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Officer, 1st Guards 1775 by P H Smitherman


Officer, 1st Guards 1775 by P H Smitherman

This image, based on actual uniforms, shown an officer of the 1st Guards in ceremonial dress.On parade he would be armed with a spontoon as well as his sword. The officers of the other Guards regiments would have been dressed very similarly. A notable feature are the bastion loops of gold lace on the lapels. These became very popular and were adopted by many regiments. All of these bars and loops of lace, of course, developed from the button-holes originally on the coats. Hitherto the skirts of the coat had been lined with the facing colour, blue in the Foot Guards, but here they are white, and it was now almost universal for skirts to be lined like this. These white turn-backs, fastened with an ornamental device, survived in vestigial form on the tails of the coatee until the Crimean war, after which the whole coatee was replaced by a tunic, cut in modern fashion. The braiding on the mess dress of captains and above in the Royal Navy still shows the outline of the pockets worn on coats of this period.
Item Code : PHS0018Officer, 1st Guards 1775 by P H Smitherman - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT One available.

Image size 14 inches x 10 inches (36cm x 25cm)none£24.00

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