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Featured Artists
Military and aviation arist David Pentland.  His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
David Pentland
Ivan Berryman


One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
Robert Taylor
Nicolas Trudgian

 
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DHM1841. Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor. <p> As the Allied armies dashed across France after victory in Normandy, they remained reliant on one thing - supplies.  With Cherbourg the only port in use, everything depended on trucks to deliver enough fuel, food and ammunition to keep the momentum going.  But there was a problem.  Too few trucks, and too few drivers.  The invasion was in danger of stalling, and if it did, the Germans might just regain the initiative.  Action was needed, and quickly.  Montgomery argued that all resources be channeled into a single, powerful thrust into Germany, but Eisenhower disagreed.  the Allies would advance on a broad front.  But he did give Montgomery the First Allied Airborne Army to try and capture the major bridges in Holland on the road to the Rhine, ahead of the Allies advance.  For the men of the 101st Airborne, the Screaming Eagles, their task was to seize the bridges at Eindhoven.  The 82nd would do the same at Nijmegan, and the British 1st Airborne would capture the farthest bridge, at Arnhem.  On the ground the British 30th Corps would advance northwards and link up with them, and, if successful, turn the German flank on the Rhine.  On 17th September 1944 the plan was put into action, the 101st quickly securing all of its objectives, and the 82nd capturing one bridge.  The British 1st Airborne fought its way into Arnhem and seized the bridge over the Rhine.  Now all they had to do was hold out until the 30th Corps arrived.  But 30th Corps was making slow progress, and although the men of the 101st and the 82nd held out until relieved, in Arnhem it was too late to save the British 1st Airborne.  Battle-weary, without ammunition or supplies, only a few survivors escaped back across the Rhine.  Of the 10,000 men who had landed, just 2,000 made it out.  If the operation had succeeded the war in Europe might have been over by Christmas 1944.  Instead, hostilities would continue through the bitter winter. <b><p>Signed by : <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=1274>Corporal Herb Jr Suerth</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=1278>Private 1st Class Bill Maynard</a><br>and<br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=1717>Sergant Ed Tipper</a>, <br>. <p>Limited edition of 450 prints <p> Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm)  Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm)
B0478B. Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman. <p> Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.  D-Day had arrived. <b><p>Large Size Limited edition of 10 giclee art prints.  <p> Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)
B0475. Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman. <p> Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord. <b><p>Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.  <p> Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)
B0474. Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman. <p> Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944.  These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron. <b><p>Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p> Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

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  Website Price: £ 390.00  

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Tribute to the 101st and 82nd Airborne Print Pack.

DPK0409. Tribute to the 101st and 82nd Airborne Print Pack.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM1841. Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor.

As the Allied armies dashed across France after victory in Normandy, they remained reliant on one thing - supplies. With Cherbourg the only port in use, everything depended on trucks to deliver enough fuel, food and ammunition to keep the momentum going. But there was a problem. Too few trucks, and too few drivers. The invasion was in danger of stalling, and if it did, the Germans might just regain the initiative. Action was needed, and quickly. Montgomery argued that all resources be channeled into a single, powerful thrust into Germany, but Eisenhower disagreed. the Allies would advance on a broad front. But he did give Montgomery the First Allied Airborne Army to try and capture the major bridges in Holland on the road to the Rhine, ahead of the Allies advance. For the men of the 101st Airborne, the Screaming Eagles, their task was to seize the bridges at Eindhoven. The 82nd would do the same at Nijmegan, and the British 1st Airborne would capture the farthest bridge, at Arnhem. On the ground the British 30th Corps would advance northwards and link up with them, and, if successful, turn the German flank on the Rhine. On 17th September 1944 the plan was put into action, the 101st quickly securing all of its objectives, and the 82nd capturing one bridge. The British 1st Airborne fought its way into Arnhem and seized the bridge over the Rhine. Now all they had to do was hold out until the 30th Corps arrived. But 30th Corps was making slow progress, and although the men of the 101st and the 82nd held out until relieved, in Arnhem it was too late to save the British 1st Airborne. Battle-weary, without ammunition or supplies, only a few survivors escaped back across the Rhine. Of the 10,000 men who had landed, just 2,000 made it out. If the operation had succeeded the war in Europe might have been over by Christmas 1944. Instead, hostilities would continue through the bitter winter.

