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Featured Artists
One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
Military and aviation arist David Pentland.  His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Military and aviation arist David Pentland. His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
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DHM1841. Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor. <p> As the Allied armies dashed across France after victory in Normandy, they remained reliant on one thing - supplies.  With Cherbourg the only port in use, everything depended on trucks to deliver enough fuel, food and ammunition to keep the momentum going.  But there was a problem.  Too few trucks, and too few drivers.  The invasion was in danger of stalling, and if it did, the Germans might just regain the initiative.  Action was needed, and quickly.  Montgomery argued that all resources be channeled into a single, powerful thrust into Germany, but Eisenhower disagreed.  the Allies would advance on a broad front.  But he did give Montgomery the First Allied Airborne Army to try and capture the major bridges in Holland on the road to the Rhine, ahead of the Allies advance.  For the men of the 101st Airborne, the Screaming Eagles, their task was to seize the bridges at Eindhoven.  The 82nd would do the same at Nijmegan, and the British 1st Airborne would capture the farthest bridge, at Arnhem.  On the ground the British 30th Corps would advance northwards and link up with them, and, if successful, turn the German flank on the Rhine.  On 17th September 1944 the plan was put into action, the 101st quickly securing all of its objectives, and the 82nd capturing one bridge.  The British 1st Airborne fought its way into Arnhem and seized the bridge over the Rhine.  Now all they had to do was hold out until the 30th Corps arrived.  But 30th Corps was making slow progress, and although the men of the 101st and the 82nd held out until relieved, in Arnhem it was too late to save the British 1st Airborne.  Battle-weary, without ammunition or supplies, only a few survivors escaped back across the Rhine.  Of the 10,000 men who had landed, just 2,000 made it out.  If the operation had succeeded the war in Europe might have been over by Christmas 1944.  Instead, hostilities would continue through the bitter winter. <b><p>Signed by : <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=1274>Corporal Herb Jr Suerth</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=1278>Private 1st Class Bill Maynard</a><br>and<br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=1717>Sergant Ed Tipper</a>, <br>. <p>Limited edition of 450 prints <p> Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm)  Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm)
B0478B. Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman. <p> Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.  D-Day had arrived. <b><p>Large Size Limited edition of 10 giclee art prints.  <p> Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)
B0475. Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman. <p> Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord. <b><p>Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.  <p> Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)
B0474. Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman. <p> Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944.  These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron. <b><p>Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p> Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

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  Website Price: £ 390.00  

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Tribute to the 101st and 82nd Airborne Print Pack.

DPK0409. Tribute to the 101st and 82nd Airborne Print Pack.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM1841. Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor.

As the Allied armies dashed across France after victory in Normandy, they remained reliant on one thing - supplies. With Cherbourg the only port in use, everything depended on trucks to deliver enough fuel, food and ammunition to keep the momentum going. But there was a problem. Too few trucks, and too few drivers. The invasion was in danger of stalling, and if it did, the Germans might just regain the initiative. Action was needed, and quickly. Montgomery argued that all resources be channeled into a single, powerful thrust into Germany, but Eisenhower disagreed. the Allies would advance on a broad front. But he did give Montgomery the First Allied Airborne Army to try and capture the major bridges in Holland on the road to the Rhine, ahead of the Allies advance. For the men of the 101st Airborne, the Screaming Eagles, their task was to seize the bridges at Eindhoven. The 82nd would do the same at Nijmegan, and the British 1st Airborne would capture the farthest bridge, at Arnhem. On the ground the British 30th Corps would advance northwards and link up with them, and, if successful, turn the German flank on the Rhine. On 17th September 1944 the plan was put into action, the 101st quickly securing all of its objectives, and the 82nd capturing one bridge. The British 1st Airborne fought its way into Arnhem and seized the bridge over the Rhine. Now all they had to do was hold out until the 30th Corps arrived. But 30th Corps was making slow progress, and although the men of the 101st and the 82nd held out until relieved, in Arnhem it was too late to save the British 1st Airborne. Battle-weary, without ammunition or supplies, only a few survivors escaped back across the Rhine. Of the 10,000 men who had landed, just 2,000 made it out. If the operation had succeeded the war in Europe might have been over by Christmas 1944. Instead, hostilities would continue through the bitter winter.

