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DHM2605B. Top Dog by Robert Taylor. <p> Completing a record 213 operational sorties with Bomber Commands Pathfinder Force, Mosquito LR503 became one of the most successful aircraft in the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew first with 109 Pathfinder Squadron, and then 105 Pathfinder Squadron, completing more combat missions than any other Allied aircraft. <b><p> Signatories: <a href=profiles.php?SigID=429>Wng Com Robert Bray DFC</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=27>Sqn Ldr T J Broom DFC (deceased)</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=430>Sqn Ldr Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased)</a>, <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=431>Flt Lt Ray Harington</a><br>and <br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=814>Warrant Officer A E Winwood (deceased)</a>. <p> RAF limited edition of 500 prints, with 5 signatures. <p> Print paper size 22 inches x 21 inches (56cm x 53cm)
DHM1910. A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman. <p> A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943.  Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties. <b><p>Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=785>Flying Officer Harold Corbin CGM</a><br>and<br><a href=profiles.php?SigID=707>Flying Officer Maurice Webb DFM</a>. <p>Signed limited edition of 950 prints.  <p>Image size 17 inches x 11 inches (43cm x 28cm)
STK0138. Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes. <p> Although fifty years has passed since the end of WW II, the de Havilland Mosquito, or Mossie, is still held in high admiration by the crews which flew this wonderful aircraft. Built in a number of variants, the Mosquito served in a number of roles including fighter, bomber, trainer, transport, night fighter, and reconnaissance aircraft. Prior to WW II the de Havilland Company had built a good reputation for building highly streamlined, very fast aircraft, utilized for racing. The Company submitted a design proposal in 1939 for an all new twin-engined aircraft, primarily built of wood, which would be capable of 400 MPH with its twin Merlin engines. Late in 1939 the Air Ministry ordered a prototype, and in March of 1940 an initial fifty production aircraft were ordered. The Mosquito was built utilizing a one-piece, two-spar wing. Spruce and plywood were utilized extensively. The aircraft performed admirably in its initial tests and the first combat mission took place in September, 1941. Some of the early Mosquitoes were produced in a bomber variant. Early Mosquitoes were painted in a unique blue-gray camouflage. One of the first squadrons equipped with the Mosquito was number 105. In September of 1942, 105 squadron sent four of its aircraft on a daring daylight low level raid to bomb the Gestapo Headquarters in Oslo, Norway. This successful mission was lead by RAF Squadron Leader George Parry. The mission was important because the Gestapo Headquarters housed vital dossiers on Norwegian resistance personnel, and the resistance had requested the mission to boost morale. The Mosquitoes were unexpectedly attacked by two Fw-190s as they approached the target. One of the aircraft (piloted by F/Sgt. Carter) was hit and crashed while attempting a forced landing on a lake. One of the Fw-190s struck a tree during the chase, and crash landed in a mountainous area.  Stan Stokes, in his striking painting, appropriately titled Those Nagging Mosquitoes, depicts the three returning aircraft of 105 Squadron flying fast and low over a fjord in Norway. Because the Mossie utilized speed as a way to avoid enemy fighters, several minor modifications were made to coax every additional MPH possible out of the aircraft. Other modification were made to some aircraft which allowed them to carry a 4,000 pound bomb. The Mosquito was also produced under license in Canada utilizing Packard-manufactured Merlin engines. The Mosquito B Mk IX utilized a pair of 1,680 HP Merlin 72s and the prototype attained a speed of 437 MPH. Other Mossies were modified to utilize a bulbous ventral radar dome. The Mosquito was produced until 1950. More than 7,700 aircraft were built. The aircraft remained in service with the RAF until 1963. Only a few restored examples of this versatile aircraft remain in existence. <b><p> Signed limited edition of 4750 prints.  <p> Print size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm)  Supplied with signed and numbered certificate of authenticity.

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Pilot Signed Mosquito Aircraft Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.

PCK2619. Pilot Signed Mosquito Aircraft Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2605B. Top Dog by Robert Taylor.

Completing a record 213 operational sorties with Bomber Commands Pathfinder Force, Mosquito LR503 became one of the most successful aircraft in the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew first with 109 Pathfinder Squadron, and then 105 Pathfinder Squadron, completing more combat missions than any other Allied aircraft.