Signed by :
Corporal Herb Jr Suerth,
Private 1st Class Bill Maynard
and
Sergant Ed Tipper,
.

Limited edition of 450 prints 

Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm) Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

B0478B. Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman.

Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord. D-Day had arrived.

Large Size Limited edition of 10 giclee art prints.

Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

B0475. Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman.

Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.

Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.

Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

B0474. Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman.

Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944. These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Website Price: £ 390.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £630.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £240




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Corporal Herb Jr Suerth
18 year old Herb Suerth enlisted as a volunteer for the Reserve Engineer Corps on 11th November 1942, but after a change of heart in 1944 he was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, beginning parachute school training in August that year. After final combat training in Holland, Herb was trucked into Bastogne in December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge, also fighting in Foy. On 9th January 1945 Herb was wounded by artillery fire and his legs were severely injured but ultimately saved. He was shipped out of England and back to the US on 8th April 1945.


Private 1st Class Bill Maynard
Born in 1923, Bill Maynard enlisted into the 101st Airborne Division in 1942, completing his training with Easy Company at camp in Toccoa, Georgia. Posted to Europe, Bill completed his combat training prior to D-Day, and jumped with the rest of Easy Company into Normandy on D-Day itself. He was wounded in heavy fighting shortly afterwards, receiving the Purple Heart, but continued to fight on. An experienced marksman with pistol, rifle and machine-gun, he fought with Easy Company throughout Normandy, into Holland, at Bastogne, and into southern Germany at the end of the war.


Sergant Ed Tipper
When I came out of the Army I walked with a cane and wore an eye patch. The thing I remember most was the tremendous response of everybody I met to do everything they could do to show support for the military. Maybe the support felt exaggerated to me because I had clearly been shot up and wounded. Whenever I ate at a restaurant I went to the cashier and there was almost never a bill. Or the waitress nodded her head and said, A gentleman over at that table has paid. Of course I was home a year ahead of everybody else. But that sort of thing happened to me a lot.

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 High above the trenches in April 1918, 74 Squadron engage the famed JG 1 led by the renowned ace baron von Richthofen in his distinctive bright red DR 1. Edward Mick mannock flying a SE5.a diving down top engage another Fokker Dr1 as the red baron flies past momentarily catching each others eyes. The new CO of 74 squadron, major Grid Caldwell MC (bar) New Zealands top ace can be seen above entering the dog fight. But it would be Mannock who would go on to great fame. with 61 confirmed victories and to win the VC, DSO (bar) and MC (bar) After 74 squadron he replaced Billy Bishop of CO 85 Squadron on the 3rd July 1918, scoring 46 victories in the Se5.a He was killed by ground fire near Lestram, France on the 26th July 1918. his Victoria Cross being gazetted on the 18th July 1919. The red baron CO of the Richthofens Flying circus didnt survive the month, also killed by ground fire on the 24th April, he was buried by the Allies with full military honours.

Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Routine, though essential, maintenance is carried out on a 501 Sqn Hurricane at the height of the Battle of Britain during the Summer of 1940.  Hurricane P3059 <i>SD-N</i> in the background is the aircraft of Group Captain Byron Duckenfield.