Signed by :
Corporal Herb Jr Suerth,
Private 1st Class Bill Maynard
and
Sergant Ed Tipper,
.

Limited edition of 450 prints 

Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm) Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

B0478B. Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman.

Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord. D-Day had arrived.

Large Size Limited edition of 10 giclee art prints.

Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

B0475. Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman.

Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.

Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.

Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

B0474. Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman.

Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944. These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Website Price: £ 390.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £630.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £240




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Corporal Herb Jr Suerth
18 year old Herb Suerth enlisted as a volunteer for the Reserve Engineer Corps on 11th November 1942, but after a change of heart in 1944 he was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, beginning parachute school training in August that year. After final combat training in Holland, Herb was trucked into Bastogne in December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge, also fighting in Foy. On 9th January 1945 Herb was wounded by artillery fire and his legs were severely injured but ultimately saved. He was shipped out of England and back to the US on 8th April 1945.


Private 1st Class Bill Maynard
Born in 1923, Bill Maynard enlisted into the 101st Airborne Division in 1942, completing his training with Easy Company at camp in Toccoa, Georgia. Posted to Europe, Bill completed his combat training prior to D-Day, and jumped with the rest of Easy Company into Normandy on D-Day itself. He was wounded in heavy fighting shortly afterwards, receiving the Purple Heart, but continued to fight on. An experienced marksman with pistol, rifle and machine-gun, he fought with Easy Company throughout Normandy, into Holland, at Bastogne, and into southern Germany at the end of the war.


Sergant Ed Tipper

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

FAR936. The Peacekeepers by Adrian Rigby.

The Peacekeepers by Adrian Rigby.
Half Price! - £25.00
 At 3.30am on the 23rd June 1945, a Dakota of 357 (special duties) Squadron took off from Mingaladon airfield nr.  Rangoon , to travel the 600 miles, 300 of them behind enemy lines, to rescue a downed American Liberator crew deep in the jungles of   Siam  .  The Dakota was flown by pilot Fl Lt. Larry Lewis, who already held the DFM awarded to him for 33 ops as a rear gunner on   Wellingtons  in 1941. Two crews had already failed when Lewis was asked to attempt this hazardous mission. Flying between 5,000 - 6,000ft he flew over The Hump, a ridge of mountains running down the spine of   Burma  . Local villagers had cleared a rough airstrip 800yds long with Lewis finding it by the time dawn broke. With monsoon clouds gathering, the Liberator crew aboard and the Dakota sinking in the wet ground, he managed, just, to get airborne. Flying at zero feet and looking out for Japanese Zero fighters Lewis took a different course back. Although being fired on from the ground they managed to make it all the way to the airfield at Dum Dum nr.   Calcutta ,  India  . Lewis was awarded an immediate DFC. By the end of the war he had completed 63 ops, held the rank of Squadron Leader with his service from 1938-1945, and was awarded the Air Efficiency Medal.

Larry Lewis DFC by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00
 Dedicated to those who served and died in the Battle of Britain on the ground and in the air during the summer of 1940.

A Nation Alone by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.

Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00

 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 Hurricanes of 607 County of Durham Squadron diving down and attacking Heinkels over the Needles on the Isle of Wight, after a raid on the southern coast. 607 squadron were stationed at nearby Tangmere from the start of September 1940 and saw continuous action throughout the Battle of Britain until the 16th October, when it withdrew to Scotland having raised its total victory to 102. Also aiding in the pursuit are Spitfires of 602 City of Glasgow Squadron based at Westhampnett.

Hurricanes Over the Needles by Graeme Lothian. (Y)
Half Price! - £310.00
 Depicting a crashed Beau Nightfighter.