Signatories: Wng Com Robert Bray DFC,
Sqn Ldr T J Broom DFC (deceased),
Sqn Ldr Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased),
Flt Lt Ray Harington
and
Warrant Officer A E Winwood (deceased).

RAF limited edition of 500 prints, with 5 signatures.

Print paper size 22 inches x 21 inches (56cm x 53cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1910. A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman.

A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943. Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties.

Signed by Flying Officer Harold Corbin CGM
and
Flying Officer Maurice Webb DFM.

Signed limited edition of 950 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 11 inches (43cm x 28cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

STK0138. Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes.

Although fifty years has passed since the end of WW II, the de Havilland Mosquito, or Mossie, is still held in high admiration by the crews which flew this wonderful aircraft. Built in a number of variants, the Mosquito served in a number of roles including fighter, bomber, trainer, transport, night fighter, and reconnaissance aircraft. Prior to WW II the de Havilland Company had built a good reputation for building highly streamlined, very fast aircraft, utilized for racing. The Company submitted a design proposal in 1939 for an all new twin-engined aircraft, primarily built of wood, which would be capable of 400 MPH with its twin Merlin engines. Late in 1939 the Air Ministry ordered a prototype, and in March of 1940 an initial fifty production aircraft were ordered. The Mosquito was built utilizing a one-piece, two-spar wing. Spruce and plywood were utilized extensively. The aircraft performed admirably in its initial tests and the first combat mission took place in September, 1941. Some of the early Mosquitoes were produced in a bomber variant. Early Mosquitoes were painted in a unique blue-gray camouflage. One of the first squadrons equipped with the Mosquito was number 105. In September of 1942, 105 squadron sent four of its aircraft on a daring daylight low level raid to bomb the Gestapo Headquarters in Oslo, Norway. This successful mission was lead by RAF Squadron Leader George Parry. The mission was important because the Gestapo Headquarters housed vital dossiers on Norwegian resistance personnel, and the resistance had requested the mission to boost morale. The Mosquitoes were unexpectedly attacked by two Fw-190s as they approached the target. One of the aircraft (piloted by F/Sgt. Carter) was hit and crashed while attempting a forced landing on a lake. One of the Fw-190s struck a tree during the chase, and crash landed in a mountainous area. Stan Stokes, in his striking painting, appropriately titled Those Nagging Mosquitoes, depicts the three returning aircraft of 105 Squadron flying fast and low over a fjord in Norway. Because the Mossie utilized speed as a way to avoid enemy fighters, several minor modifications were made to coax every additional MPH possible out of the aircraft. Other modification were made to some aircraft which allowed them to carry a 4,000 pound bomb. The Mosquito was also produced under license in Canada utilizing Packard-manufactured Merlin engines. The Mosquito B Mk IX utilized a pair of 1,680 HP Merlin 72s and the prototype attained a speed of 437 MPH. Other Mossies were modified to utilize a bulbous ventral radar dome. The Mosquito was produced until 1950. More than 7,700 aircraft were built. The aircraft remained in service with the RAF until 1963. Only a few restored examples of this versatile aircraft remain in existence.

Signed limited edition of 4750 prints.

Print size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm) Supplied with signed and numbered certificate of authenticity.


Website Price: £ 180.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £347.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £167




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Flight Lieutenant Ray Harington
Ray joined the RAF in 1941, completing his training in South Africa. In January 1944 he was posted to 603 Squadron flying Beaufighters in North Africa. Here he teamed up with navigator, Warrant Officer A.E. ‘Bert’ Winwood, and from where they launched attacks across the Mediterranean into Crete, Greece and the Aegean Islands against shipping, harbour installations and enemy aircraft with much success. In December 1944 they were posted to 235 Squadron Coastal Command, part of the Banff Strike Wing, converting to Mosquitos. In April 1945 they were shot down following a strike in the Kattegat, but avoided capture and with the help of the Danish resistance made it home, where they continued to fly again from Banff.
Squadron Leader Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased)Qualifying as an Observer in 1941, Ron joined 144 Squadron on Hamden’s before transferring to 44 Squadron at Waddington as a Navigator on Lancaster’s. At the end of the 1942 he moved to Marham, converting to Mosquitos, and in 1943 was posted to 109 Squadron equipped with Oboe as part of the Pathfinder Force. He flew 104 Oboe operations and 139 ops in total, and was widely credited with helping advance development of the Oboe system.


