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Gloster Gladiator Mk II L8011 YK-O. by M A Kinnear.


Gloster Gladiator Mk II L8011 YK-O. by M A Kinnear.

Aircraft History: Built by Gloster Aircraft, L8011 was one of a batch of 28 Gladiators delivered in September 1938 to the Royal Air Force. Allocated to 80 Squadron, L8011 saw service in North Africa and Greece, until it was transferred to the Royal Hellenic Air Force, 15th December 1940.

Squadron Leader Marmaduke T St. John Pat Pattle, DFC: Born on 3rd July 1914 in Butterworth, Cape Province, South Africa, Pat Pattle joined 80 Squadron in 1937. The Squadron was sent to Egypt in April 1938, and Pattle became a flight commander in 1939. During August 1940 the Squadron moved up to the Libyan border. Whilst escorting a Lysander, Pattles flight was engaged by a force of Italian fighters. Pattle (claiming 2) was forced to bale out inside Italian territory, but returned to base the next day. The Squadron moved to Greece in November in support of Greek forces on the Albanian border. Pattle was awarded the DFC in February 1941. In March he was awarded a bar to the DFC promoted to Squadron Leader and given command of 33 squadron equipped with Hawker Hurricanes Mk I. By this time he was credited with 23 victories. Due to the chaotic conditions during the British and Greek retreat, records were lost. However, relying on personal records and memories, it appears that his score of victories was 50 (possibly as high as 60) making him the highest scoring RAF pilot of the war. On 20th April 1941, he led the combined remnants of No.s 33 and 80 squadrons from Eleusis airfield. Although suffering from influenza and fatigue and on his third sortie of the day, Pattle led the remaining Hurricanes to intercept a German formation over Eleusis Bay. He was seen to shoot down a Bf110 but two other Bf110s then attacked him. Pattle was hit and he was seen slumped forward in the cockpit of his aircraft as it fell into the Bay.
Item Code : AP0012Gloster Gladiator Mk II L8011 YK-O. by M A Kinnear. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 30cm)none£14.00

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Extra Details : Gloster Gladiator Mk II L8011 YK-O. by M A Kinnear.
About all editions :
80 Squadron was formed at Montrose on the 10th August 1917, and saw action in France, specialising in the ground attack role. Remaining in Belgium after the war, they moved to Egypt in May 1919 where it was renumbered 56 the following year. 80 squadron re-formed at Kenley on 8th March 1937, equipped with Gloster Gauntlets and Gladiators. Posted to Egypt in May 1938, the squadron joined No.33 to form a Gladiator Wing for defence of the Suez canal. When Italy entered the war, 80 squadron was stationed at Amriya equipped with Gladiators and one Hurricane. In November 1940, the squadron moved to Greece and in February 1941, the squadron equipped with a mixture of Gladiators and Hurricanes was used on bomber escort duties. In March the Germans came to the aid of their Italian Allies and on 24th March the squadron was evacuated to Crete and then to Palestine. In November 1941 they returned to the Western Desert to take part in the relief of Tobruk. During 1942-43, the squadron was on defence duties and convoy escort work over the Eastern Mediterranean. Posted to Italy in January 1944 and then onto the UK, they were re-equipped with Spitfires Mk IX. 80 Squadron then took part in bomber escorts, sweeps and armed reconnaissance. They began to re-equip with the Hawker Tempest, and were used for anti V1 operations. 80 Squadron was posted to the continent to support the Arnhem landings and roamed over Germany in the ground attack role. They remained in Germany as part of the occupation force until 1949. It was then sent to Hong Kong on air defence duties equipped with Spitfires and Hornets between 1949 and 1955. Disbanded in 1955, 80 Squadron reformed in Germany as a P R Squadron equipped with Canberras PR7. They finally disbanded in September 1969.

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
GladiatorGLOSTER GLADIATOR: A continuation form the Gloster Gauntlet aircraft the Gloster Gladiator (SS37) becoming designated the F.7/30 was named Gladiator on the 1st July 1935. The first 70 Gladiators had Under wing machine guns (Vickers or Lewis) before the browning became standard The first aircraft arrived at Tangmere airfield on in February 1937 to no. 72 squadron. at the outbreak of world war two a total of 218 Gladiators had been received by the Royal air force with a total of 76 on active service. They served also in the Middle eats and in 1940 when Italy joined the war was nearly the only front line fighter in the middle east. Between 1939 and 1941. the Gloster Gladiator flew in many war zones. flying in France, Greece, Norway, Crete Egypt Malta and Aden. The Aircraft claimed nearly 250 air victories. It stayed in front line duties until 1942, then becoming fighter trainer, and other sundry roles. It continued in these roles until the end of world war two. The Naval equivalent the Sea Gladiator a short service in the Middle east and European waters. A Total of 746 aircraft were built of these 98 were Sea Gladiators.. Performance. speed: 250mph at 17,500 feet, 257 mph at 14,600 Range 430 miles. Armament: Two fixed .3-03 browning machine guns

 

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The Allied breakthrough into the Normandy plain, against heavy German opposition. Filed marshall Montgomery claimed that Operation Goodwood had two major aims – the first being to break out from the beaches and the other to destroy the German armoured reserves and draw them away from the US forces that were preparing for Operation Cobra in the western sector.  The plan for the breakout began with a massive aerial bombardment, using the strategic air forces large bombers to decimate the German defending forces then Lt-General Richard OConnors VIII Corps comprising three whole armoured divisions – 11th, 7th and Guards - and spearheaded by Major-General Pip Roberts 11th would then rush forward, overwhelm the defending Germans and causing the armoured forces to move forward and break out from the beach areas. To cover the flanks the Canadians would fight their way to Caen, while the British 3rd Infantry and 51st Highland Divisions would cover the left flank,  and move further eastward.

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