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No.54 Sqn RAF

Founded : 15th May 1916
Country : UK
Fate :
Known Aircraft Codes : KL, DL, HF

Audax omnia perpeti - Boldness to endure anything

No. 54 Squadron was formed on the 5th of May 1916 at Castle Bromwich. The squadron was equipped with BE2C's and Avro 504's and was part of the home defence force. Shortly after 54 squadron changed to day fighter duties and moved to France then equipped with Sopwith Pups. Their role was to escort bombers and attack observation balloons. Near the end of the great war 54 squadron was re -quipped with Sopwith Camels and tasked with ground attack as well as fighter sorties. In February 1919, the squadron returned to RAF Yatesbury and on 2nd October 1919 54 squadron was disbanded. On the 15th of January 1930, 54 squadron was reformed at RAF Hornchurch as a fighter squadron equipped initially with Siskin aircraft. The Siskins were subsequently replaced with Bulldog fighters and in September 1936 54 squadron was re-equipped with Gloster Gauntlets and in April 1937, they recieved Gloster Gladiators. In March 1939 the squadron recieved the new Supermarine Spitfire. After the outbreak of world war two, 54 Squadron was given the duties of patrolling the Kent coast, until having to support and give air cover to the evacuation of Dunkirk in May and June 1940. The squadron was heavily involved during the Battle of Britain until November 1940 and after the Battle of Britain had ceased the squadron moved in November 1940 to RAF Castletown where its duties were coastal patrols. In June 1942 the squadron moved to RAF Wellingore to prepare for the squadron moving to Australia. In January 1943 54 squadron joined No.1 Wing of the Royal Australian Air Force. The Spitfires of the squadron were given the role of air defence duties against Japanese air attacks in the Darwin area. After the war had ended 54 squadron was disbanded in Melbourne on the 31st of October 1945, although the squadron name continued when on the 15th of November 1945 No.183 Squadron was renumbered 54 Squadron and flew initially Hawker Tempests. Taking up jet aircraft, the squadron subsequently used Vampires, Meteors, Hunters, Phantom and Jaguars before disbanding on 11th March 2005. 54 Squadron reformed on 5th September 2005 as an ISTAR (Intelligence Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance ) unit equipped with Sentry, Nimrod and Sentinel aircraft.

No.54 Sqn RAF


Latest No.54 Sqn RAF Artwork Releases !
 The Spitfires of 54 Squadron, quickly scrambled from nearby Hornchurch, clash with the Me109s from 1./JG51 over Kent.  Below, Me110s from KPRG210 are about to receive unwelcome attention as the rest of the Spitfires hurtle down upon them and in the distance, a group of Hurricanes rip through a dense formation of Do17s from KG76 as they struggle back to France.  What clouds there are will be unlikely to give much sanctuary and, for the onlookers on the ground far below, the skies will soon be filled with weaving trails of smoke and debris. For nearly a week the Luftwaffe had thrown everything they had into the attack on southern England in order to annihilate RAF Fighter Command, in preparation for Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain.  And, heavily outnumbered, the young RAF Spitfire and Hurricane pilots of Fighter Command had so far repelled them, at a cost.  But on Sunday 18 August 1940, the Germans launched the heaviest formations of aircraft seen in the battle so far.  This was to be a grinding day of relentless assaults on the airfields of southern England, the hardest day of the Battle of Britain.
Valiant Response by Robert Taylor.
 On August 12th, 1940 the Luftwaffe turned their full attention to the RAF's forward fighter bases and radar stations with the intent to obliterate them once and for all.  The outcome of the Battle of Britain hung in the balance.  It was late in the afternoon of Sunday, 18 August 1940.  The previous week had seen the hardest days of fighting in the Battle of Britain as the young pilots of the RAF Fighter Command had engaged in deadly duels with the Luftwaffe.  Bystanders gazed cautiously upwards at the weaving contrails in the clear blue skies over southern England as they anxiously awaited the outcome.  For just a moment, all was at peace:  A gentle breeze floated across the airfield at RAF Hornchurch as the exhausted young pilots of 54 Squadron could rest for a few brief minutes and reflect on their own previous two encounters with the enemy that day.  The Luftwaffe had thrown everything at them in the past few days, but today had been the toughest of them all.  And then the calm was shattered by the shrill tones of the alarm, the Luftwaffe had launched another huge raid of over 300 aircraft across the Channel, and it looked like Hornchurch was the target.  Hornchurch Scramble, portrays the moment as 54 Squadron's commanding officer, Squadron Leader James Leathart, taxis out at Hornchurch to prepare for take-off.  Quickly following, the aircraft of New Zealander Colin Gray is guided out from dispersal by his ground crew.  Gray would claim 3 Bf110s in the encounter and would eventually become the top scoring New Zealand Ace of the war.
Hornchurch Scramble by Robert Taylor.
 Sqn Ldr James Leathart watches another of his victims, a Heinkel He.111, slowly roll over in its death throes above the beaches near Dunkirk on 21st May 1940, flying Spitfire Mk.1 P9389 (KL-A) of 54 Sqn, based at Hornchurch.  All but one of his many claimed victories were scored in this aircraft which was eventually lost in October 1940 whilst being flown by Plt Off C Stewart, who baled out and survived the incident relatively unscathed.