The signature of Squadron Leader TJ Tommy Broom DFC (deceased)

Squadron Leader TJ Tommy Broom DFC (deceased)
Thomas John Broom was born on January 22 1914 at Portishead, Bristol, and educated at Slade Road School, leaving when he was 14 to work as a garage hand. As soon as he reached his 18th birthday he enlisted in the RAF and trained as an armourer. He served in the Middle East, initially in Sudan, and in 1937 was sent to Palestine to join No 6 Squadron. With the threat of war in Europe, however, there was an urgent need for more air observers; Broom volunteered and returned to Britain for training. In February 1939 he joined No 105 Squadron at Harwell, which was equipped with the Fairey Battle. On the day the Second World War broke out No 105 flew to Reims in northern France to support the British Expeditionary Force, and within three weeks Broom had flown his first reconnaissance over Germany. During a raid on Cologne in November 1940 his aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire, but the crew managed to struggle back to England where they were forced to bail out as they ran out of fuel. For the next 12 months Broom served as an instructor. He returned to his squadron in January 1942, just as the Mosquito entered service, and on August 25 was sent to attack a power station near Cologne. As the aircraft flew at treetop height across Belgium, the crew spotted an electricity pylon. The pilot tried to avoid it but the starboard engine struck the top of the pylon and the aircraft ploughed into pine trees. Both men survived the crash, and were picked up by members of the Belgian Resistance. They were escorted to St Jean de Luz by the Belgian-run "Comet" escape line, and Broom crossed the mountains under the aegis of a Spanish Basque guide on September 8; his pilot followed him two weeks later. Twenty-five years after the event Broom returned to St Jean de Luz to meet the woman who had sheltered him from the Germans. After the German advance into the Low Countries on May 10 1940, the Battle squadrons were thrown against Panzers and attacked the crucial bridges across the main rivers, suffering terrible losses. After the fall of France, Broom and some of his comrades managed to reach Cherbourg to board a ship for England. No 105 Squadron was re-equipped with the Blenheim, and during the Battle of Britain Broom attacked the German barges assembling at the Channel ports in preparation for an invasion of England. After spending a period as an instructor at 13 OTU he rejoined 105 Squadron on Mosquitoes, they were in fact the first squadron in the RAF to receive them. Through early 1942 he was navigator on many of the daylight raids carried out by 105 Squadron. In August 1943 Tommy Broom was the chief ground instructor at the Mosquito Training Unit when he first met his namesake Flight Lieutenant Ivor Broom (later Air Marshal Sir Ivor Broom), an experienced low-level bomber pilot. They immediately teamed up and flew together for the remainder of the war, in 163 Squadron as part of the Light Night Strike Force forming a formidable on Mosquitoes including the low level attack on the Dortmund - Ems Canal and completing 58 operations together, including 22 to Berlin. Known as The Flying Brooms Initially they joined No 571 Squadron as part of Air Vice-Marshal Don Bennetts Pathfinder Force, and on May 26 1944 they flew their first operation, an attack on Ludswigshafen. On August 9 they took part in a spectacular night-time mission to drop mines in the Dortmund-Ems Canal. They descended rapidly from 25,000ft to fly along the canal at 150ft, releasing their mines under heavy anti-aircraft fire. The force of eight Mosquitos closed the canal for a number of weeks. Tommy Brooms brilliant navigation had helped ensure the success of the raid, and he was awarded a DFC. The Brooms took part in another daring attack on New Years Day 1945. In order to stem the flow of German reinforcements to the Ardennes, the RAF mounted operations to sever the rail links leading to the area, and the Brooms were sent to block the tunnel at Kaiserslauten. They were approaching the tunnel at low level just as a train was entering it. They dropped their 4,000lb bomb, with a time delay fuse, in the entrance and 11 seconds later it exploded, completely blocking the tunnel – the train did not emerge. Tommy Broom received a Bar to his DFC and his pilot was awarded a DSO. When Ivor Broom was given command of No 163 Squadron, Tommy went with him as the squadrons navigation leader and they flew together until the end of the war. Their last five operations were to Berlin, where searchlights posed a perpetual problem. On one occasion they were coned for as long as a quarter of an hour. After twisting, turning and diving to escape the glare, Ivor Broom asked his disoriented navigator for a course to base. Tommy replied: "Fly north with a dash of west, while I sort myself out." A few weeks later Tommy Broom was awarded a second Bar to his DFC – an extremely rare honour for a bomber navigator. Tommy Broom left the RAF in September 1945, but he and his pilot remained close friends until Sir Ivors death in 2003. Sadly Tommy Broom passed away on 18th May 2010


