooth runway!) My luck was holding, if one can talk of luck in such a situation. December is the height of the dry season in that area and the creek had little water, it was shallow and narrow at the point where I came down: shallow enough to support the fusalage and narrow enough to support wing tips. So I released the harness, pushed the IFF Destruct switch, climed out and walked the wing ashore, dryshod. The question may occur -Why did not others in the squadron see their leader go down? - the answer is simple, the usual tatctic of withdrawal from an enemy target was to fly single at high speed and low level on parallel courses until a safe distance from target was attained. Then, the formation would climb to re-assemble. Having left the aircraft, I now faced a formidable escape problem? I was 300 miles from friendly territory: my desired route would be westward but 80% of that 300 miles was covered by steep north-south ridges impenetrably clothed in virgin jungle; these were natural impediments, there was also the enemy to consider. Having thought over my predicament, I decided the best I could do - having heard reports of mean herted plainspeope - was to get as far into the hills as possible and then find a (hopefully sympathetic) village. I suppose I may have covered about 15 miles by nightfall when I came upon this small hill village and walked into the village square. Nobody seemed surprised to see me (I suspect I had been followed for some time) I wa given a quiet welcome, seated at a table in the open and given food. Then exhaustion took over, I fell asleep in the chair and woke later to find myself tied up in it. Next day I was handed over to a Japanese sergeant and escort who took me back to Magwe and, soon after that, 2.5 years captivity in Rangoon jail.

Sadly we have learned that Byron Duckenfield passed away on 19th November 2010.
Artist Details : Ivan Berryman
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Ivan Berryman


Ivan Berryman

Latest info : At the beginning of 2010, Ivan is working on the partner painting to the fantastic large World War One aviation combat painting which was painted in 2009. The World War Two partner painting will be the same massive size of 78 inches by 36 inches. The scene will show the battle above Convoy CW8 in the English Channel on 25th July 1940. Ivan chose this scene because it features several aircraft types and some quite well-known fighter pilots. In the picture are Spitfires, Hurricanes, Bf.109s and Stukas. The Stukas were bombing the convoy and British aircraft of 64 Sqn, 54 Sqn and 111 Sqn were scrambled to defend the ships, but were outnumbered by five to one. Because of the view, Dover itself is not visible in the scene, but the action is taking place above a sunlit sea where the convoy is clearly visible under attack. Over the next few months progress photos of this fantatstic painting will be shown.

Over the last 30 years, Ivan Berryman has become a leading aviation, motor racing and naval artist. In this time, the subjects of his paintings have been wide and varied as he has deliberately strived to include some of the lesser know aircraft, ships and events in his portfolio, which includes aircraft like the Defiant, TSR2, Beaufort, ships including MTBs and corvettes, and around 100 different aircraft of the first world war. In addition to this he has taken new approaches to the classic subjects of his field, including the Dambuster Lancasters, Battle of Britain Spitfires, Bf109s and Hurricanes, HMS Hood, Bismarck and the best known naval ships, as well as some iconic sporting moments. In his own words : Art and aviation have been like a brother and sister to me. We have grown up together, learned together and made our adult lives together. But you do not have to have an appreciation of aircraft to admire the graceful lines of a Spitfire or the functional simplicity of a Focke-Wulf 190. They are themselves a work of art and they cry out to be painted - not as machines of war and destruction, but as objects of beauty, born of necessity and function, yet given a life and iconic classicism beyond their original calling. My interest and love of art and aircraft was gifted to me by my father, a designer and aeronautical engineer of considerable repute. Denis Berryman C.Eng. FRAeS. He gave me his eyes, his passion, his dedication and his unwavering professionalism. I owe him everything. And I miss him terribly. A love of art and of beautiful and interesting things takes you on a journey. You discover new interests, new fascinations, and you want to paint them. You want to paint them in their environment, in their element. Whether it is an aeroplane, a warship, a racing car or a beautiful woman, their gift to an artist is the same: Their lines, their texture and the way that light and shadows give them form. These are the food and oxygen of an artist. Not the paint and the canvas. These are mere tools. The secret is in the passion and the perception...