A Quick Despatch by Ivan Berryman.
 The afternoon of 25th July 1940 was a desperate one for the already exhausted fighter pilots of the RAF defending the South coast of England.  As convoy CW8 made its way through the English Channel, sixty JU.87 Stukas and forty JU.88 bombers launched a brutal attack on the ships below, backed up by fighter cover of over 50 Messerscmitt Bf.109s.  Eight Spitfires of 64 Sqn (Kenley) were scrambled, together with twelve Spitfires of 54 Sqn (Hornchurch) and Hurricanes of 111 Sqn from Croydon.  The British pilots found themselves massively outnumbered, but nevertheless put up a spirited fight against the teeming enemy.  This painting shows Spitfires of 54 Sqn entering the fray, the pilots scattering as they choose their targets and go after the JU.87s. To the right of this, Bf.109Es of JG.26 are roaring in to join battle, whilst Adolf Gallands aircraft engages a Hurricane of 111 Sqn.

A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman.

No.54 Sqn RAF Artwork



Spitfires of No.54 squadron during the Battle of Britain by Graeme Lothian. (P)


A Quick Despatch by Ivan Berryman.


Spitfire Over Tower Bridge by John Young. (AP)


Victory Above Dover by Ivan Berryman.


A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman.

Hornchurch Scramble by Robert Taylor.

Valiant Response by Robert Taylor.


Richthofens Flying Circus by Nicolas Trudgian.


54(F) Squadron Farewell by Michael Rondot

Aces for : No.54 Sqn RAF
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Colin Falkland Gray27.50
Alan Christopher Deere22.00The signature of Alan Christopher Deere features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
D A P McMullen19.00
Ernest James Salter9.00
George Henry Hackwill9.00
Francis Mansel Kitto9.00
Reginald Stuart Maxwell9.00
Bob Foster7.00The signature of Bob Foster features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Henry Hollingdrake Maddocks7.00
Oliver Manners Sutton7.00
Frank Neville Hudson6.00
William Victor Strugnell6.00
Michael Edward Gonne5.00
George Arthur Hyde5.00
Oliver Stewart5.00
Aircraft for : No.54 Sqn RAF
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by No.54 Sqn RAF. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Avro 504N

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Manufacturer : Avro

Avro 504N

Full profile not yet available.

BE2C

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BE2C

Full profile not yet available.

Bulldog

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Manufacturer : Bristol
Number Built : 400

Bulldog

The Bristol Bulldog was a British Royal Air Force single-seat biplane fighter designed during the 1920s by The Bulldog was designed by Frank Barnwell, the Chief Designer of the Bristol company (or Bristol Aeroplane Company,) with over 400 Bulldogs produced, that arguably became the most famous aircraft during the RAF's inter-war period. The Bristol Bulldog never saw combat service with the RAF, though during the Abyssinia Crisis of 1935-36, Bristol Bulldogs were sent to the Sudan to reinforce Middle East Command. one interesting note. Douglas Bader,The second world war ace, lost both of his legs when his Bristol Bulldog crashed while he was performing unauthorised flying Aerobatics at Woodley airfield near Reading. The Bulldog was a Single-seat day and night fighter. All metal construction with fabric covering. Manufactured by Bristol Aeroplane Co. Ltd, Filton, Bristol. Her engine was a 490 hp Bristol Jupiter VIIF, with a max speed of 174mph and a ceiling of 27,000 ft. She had two synchronised Vickers 0.303in machine guns.