Warrant Officer Bert Winwood (deceased)
WO A.E. 'Bert' Winwood was a Navigator on Mosquitoes and Beaufighters, flew only with pilot Ray Harrington attached to 603 sqn in the Greek Campaign. Bert did his Navigator training in Canada and in January 1944 was posted to 603 Squadron on Beaufighters, based at Gambut, near Tobruk. From here they launched attacks right across the Mediterranean into Crete, Greece and the Aegean Islands against shipping, harbour installations and enemy aircraft with much success. In December 1944 he was posted to 235 Squadron at RAF Banff flying as navigator on Mosquito's flying in the Banff Strike Wing. In April 1945 he was shot down when returning from a strike in the Kattegat, he and his pilot Ray Harrington avoided capture, and with the help of the Danish resistance made it home to England. After a short rest he continued to fly again from RAF Banff, he left the RAF in 1946. Bert Winwood passed away in 2012.
Wing Commander Robert BrayRobert flew his first tour of 32 ops in 75 (NZ) Squadron on Wellington’s. After a period instructing he joined 105 Squadron PFF on Mosquitos, flying Oboe operations, completing 87 ops by June 1944. In March 1945 he was posted to command 571 Squadron PFF, then commanded 128 Squadron PFF until Feb 1946.
Signatures on item 2
NameInfo


Flying Officer Harold Corbin CGM
Harold Corbin joined the RAF in November 1940 and was sent to the United States to train as a pilot. On completion he returned to England as a Sergeant and after several positions was posted to 235 Squadron at RAF Portreath flying operations on Beaufighters. He completed many missions attacking various ports and enemy shipping on the French coast and in the Bay of Biscay. In 1944 he converted onto Mosquitos and joined 248 Squadron at RAF Banff, part of the Banff Strike Wing. The Banff Wing was to become immortalised for undertaking some of the most dangerous and concentrated attacks on German surface vessels and U-boats in the North Sea and on the Norwegian coastline. He was awarded the CGM in August 1944, and was given a full commission in December 1944. He had flown as co-pilot / observer with Maurice Webb from 1943 until the end of the war.


Flying Officer Maurice Webb DFM
Maurice joined the RAF in 1942, and trained as an observer/ wireless operator/ gunner. In October 1943 he was posted to 235 Squadron based at RAF Portreath, flying Beaufighters attacking shipping and harbour installations. In 1944 he converted to Mosquitos, and joined 248 Squadron, moving on to serve with the Banff Strike Wing until March 1945. He was awarded the DFM in August 1944, and then spent time flying in a RAF Walrus on Air Sea Rescue operations. He had flown with Harold Corbin as his co-pilot / observer from 1943 until the end of the war.
Artist Details : Ivan Berryman
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Ivan Berryman


Ivan Berryman

Latest info : At the beginning of 2010, Ivan is working on the partner painting to the fantastic large World War One aviation combat painting which was painted in 2009. The World War Two partner painting will be the same massive size of 78 inches by 36 inches. The scene will show the battle above Convoy CW8 in the English Channel on 25th July 1940. Ivan chose this scene because it features several aircraft types and some quite well-known fighter pilots. In the picture are Spitfires, Hurricanes, Bf.109s and Stukas. The Stukas were bombing the convoy and British aircraft of 64 Sqn, 54 Sqn and 111 Sqn were scrambled to defend the ships, but were outnumbered by five to one. Because of the view, Dover itself is not visible in the scene, but the action is taking place above a sunlit sea where the convoy is clearly visible under attack. Over the next few months progress photos of this fantatstic painting will be shown.