Ground Force by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £42.50
 The Vulcan B2 of 50 Squadron heads to Ascension Island from its base at Waddington, where it had been completely overhauled, including the fitting of a refuelling probe, which had to be found from various stores at Catterick, Goosebay in Labrador, Canada, and Wright-Patterson Airfield in Ohio, USA. The Vulcan would take part in the seven planned bombing missions during the Falklands campaign codenamed Operation Black Buck. Each mission would require a solo Vulcan Bomber (plus an airborne reserve Vulcan in case of problems with the first) to fly and bomb the Argentinean airfield at Port Stanley, requiring the support of 12 Handley Page Victor K2 tankers of 55 and 57 squadron on the outward journey and 2 Victors and a Nimrod on the return journey.

Vulcan B.2, 50 Sqn, Waddington by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Half Price! - £60.00
 At the end of its landing run and streaming the unmistakable scarlet brake parachute with its characteristic tuck at the bottom, an SR-71 prepares to turn off of the runway after another Hot Flight.   Retired in favour of other technology including satellite surveillance a small number of these remarkable aircraft were due to start back in service at the end of 1996.  There were jobs that just could not be done by any other system, even the most sophisticated modern technology failing to address all of the incredible capabilities of one of the most advanced aircraft of all time.

The Black is Back by Robert Tomlin.
Half Price! - £45.00
Two F14 Tomcats of VF-1 pass in close formation over the stern of the veteran USS Ranger (CV-61)

USS Ranger by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £295.00
 If you had the height, you controlled the battle. If you came out of the sun, the enemy could not see you. If you held your fire until you were very close, you seldom missed. These three basic rules contributed to the prowess in aerial combat of some of the most successful fighter pilots in history and seldom were they more valuable than when outnumbered. Between July and October 1940 the brave young pilots of RAF Fighter Command were under intense pressure from the constant attacks of the Luftwaffe and the Hawker Hurricane was <i>the</i> machine of the Battle of Britain, accounting for 80 percent of Allied victories.  In this painting, Hurricanes of 32 Sqn climb high into the morning sky, gaining Height and Sun in an attempt to take the advantage over the onslaught of enemy fighters - August, 1940.  This image captures the surreal calmness above the clouds, belying the fury of action and ultimate sacrifices made in those crisp blue skies.

Height and Sun by Robert Taylor.
Half Price! - £150.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

VAR347B. H.M.A.S. Wyhalla 1943 by Brian Wood.
H.M.A.S. Wyhalla 1943 by Brian Wood (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Built in Barrow-in-Furness and the 7th and last of the Trafalgar class of British submarines, HMS Triumph is one of the most modern and potent vessels of her kind.  Selected in March 2011 to take part in the coalition suppression of Colonel Gadaffi's attacks against his own people, HMS Triumph fired a number of TLAMs (Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles) aimed at air defence targets on the Libyan mainland at the outset of coalition operations, helping to reduce the threat of air attacks by the Libyan Air Force.

HMS Triumph by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 U-35 under the command of Kapitänleutnant Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière, the all time most successful u-boat captain sinking 194 ships, many of which were sunk by the u-boats 88mm deck gun.

Kapitänleutnant Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière, U-35 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £550.00
 Arguably the most iconic moment in British naval history, <i>HMS Victory</i> is depicted just moments from firing her devastating opening salvo into the stern galleries of the French flagship </i>Bucentaure</i> at Trafalgar as Nelson's flagship enters the fray at approximately 12.30pm on October 21st 1805.  Beyond <i>Victory</i>, in the extreme distance through the gun smoke, Collingwood's <i>Royal Sovereign</i>is engaging the <i>Santa Ana</i>.  To the left of the painting, the French <i>Neptune</i> and Spanish <i>San Justo</i> can be seen with <i>Redoutable</i> immediately beyond <i>Victory</i>, trying vainly to close the gap.  <i>Victory</i>, already shot to pieces, is about to wreak her terrible revenge on the <i>Bucentaure</i> in the foreground where Vice-Admiral Villeneuve can be seen on the poop deck - wearing the green corduroy pantaloons.  Nelson was surely the nemesis of Villeneuve, who had been summarily humiliated some seven years earlier at the Battle of the Nile and Nelson's tactics would again win the day for His Majesty's navy, albeit at the tragic cost of Nelson himself.