Camel



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Manufacturer : Sopwith
Production Began : 1916
Number Built : 5714

Camel

SOPWITH CAMEL: was the most successful fighter of World War one. Claiming almost 3,000 air victories. The prototype of the Sopwith camel first flew in December 1916, and its first combat mission began in June 1917. joined 4 squadron RNAS based near Dunkirk. The first Royal Flying Corp squadron to receive the aircraft was no. 70 squadron. The Sopwith camel was the first designed fighter to have two forward firing machine guns. Its design gave it amazing maneuverability and aerobatic qualities. and was perfectly suited for aerial dog fighting. Squadron after squadron was re equipped with the camel and by the end of February 1918 13 squadrons were fully operational with the aircraft along the western front. Also used on the Italian Front with 3 squadrons equipped. This figure increased with a total of 19 squadrons equipped on the western front by August 1918. This included two squadrons no. 151 and 152 for night fighter duties. in June 1918. There was also a naval version of the Sopwith camel. the 2F.1s which gradually replaced the Sopwith Pup and other naval aircraft. The Naval version most memorable fete was done by Lt S D Culley who took off from a towed wood platform and destroyed the Zeppelin L.53 on the 10th August 1918. also on the 18th July six aircraft took off from the forward deck of HMS Furious to bomb the Zeppelin base at Tondern which they successfully did destroying two Zeppelins L.54 and L.60. This was the first time carrier borne aircraft had destroyed a land base installation. In total 5597 F.1s and 317 2F.1s were ordered but there may have been 200 less built. Performance. speed: 113mph at 10,000 feet. service ceiling 19,000 feet. Armament: two fixed forward firing Vickers .303 machine Guns. or one .303 forward firing and one .303 Lewis Gun

Gauntlet

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Manufacturer : Gloster

Gauntlet

Full profile not yet available.

Gladiator



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Manufacturer : Gloster
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1945
Number Built : 746

Gladiator

GLOSTER GLADIATOR: A continuation form the Gloster Gauntlet aircraft the Gloster Gladiator (SS37) becoming designated the F.7/30 was named Gladiator on the 1st July 1935. The first 70 Gladiators had Under wing machine guns (Vickers or Lewis) before the browning became standard The first aircraft arrived at Tangmere airfield on in February 1937 to no. 72 squadron. at the outbreak of world war two a total of 218 Gladiators had been received by the Royal air force with a total of 76 on active service. They served also in the Middle eats and in 1940 when Italy joined the war was nearly the only front line fighter in the middle east. Between 1939 and 1941. the Gloster Gladiator flew in many war zones. flying in France, Greece, Norway, Crete Egypt Malta and Aden. The Aircraft claimed nearly 250 air victories. It stayed in front line duties until 1942, then becoming fighter trainer, and other sundry roles. It continued in these roles until the end of world war two. The Naval equivalent the Sea Gladiator a short service in the Middle east and European waters. A Total of 746 aircraft were built of these 98 were Sea Gladiators.. Performance. speed: 250mph at 17,500 feet, 257 mph at 14,600 Range 430 miles. Armament: Two fixed .3-03 browning machine guns

Hunter

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Manufacturer : Hawker
Retired : 1971
Number Built : 1972

Hunter

Hawker Hunter F-1 to Fr-10 jet fighter and fighter reconnaissance aircraft first flew with No43 squadron Royal Air Force in July 1954. The Hawker Hunter continued service until 1971. The Hunters were used by two RAF display units, the Black Arrows of No. 111 Squadron who set a record by looping and barrel rolling in formation 22 Hunters, and later the Blue Diamonds of 92 Squadron that used 16 Hunters. A total of 1,972 Hunters were produced by Hawker Siddeley and under licence.

