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Officer, 23rd Foot 1790 by P H Smitherman


Officer, 23rd Foot 1790 by P H Smitherman

Contemporary pictures and existing items of clothing have provided the basis for this image, which shows further development of the fusiliers uniform. fusilier caps were to be like the grenadier caps only smaller. The plate with the royal arms in front of the cap has gone, and has been replaced by a badge, and there is an arrangement of gold cords at the back, invisible in the picture, ending in two large tassels. The collar of the coat has now been turned up again and has begun to assume the form which it has since retained. The elaboration of the gold lace on the cuffs and lapels is in sharp contrast with the simplicity noted in the previous image. Being a fusilier, and armed on service with a fusil, he wears a shoulder belt with a pouch as well as a sword belt. Black gaiters have replaced white spatterdashes, except in the Foot guards. The white ones were first replaced by brown - a more suitable colour, obviously, for service - but they were not considered very smart, and so were blacked and finally replaced with black gaiters. As the 23rd were allowed to wear a badge, the Prince of Wales feathers, it appears on the gorget instead of the royal arms. The plate on the shoulder-belt, carrying a regimental device, was an innovation at about this time, and was worn by all ranks. Thus the soldier now carried an easily recognisable sign of his regiment, similar to the cap badge today. Previously, in most cases, unless a man belonged to one of the few regiments permitted to display a badge, he could be identified only by such details as his buttons, or the pattern of his lace. The 23rd, or Royal Welsh Fusiliers, were raised in 1689. The notable feature of their dress today is the bunch of black ribbons worn on the collar at the back, a survival of the ribbons worn before 1805 to protect the collar from the grease of the pigtail. 
Item Code : PHS0020Officer, 23rd Foot 1790 by P H Smitherman - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT One available.

Image size 14 inches x 10 inches (36cm x 25cm)none£24.00

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