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DHM1841. Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor. <p> As the Allied armies dashed across France after victory in Normandy, they remained reliant on one thing - supplies.  With Cherbourg the only port in use, everything depended on trucks to deliver enough fuel, food and ammunition to keep the momentum going.  But there was a problem.  Too few trucks, and too few drivers.  The invasion was in danger of stalling, and if it did, the Germans might just regain the initiative.  Action was needed, and quickly.  Montgomery argued that all resources be channeled into a single, powerful thrust into Germany, but Eisenhower disagreed.  the Allies would advance on a broad front.  But he did give Montgomery the First Allied Airborne Army to try and capture the major bridges in Holland on the road to the Rhine, ahead of the Allies advance.  For the men of the 101st Airborne, the Screaming Eagles, their task was to seize the bridges at Eindhoven.  The 82nd would do the same at Nijmegan, and the British 1st Airborne would capture the farthest bridge, at Arnhem.  On the ground the British 30th Corps would advance northwards and link up with them, and, if successful, turn the German flank on the Rhine.  On 17th September 1944 the plan was put into action, the 101st quickly securing all of its objectives, and the 82nd capturing one bridge.  The British 1st Airborne fought its way into Arnhem and seized the bridge over the Rhine.  Now all they had to do was hold out until the 30th Corps arrived.  But 30th Corps was making slow progress, and although the men of the 101st and the 82nd held out until relieved, in Arnhem it was too late to save the British 1st Airborne.  Battle-weary, without ammunition or supplies, only a few survivors escaped back across the Rhine.  Of the 10,000 men who had landed, just 2,000 made it out.  If the operation had succeeded the war in Europe might have been over by Christmas 1944.  Instead, hostilities would continue through the bitter winter. <b><p>Signed by : <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=1274>Corporal Herb Jr Suerth</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=1278>Private 1st Class Bill Maynard</a><br>and<br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=1717>Sergant Ed Tipper</a>, <br>. <p>Limited edition of 450 prints.<p> Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm)  Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm)
B0478B. Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman. <p> Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.  D-Day had arrived. <b><p>Large Size Limited edition of 10 giclee art prints.  <p> Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)
B0475. Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman. <p> Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord. <b><p>Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.  <p> Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)
B0474. Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman. <p> Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944.  These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron. <b><p>Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p> Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

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Tribute to the 101st and 82nd Airborne Print Pack.

DPK0409. Tribute to the 101st and 82nd Airborne Print Pack.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM1841. Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor.

As the Allied armies dashed across France after victory in Normandy, they remained reliant on one thing - supplies. With Cherbourg the only port in use, everything depended on trucks to deliver enough fuel, food and ammunition to keep the momentum going. But there was a problem. Too few trucks, and too few drivers. The invasion was in danger of stalling, and if it did, the Germans might just regain the initiative. Action was needed, and quickly. Montgomery argued that all resources be channeled into a single, powerful thrust into Germany, but Eisenhower disagreed. the Allies would advance on a broad front. But he did give Montgomery the First Allied Airborne Army to try and capture the major bridges in Holland on the road to the Rhine, ahead of the Allies advance. For the men of the 101st Airborne, the Screaming Eagles, their task was to seize the bridges at Eindhoven. The 82nd would do the same at Nijmegan, and the British 1st Airborne would capture the farthest bridge, at Arnhem. On the ground the British 30th Corps would advance northwards and link up with them, and, if successful, turn the German flank on the Rhine. On 17th September 1944 the plan was put into action, the 101st quickly securing all of its objectives, and the 82nd capturing one bridge. The British 1st Airborne fought its way into Arnhem and seized the bridge over the Rhine. Now all they had to do was hold out until the 30th Corps arrived. But 30th Corps was making slow progress, and although the men of the 101st and the 82nd held out until relieved, in Arnhem it was too late to save the British 1st Airborne. Battle-weary, without ammunition or supplies, only a few survivors escaped back across the Rhine. Of the 10,000 men who had landed, just 2,000 made it out. If the operation had succeeded the war in Europe might have been over by Christmas 1944. Instead, hostilities would continue through the bitter winter.

Signed by :
Corporal Herb Jr Suerth,
Private 1st Class Bill Maynard
and
Sergant Ed Tipper,
.

Limited edition of 450 prints.

Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm) Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

B0478B. Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman.

Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord. D-Day had arrived.

Large Size Limited edition of 10 giclee art prints.

Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

B0475. Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman.

Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.

Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.

Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

B0474. Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman.

Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944. These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Website Price: 390.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost 625.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save 235




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Corporal Herb Jr Suerth
18 year old Herb Suerth enlisted as a volunteer for the Reserve Engineer Corps on 11th November 1942, but after a change of heart in 1944 he was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, beginning parachute school training in August that year. After final combat training in Holland, Herb was trucked into Bastogne in December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge, also fighting in Foy. On 9th January 1945 Herb was wounded by artillery fire and his legs were severely injured but ultimately saved. He was shipped out of England and back to the US on 8th April 1945.


Private 1st Class Bill Maynard
Born in 1923, Bill Maynard enlisted into the 101st Airborne Division in 1942, completing his training with Easy Company at camp in Toccoa, Georgia. Posted to Europe, Bill completed his combat training prior to D-Day, and jumped with the rest of Easy Company into Normandy on D-Day itself. He was wounded in heavy fighting shortly afterwards, receiving the Purple Heart, but continued to fight on. An experienced marksman with pistol, rifle and machine-gun, he fought with Easy Company throughout Normandy, into Holland, at Bastogne, and into southern Germany at the end of the war.


Sergant Ed Tipper
When I came out of the Army I walked with a cane and wore an eye patch. The thing I remember most was the tremendous response of everybody I met to do everything they could do to show support for the military. Maybe the support felt exaggerated to me because I had clearly been shot up and wounded. Whenever I ate at a restaurant I went to the cashier and there was almost never a bill. Or the waitress nodded her head and said, A gentleman over at that table has paid. Of course I was home a year ahead of everybody else. But that sort of thing happened to me a lot.

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