Jaguar



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Jaguar

Full profile not yet available.

Meteor

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Manufacturer : Gloster
Production Began : 1944
Number Built : 3947

Meteor

The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' first operational jet. Designed by George Carter, and built by the Gloster Aircraft Company, Armstrong-Whitworth, the Meteor first flew in 1943 and commenced operations on 27 July 1944 with 616 Squadron of the Royal Air Force (RAF). The Gloster Meteor was not an aerodynamically advanced aircraft but the Gloster design team succeeded in producing an effective jet fighter that served the RAF and other air forces for decades. Meteors saw action with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in the Korean War and other air forces used the Meteor. The Royal Danish Air Force, The Belgian Air Force and Isreali Air Force kept the Meteor in service until the early 1970's. A Total of 3947 meteors were built and two Meteors, WL419 and WA638, remain in service with the Martin-Baker company as ejection seat testbeds.

Nimrod

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Nimrod

Full profile not yet available.

Phantom

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Manufacturer : McDonnell Douglas
Production Began : 1960
Retired : 1992
Number Built : 5195

Phantom

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber produced for the U.S. Navy by Mcdonnell Douglas. It became a major part of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and American Air Force. The Phantom F-4 saw service with all American forces during the Vietnam war serving as a fighter and ground attack aircraft. The Phantom first saw service in 1960 but continued in service until the 1980’s (being replaced by the F-15 and F-16 ) The last Phantoms saw service during the Gulf war in 1991 being used for reconnaissance. Other nations also used the Phantom to great success. The Israeli Air Force used them during various Arab-Israeli wars and the Phantom also saw service in the Iranian Air Force during the Iran Iraq War. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1981, with a total of 5,195 built. The Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy flew versions based on the F-4. The British Phantoms were powered by Rolls Royce Spey engines and also received British avionics, under the names pf Phantom FG.1 and Phantom FGR.2. The last British Phantoms served with 74 Squadron until they were dispanded in 1992.

Pup

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Manufacturer : Sopwith
Production Began : 1916
Number Built : 1770

Pup

The Sopwith Pup was a single-bay, single-seat biplane aircraft with a fabric-covered, wooden framework and staggered, equal-span wings. The prototype and most production Pups were powered by the 80 hp (60 kW) Le Rhone engine and armed with a single 0.303 inch (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun which was synchronized with the Sopwith - Kauper synchronizer. The first Sopwth Pup prototype was completed in February 1916 with flight tests in late March. The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) were impressed and ordered two more prototypes, then placed a production order. Deliveries of the Pups started in August 1916. The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) also placed large orders for Pups. The RFC orders were built by Standard Motor Co and Whitehead Aircraft who had both been sub-contracted. Deliveries did not commence until the beginning of 1917. The Sopwith Pup was eventually outclassed by newer German fighters, but some continued in service on the Western Front until the end of 1917. The remaining Sopwith Pups were used for Home Defence and training units. The Pup's docile flying characteristics also made it ideal for use in Aircraft Carrier Carrier deck landing and takeoff experiments and many were used on Royal Navy Battleships. A total of 1,770 Pups were built by Sopwith (96), Standard Motor Co (850), Whitehead Aircraft (820), and Willaim Beardmore and co building 30 aircraft

Sentry

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Sentry

Full profile not yet available.

Spitfire



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Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

Tempest



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Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1943
Retired : 1949
Number Built : 1395

Tempest

The Hawker Tempest was a much improved development of the Typhoon and first flew in June 1943. and started service with the RAF in April 1944. mainly serving in the attack role in Europe against ground targets including the V1 Flying Bomb installations. It remained in service after the war until 1949 when it was eventually replaced by the Jet Aircraft. but continued for another 4 years in the Indian and Pakistan air forces. In total no less than 1395 Hawker Tempests were built. Speed: 426mph at 18,500 feet, Crew One. Range 800 miles. Armament: Four 20mm Hispano cannons mounted in the wings and a bomb payload of upto 2,000 lbs.