Over the last 30 years, Ivan Berryman has become a leading aviation, motor racing and naval artist. In this time, the subjects of his paintings have been wide and varied as he has deliberately strived to include some of the lesser know aircraft, ships and events in his portfolio, which includes aircraft like the Defiant, TSR2, Beaufort, ships including MTBs and corvettes, and around 100 different aircraft of the first world war. In addition to this he has taken new approaches to the classic subjects of his field, including the Dambuster Lancasters, Battle of Britain Spitfires, Bf109s and Hurricanes, HMS Hood, Bismarck and the best known naval ships, as well as some iconic sporting moments. In his own words : Art and aviation have been like a brother and sister to me. We have grown up together, learned together and made our adult lives together. But you do not have to have an appreciation of aircraft to admire the graceful lines of a Spitfire or the functional simplicity of a Focke-Wulf 190. They are themselves a work of art and they cry out to be painted - not as machines of war and destruction, but as objects of beauty, born of necessity and function, yet given a life and iconic classicism beyond their original calling. My interest and love of art and aircraft was gifted to me by my father, a designer and aeronautical engineer of considerable repute. Denis Berryman C.Eng. FRAeS. He gave me his eyes, his passion, his dedication and his unwavering professionalism. I owe him everything. And I miss him terribly. A love of art and of beautiful and interesting things takes you on a journey. You discover new interests, new fascinations, and you want to paint them. You want to paint them in their environment, in their element. Whether it is an aeroplane, a warship, a racing car or a beautiful woman, their gift to an artist is the same: Their lines, their texture and the way that light and shadows give them form. These are the food and oxygen of an artist. Not the paint and the canvas. These are mere tools. The secret is in the passion and the perception...





Ivan with some of his original paintings in the originals gallery at Cranston Fine Arts and in his studio.

More about Ivan Berryman

Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

More about Robert Taylor

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

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 So often overshadowed by its own achievements as a ground attack aircraft, Hawkers mighty Typhoon also proved itself a formidable adversary in air to air combat as demonstrated by the successes of F/Lt (later Wing Commander) J R Baldwin who claimed no fewer than three Bf.109G4s in the skies above Kent on 20th January 1943 in a single sortie. Baldwin finished the war as the highest-scoring Typhoon pilot of all with 15 confirmed victories, one shared, one probable and four damaged. He was tragically lost over Korea in 1952 whilst on an exchange posting with the USAF, but is depicted here at the peak of his powers, flying Typhoon 1B DN360 (PR-A) of 609 Sqn.

Typhoon! by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Half Price! - £75.00
 The print depicts the moment as the first Hurricane of 46 squadron of the Royal Air Force, piloted by Sqn Ldr Kenneth Cross, without arrestor hooks or wires approaches the ill-fated carrier HMS Glorious. during the evacuation of Norway in June 1940.  Bing later said <i>We showed them they were wrong</i>. The Fleet Air Arm pilots were delighted saying <i>Marvelous bloody marvelous, now we will get them too</i>.  All had landed safely by 4.30am on June 8th.
Moment of Truth by Keith Woodcock. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
 On the night of 12th/13th November 1940, Whitley V P5005 found itself slightly off course above the primary target due to problems with the intercom. Changing instead to a secondary target, some railway marshalling yards near Cologne, Pilot Officer Leonard Cheshire suddenly felt his aircraft rocked by a series of violent explosions that caused a severe fire to break out in the fuselage, filling the cockpit with acrid black smoke. As DY-N plunged some 2,000 feet, Cheshire managed to regain control and the fire was eventually extinguished. For bringing his aircraft safely home to 102 Squadron's base after being airborne for eight and half hours, Cheshire was awarded a DSO.

A DSO for Cheshire by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £550.00
 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Half Price! - £95.00

 A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943. Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties.

A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Half Price! - £45.00
One of the most advanced aircraft of World War II, the AR234 with its twin turbojets could carry out its high altitude reconnaissance or bombing duties at speed which made interception by Allied aircraft virtually impossible.
Luftwaffe Arado 234 B-2 by Barry Price.
Half Price! - £30.00
 On 24th January 1945, whilst taking part in Operation Meridian, S/Lt Arthur Page's Grumman Avenger JZ469 of 849 NAS suffered an electrical fire whilst climbing toward the target in formation and the decision was made to abort the mission and make an emergency landing back on HMS Victorious. Page's aircraft is shown here moments before touchdown under the watchful eye of the Landing Signals Officer.

