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Officer, 6th Foot 1735 by P H Smitherman

Officer, 6th Foot 1735 by P H Smitherman

This image, taken from a contemporary portrait, shows an officer of the 6th Foot. He is wearing neither gorget nor sash, and so is not on duty. His very elegant coat bears little resemblance in design and lacing to those worn by the men of the regiment. This officer is wearing an aiguillette on his right shoulder. This was commonly worn as the mark of a commissioned officer, or non-commissioned officer in the infantry, and was worn by all ranks in some cavalry regiments. The origin of these shoulder knots is obscure and has been the subject of much speculation. they have been said to have been originally, among other things, picketing ropes for horses, no doubt on account of the pegs at their ends, similar to the pegs used today on picketing ropes, and ropes for tying up hay for horses used by foraging parties. Such explanations are hardly satisfactory because it is difficult to see why an infantry officer or N.C.O. should want such things, and in the cavalry one might have expected them to be worn by troopers, but not by officers or N.C.O.s. They were at this time worn by servants in private houses - they still appear in some of the royal liveries - and we have records of opinion from those who had to wear these adornments, more fit for flunkeys. They could obviously not have originated for the servants in either picketing or foraging ropes, and it is possible that they were merely decorative additions to the dress, added during a time when such decoration was not considered unmanly. They disappeared during the Napoleonic wars, but were revived in the dress of some cavalry regiments afterwards and are now worn by officers and N.C.O.s of the Household Cavalry and by some staff officers. The 6th Foot were another of the Six Old Corps and retained their ancient badge of an antelope on their grenadier caps. They won this badge at Saragossa in 1710 where they won a resounding victory over French and Spanish cavalry, capturing, among other things, a Moorish flag bearing the device of an antelope and, as the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, they have retained the badge to this day.
Item Code : PHS0010Officer, 6th Foot 1735 by P H Smitherman - This Edition
PRINT One available.

Image size 14 inches x 10 inches (36cm x 25cm)none24.00

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