Ivan with some of his original paintings in the originals gallery at Cranston Fine Arts and in his studio.

More about Ivan Berryman

Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

More about Robert Taylor

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

Lancaster CF-X (LM384) of 625 Squadron.  On the Leipzig raid on the evening of 19th/20th February 1944 approx 47 Lancasters were shot down or failed to return, that is over 300 airmen.  Lancaster CF-X (LM384) was taking part in the bombing raids that were a build up to the D-Day landings of June 1944.  Leipzig was seen as a high value target due to its oil and synthetic fuel production.  The Lancaster took off from Kelstern in Lincolnshire just before midnight.  Unfortunately LM384 did not come back as was the case with many others - the aircraft was lost and crashed just outside the tiny village of Bledeln in Germany.  The Pastor of the village, Herr Duncker, kept a diary throughout the war and has an account of the plane crash and the subsequent burial of the crew.  All of the crew died in the crash except one - bomb aimer George Paterson who was interned in Stalag 357 Kopernikus.  The rest of the crew were given a Christian burial and stayed there until the end of the war, when the war graves commission disinterred the crew and reburied them in the Hannover war cemetery.

Last Long Shadow by Anthony Saunders (AP)
Half Price! - £60.00
 Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted flying Typhoon MN934 whilst commanding 146 Wing, 84 Group operating from Needs Oar Point in 1944, en route to a bombing raid on 20th June with other Typhoons of 257 Sqn in which both ends of a railway tunnel full of German supplies were successfully sealed.

Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
On an RAF airfield in the early evening, a squadron of Lancaster bombers of Bomber Command prepare for another bombing sortie against targets of the German war machine.  A fitting tribute to all Bomber Command aircrew who flew in the Avro Lancatser.

Distant Dispersal by Graeme Lothian. (E)
Half Price! - £70.00
 On 20th October 1943, Wildcat and Avenger aircraft from the Carrier US Core, on patrol north of the Azores, surprised U378, a type VIIC U-boat which had been active in that area. The element of surprise was so complete that the submarines guns remained unmanned throughout the action.
The Element of Surprise by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £35.00

 A pair of Focke Wulf 190A4s of 9./JG2 Richthofen based at Vannes, France during February 1943. The nearest aircraft is that of Staffelkapitan Siegfried Schnell. The badge on the nose is the rooster emblem of III./JG2 and the decoration on Schnells rudder shows 70 of his eventual total of 93 kills.

Looking for Business by Ivan Berryman. (E)
Half Price! - £110.00
 Major Hans-Ekkehard Bob is shown claiming his 5th victory – a Blenheim – 60km west of Rotterdam on 26th June 1940.  Bob went on to serve with JG.54, JG.51, JG.3, EJG2.2 and JV.44, scoring a total of 60 confirmed victories in the course of his Luftwaffe service.  The Blenheim claimed as his 5th victory is likely to have been R3776 of No.110 Squadron, which was the only Blenheim recorded to have been lost participating in Operation Soest on that day - while another returned to base damaged and crash landed.  The three crew of the Blenheim were all missing in action - P/O Cyril Ray Worboys, Sgt Gerald Patterson Gainsford and Sgt Kenneth Cooper.

Ltn. Hans-Ekkehard Bob of JG21 Becomes an Ace by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Half Price! - £40.00
 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941. the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945.

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Half Price! - £90.00
 On the evening of 25th May 1940, Luftwaffe Ace Hans-Ekkehard Bob claimed his third victory, bringing down a French Morane 406 near Cambrai during the Battle of France.

Terminal Morane by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 The elegant but ill-fated jewel in the White Star crown Titanic was a technical marvel of engineering in its day. At 882 ft long, her perfect proportions and magnificent profile were the envy of other shipping companies. her tragic loss on her maiden voyage was a crushing blow to the White Star Line that left the whole world in shock.

RMS Titanic by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2750.00
DHM1449GS.  Tirpitz Passing Through Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman.

Tirpitz Passing Through Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman. The submarine HMS Thunderbolt moves away from the depot ship Montcalm.  Another submarine, HMS Swordfish is alongside for resupply.

HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £20.00
B151.  HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00

On 17th June 1944, 780 miles west of Saipan in Mid Pacific, the Gato class submarine USS Cavalla dives after a lucky sighting of a Japanese Naval Task Force, which included the aircraft carriers Taiho, Shokaku and Zuikaku. The Cavalla then trailed the Japanese, attacking and sinking the Shokaku on the 19th.

A Chance Encounter by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £35.00
In the spring of 1942, USS Washington was the first of Americas fast battleship fleet to participate in combat operations when she was briefly assigned to the Royal Navy. On 28th June 1942, together with HMS Duke of York, HMS Victorious and an accompanying cruiser and destroyer force, she formed part of the distant covering force to convoy PQ17, bound for Russia. In the Pacific later that same year, she became the only modern US battleship to engage an enemy capital ship, sinking the Japanese battlecruiser Kirishima.

Arctic guardian - USS Washington by Anthony Saunders (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
 The largest and fastest of all the ships that took part in the Battle of Jutland, the elegant battle cruiser HMS Tiger was launched in 1913 and is easily recognisable by the unusual position of Q turret just aft of the third funnel, She is shown about  to pass beneath the Forth Bridge as she departs Rosyth for a sea trial

HMS Tiger by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
With her mizzen top already gone and her sails aloft having received severe punishment, Victory breaks through the line behind the French flagship Bucentaure, delivering a shattering broadside into her stern. So severe was this opening fire that the Bucentaure was effectively put out of the rest of the battle, although Admiral Villeneuve himself was to miraculously survive the carnage. Beyong Victory can be seen the French Redoubtable, which is receiving fire from Victorys starboard guns, and the Spanish San Leandro is in the extreme distance. Most of Victorys stunsails have been cut away, but it was her stunsail booms that became entangled with the rigging of the Redoubtable when she put her helm to port and ran onto her. Admiral Nelson fell shortly afterward, having received a fatal wound from a musket ball fired by a French sharpshooter in Redoubtables mizzen fighting top. The Temeraire can be seen approaching the fray to the right.

Trafalgar- The Destruction of The Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £325.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 M3 Lee tanks and troops from General Slims 14th Army clear Japanese resistance form the village of Ywathitgyi in their drive to Mandalay.

Road to Mandalay, Burma, February 1945 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
 Sturmgeschutz IIIg and Paratroops of the 4th Fallschirmjager Division, driving to the front line, pass one of the two giant 28cm K5 (Eisenbaum) railway guns responsible for the shelling the Allied beacheads at Anzio and Nettuno.

Anzio Annie, Italy, 29th January 1944 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £2000.00
 British Crusader MK1 tanks of the 4th County of London Yeomanry Regiment, 22nd Armoured Brigade, charge Axis positions during the opening days of the offensive Bir El Gubi.

Operation Crusader, 18th November 1941 by David Pentland. (Y)
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 Panzer v Ausf. D Panthers of SS Panther Division Das Reich make their debut during the initial stages of the German summer offensive for Kursk. This unit with others of the SS Panzer Korps made the deepest advances into the well-prepared Soviet lines. Complete success however, was to elude them when outrunning their supporting divisions at Prokhorovka they were forced to halt for six days.

Operation Zitadelle by David Pentland. (GS)
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 Panzer IVF2 tanks of 6th Panzer Division, Panzer Armee Hoth, attempt to fight their way through to the beleaguered Sixth Army at Stalingrad, 12th December 1942.  On the 21st the operation was abandoned when the expected breakout from Stalingrad failed to materialise, the relief column was only 25 miles from the city.

Operation Winter Tempest by David Pentland. (GS)
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Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
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 US Marines of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd RCT, 2nd Marine Division, supported by LVTs and tanks, take part in the successful but bloody assault on Betio Island, part of the Tarawa Atoll. Operation Galvanic as it was known became the first step on the island road to Japan itself.

Red Beach Two, Tarawa Atoll, 20th November 1943 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 M2A4 and M3 tanks of A Company, 1st US Marine Tank Battalion. move out from Henderson Field to support the perimeter from Japanese attacks.

Guadalcanal by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £295.00

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