Avenger's Return by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
P40 Kittyhawks of No.3 Squadron RAAF based at Ta Qali Airfield, Malta.

Over Grand Harbour by Anthony Saunders.
Half Price! - £20.00

NAVAL PRINTS

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  T class submarine HMS Thorn surfaces during the work up exercises off the west coast of Scotland in late 1941. Taking part is an escort sloop of the Black Swan class and a Sunderland from 201 Squadron, RAF Coastal Command.

Working Up by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Grand Harbour, Malta, April 1932. The R-Class battleship HMS Revenge slips majestically past the carrier HMS Furious as she lies at anchor as three of her Fairey IIIFs fly overhead on a routine training sortie.

HMS Furious with HMS Revenge by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Completed in May 1941, HMS Victorious had been in commission just nine days when her pilots encountered and attacked the Bismarck. She is seen here in August 1942 with HMS Eagle astern of her.

HMS Victorious by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00

 HMS Intrepid embarks some of her landing craft during the Falklands conflict of 1982.
HMS Intrepid by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
RFA Fort Austin makes a leisurely rendezvous at sunset with the Polaris submarine HMS Renown on patrol somewhere in mid ocean. Soon a rubber inflatable will be launched from the Fort, and mail and fresh fruit and vegetables will be transferred before darkness sets in and makes the operation more hazardous.

The Rendezvous by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00
DHM1449GS.  Tirpitz Passing Through Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman.

Tirpitz Passing Through Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Type 42 HMS Southampton (D90), Type 22 Beaver (F93), Type 42 Manchester (D95) and Type 21 Amazon (F169) formate during a World cruise on which they visited 17 countries in 9 months.

Around the World by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

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 Vielsalm, Belgium, 22nd December 1944.  Men of the 508th PIR, along with the rest of the 82nd Airborne Division were rushed to the Ardennes and deployed in an attempt to halt the onslaught of 6th SS Panzer Army, specifically Kampfgruppe Peiper.

Holding the Line by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00
Lieut. George Cairns of the South Staffordshire Regiment at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma, 13th March 1944, along with the 3rd/6th Gurkha Rifles.
Lieutenant George Cairns VC, at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma 13th March 1944 by David Rowlands (GL)
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 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

D-Day Gold Beach, 6th June 1944 by Simon Smith.
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 Pioneers were among the first British troops to land on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day, by 1st August 1944 there were over 35,500 pioneers in Normandy. The painting shows the various activities of the pioneers during the D-Day landings.

Sword Beach by Terence Cuneo.
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 Having made contact the previous evening with troops of 4th Infantry Division pushing inland from Utah Beach, paratroopers of the 101st Airborne division The Screaming Eagles help mop up the pockets of German resistance in their general advance towards Carentan.

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland.
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 St Mere Eglise, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  U.S. Paratroops of the 82nd <i>All American</i> Airborne Division, descend on occupied France.

First to Fight by David Pentland.
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DHM1079GL.  The 1st Battalion Duke of Wellingtons Regiment at the Battle of Sittang Bridge, Burma, February 1942 by David Rowlands.

The 1st Battalion Duke of Wellingtons Regiment at the Battle of Sittang Bridge, Burma, February 1942 by David Rowlands (GL)
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The Allied breakthrough into the Normandy plain, against heavy German opposition. Filed marshall Montgomery claimed that Operation Goodwood had two major aims – the first being to break out from the beaches and the other to destroy the German armoured reserves and draw them away from the US forces that were preparing for Operation Cobra in the western sector.  The plan for the breakout began with a massive aerial bombardment, using the strategic air forces large bombers to decimate the German defending forces then Lt-General Richard OConnors VIII Corps comprising three whole armoured divisions – 11th, 7th and Guards - and spearheaded by Major-General Pip Roberts 11th would then rush forward, overwhelm the defending Germans and causing the armoured forces to move forward and break out from the beach areas. To cover the flanks the Canadians would fight their way to Caen, while the British 3rd Infantry and 51st Highland Divisions would cover the left flank,  and move further eastward.

Operation Goodwood, Caen, Normandy, 18th-19th July, 1944 by David Rowlands (C)
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