Nemesis by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £6500.00

At 12.30pm on the 21st of October 1805, Admiral Lord Nelson on board his flagship, HMS Victory, breaks the line of the combined French and Spanish fleets.  The Victory is delivering a devastating stern rake to the 80 gun French ship Bucentaure, the flagship of the combined fleets, commanded by Vice-Admiral P. C. J. B. S. Villeneuve.  Starboard to the Victory is the 74 gun Redoutable.  This ship, the Victory and HMS Temeraire, seen left, became locked together soon after, the unequal exchange resulting in the Redoutable having the highest casualties during the entire battle.

Breaking the Line at the Battle of Trafalgar by Graeme Lothian
Half Price! - £50.00
 On 20th October 1943, Wildcat and Avenger aircraft from the Carrier US Core, on patrol north of the Azores, surprised U378, a type VIIC U-boat which had been active in that area. The element of surprise was so complete that the submarines guns remained unmanned throughout the action.
The Element of Surprise by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £35.00
B151P. HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £450.00
 Late October 1942 in the waters east of Guadalcanal, the Battle of Santa Cruz saw the sinking of the US carrier Hornet, in what proved to be the last major carrier battle of the South Pacific theatre.

USS Hornet, Eye of the Storm by Anthony Saunders
Half Price! - £40.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Cheux, Normandy, 25th June 1944.  Royal Armoured Corps Recce troops of the 15th (Scottish) Infantry Division set up a temporary observation post to locate 12th SS Panzer Division positions, prior to Operation Epsom.  The 15th Division comprised of 9th Cameronians, 2nd Glasgow Highlanders, 7th Seaforth Highlanders, 8th Royal Scots, 6th Royal Scots Fusiliers, 6th King's Own Scottish Borderers, 10th Highland Light Infantry, 2nd Gordon Highlanders and the 2nd Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Enemy in Sight by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Replacements from 1st Battalion Irish Guards and Sherman tanks of the 46th Royal Tank Regiment move through the debris of Anzio town towards their jump-off positions for the Battle of Campoleone Station.

Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £2000.00
 Kharkov, Russia, February - March 1943.  After abandoning Rostov and Kharkov in the face of the Soviet Winter Offensive, Field Marshal Erich von Manstein set about the recapture of both.  Among those taking part in the ensuing counterattack was the newly promoted tank gunner Erich Barkmann, of 2nd Company 2nd SS Panzer Grenadier Division, who had just been given command of his own Panzer III.

The Long Road to Kharkov by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 OT34 Flamethrower tank and men of Col. Krickmans 6th Guards Tank Brigade take part in the Soviet counter attacks of 13th-27th September in defence of the southern factory district of Stalingrad before the final offensive in October.

Motherland, The Battle of Stalingrad, September 1942 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £95.00

 Braving intense enemy fire, Lt. Col. RB Mayne, Commanding Officer 1st SAS Regiment devastated a German ambush and subsequently rescued wounded troops of his own unit who had been pinned down while on a reconnaissance mission for the 4th Canadian Armoured Division.

Paddys Fourth DSO, The Olderburg Raid, 9th April 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 German forces encircled in the fortress town of Konigsberg by 3rd Ukranian front prepare to break through the besieging Soviet lines to re-establish a supply line to the Baltic. Here some Stug III assault guns move up to their assembly area next to the towns World War One memorial. From here the attack was launched on February 18th 1945 and successfully opened a supply corridor which remained in place until 8th April.

Counter Attack at Konigsberg by David Pentland. (B)
Half Price! - £60.00
 A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Müncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th april 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
CC017. Original art for the poster of the film The Big Red One starring Lee Marvin by Chris Collingwood.

Original art for the poster of the film The Big Red One starring Lee Marvin by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £2000.00

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