Desert Prang by Geoff Lea. (P)
Half Price! - £1300.00
 With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background. The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42 ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.
Faith Hope and Charity by Stan Stokes. (C)
Half Price! - £65.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 The Last of the heavy Cruisers built by Germany (5 in total) The picture shows Admiral Hipper making her first sortie on the 18th February 1940, accompanied by the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau on Operation Nordmark. (Search for allied convoys on the route between Britain and Norway)

The Narvik Squadron by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 HMS Benbow was completed in 1914, built by Beardmore (launched 12th November 1913). On the 10th of December she joined the Grand Fleet serving with the 4th Battle squadron. She was the flagship to Admiral Douglas Gamble until he was replaced in February 1915 by Sir Doveton Sturdee. During  the Battle of Jutland. she suffered no damage. After the war she served from 1919 in the Mediterranean providing Gun fire support to the white Russians in the Black Sea until 1920. She remained in the Mediterranean until 1926 joining the Atlantic fleet for the next three years until 1929 when she was paid off and scrapped in March 1931.

HMS Benbow at the Battle of Jutland by Anthony Saunders. 
Half Price! - £85.00
 Known as the Silent Service, the men of the United States Submarine Force were the unsung heroes of the US Navy.  In World War Two, Submarine Force alone was responsible for sinking over fifty percent of Japanese Shipping - but the success came at a high price - one in five submarines did not survive the war.  Here USS Wahoo, arguably the most famous US Submarine of the war, is seen surveying a kill during her fifth war patrol in 1943.  USS Wahoo (SS-238)  would also fall victim, sunk by Japanese aircraft and Japanese submarine chasers 15 and 43 in Soya Strait, Japan on the 11th of October 1943.

Night of the Hunter, USS Wahoo by Anthony Saunders. (P)
Half Price! - £2600.00
 HMS Intrepid embarks some of her landing craft during the Falklands conflict of 1982.
HMS Intrepid by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00

Two F14 Tomcats of VF-1 pass in close formation over the stern of the veteran USS Ranger (CV-61)

USS Ranger by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £295.00
 The mighty Tirpitz demonstrates the effectiveness of her splinter camouflage, surrounded by her net defences at Kaafjord in the Winter of 1943-44.

Tirpitz in Kaafjord by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
 The Dido class cruiser HMS Naiad is pictured together with the cruiser HMS Leander during the encounter with the French Guepard in 1941 whilst they were both engaged in operations against the Vichy-French forces in Syria.

HMS Naiad by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £500.00
 The cruiser HMS Frobisher dominates this scene off Houlgate at the Normandy landings of 1944.  The monitor HMS Roberts lies beyond Frobisher with a Large Infantry Landing Ship or LSI (L) unshipping its LCAs on the extreme right of the picture.  In the foreground, a motor launch attends a group of LCP (L)s as they head for the French beaches.  Two Spitfire Mk.IXs conduct sweeps overhead as Operation Neptune gathers momentum.

HMS Frobisher and HMS Roberts at Normandy by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £75.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Panzer IVF2 tanks of 6th Panzer Division, Panzer Armee Hoth, attempt to fight their way through to the beleaguered Sixth Army at Stalingrad, 12th December 1942.  On the 21st the operation was abandoned when the expected breakout from Stalingrad failed to materialise, the relief column was only 25 miles from the city.

Operation Winter Tempest by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
 Captain R. Blair Paddy Mayne, and men of L detachment SAS, stop to discuss their location en route to Sidi Haneish airfield. The raid was a major victory, especially for the newly acquired jeeps, which played an important part in the destruction of some 40 enemy aircraft for the loss of one man.

Paddys Troopers, The Sidi Haneish Road, 17th July 1942 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
 Falaise, 12th – 21st August 1944.  British 5.5 inch guns of the Royal Artillery in action during the final Normandy battles to close the Falaise Pocket.

Heavy Artillery by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

 Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank. Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right) Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Replacements from 1st Battalion Irish Guards and Sherman tanks of the 46th Royal Tank Regiment move through the debris of Anzio town towards their jump-off positions for the Battle of Campoleone Station.

Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe.  No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
 Ernst Barkmanns (Das Reich, 2nd SS Panzer Division) famous day long solo engagement against an American Armoured breakthrough towards St. Lo, Normandy, 26th July 1944.

Barkmanns Corner by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £100.00

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