Vampire

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Vampire

Full profile not yet available.
Signatures for : No.54 Sqn RAF
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Flight Lieutenant Peter Allen
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Flight Lieutenant Peter Allen

Completing his pilot training at No.1 OTU in Canada, he was assigned to 54 Sqn on Spitfires which had been relocated from Britain to Darwin, Northern Australia in 1943. The squadron carried out Air Defence patrols against Japanese aircraft and high-level reconnaissance flights.




Air Vice-Marshal Sir Roger Austin KCB AFC
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Air Vice-Marshal Sir Roger Austin KCB AFC

Officer Commanding 54(F) Sqn Hawker Hunter 1968-1969




Air Commodore Terry Carlton
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Air Commodore Terry Carlton

Officer Commanding 54(F) Sqn Jaguar 1974-1976




Wing Commander Neil Connell OBE
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Wing Commander Neil Connell OBE

Officer Commanding 54(F) Sqn 2003-2005



Lt Col John W Dalton
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Lt Col John W Dalton

Royal Air Force Dakota pilot participated in the Berlin Airlift and later commander 54 Air Refueling Squadron (AETC) from 29th Jun 1987 to 18th July 1989.



Air Commodore Alan Deere DSO DFC*
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Air Commodore Alan Deere DSO DFC*

21 / 9 / 1995Died : 21 / 9 / 1995
21 / 9 / 1995Ace : 22.00 Victories
Air Commodore Alan Deere DSO DFC*

Top scoring New Zealand Ace with 22 victories, Deere was born in Auckland on December 12th 1917. Alan Deere would become one of the RAFs finest pilots. Joining the RAF in 1937, in September 1938 Al Deere was posted to No.54 Sqn at the time flying Gloster Gladiators, then in early 1940 the Squadron converted to Spitfires. His first brush with death happened when his oxygen failed while at altitude and ke blacked out, coming to only in time to pull his aircraft out of a dive and certain death. At the beginning of May 1940 Deere took part in the intensive air war over Dunkirk and on 23rd May 1940 Deere took part in a daring rescue operation. He and Pilot Officer Allen escorted their flight commander, James Leathart, to France where he was to land a Miles Master trainer and pick up the CO of 74 Squadron who had made a forced landing on the airfield at Calais-Marck. While the pick up was made, Alan Deere was at low level with Pilot Officer Allen at 8000 feet. As Flight Commander James Leathart prepared for take off in the Master, Pilot Offcier Allen spotted a flight o Bf109s coming their way.

Deere scored his first victory, as a strafing Bf109 pulled out of its dive, presenting a perfect target. Deere fired a short burst and the aircraft stalled and then crashed into the sea. Deere, climbing to help Allen, crossed the path of two 109’s, one of which turned towards him. Deere also turned, firing at the second one, which rolled over and dived away. Pursuing the first one, he caught up at treetop height and pursued him, firing off his remaining ammunition before the German headed for home. During the whole event Deere and Allen accoutned for three Bf109s shot down and three damaged. All three aircraft returned to their base at RAF Hornchurch.

During four days - 23rd to 29th May - Deere shot down three Bf109’s and three Bf110’s but his luck ran out and he was shot down over Dunkirk while attacking a Dornier Do17 and luckily managed a forced landing in Belgium where he optained a bicycle and cycled to Dunkirk where he managed to get on a destroyer and returned to Hornchurch within 30 hours of taking off. In June he was decorated with the DFC by the King at a special ceremony at Hornchurch. Alan Deere destroyed seven more enemy fighters and one bomber during the Battle of Britian and was awarded a Bar to the DFC. In January 1941 became an Operations Room Controller. He returned to operations on 7th May 1941, joining 602 Squadron in Scotland as a Flight Commander.

On August 1st 1941 Alan Deere took command of 602 Squadron and on that day destroyed a Bf109. When his second operational tour ended in January 1942 Deere went to the USA to lecture on fighter tactics. In May 1942, he took command of 403 Squadron, commanding the squadron until August before being posted to staff duties. During a temporary attachment to 611 Squadron in February 1943 Deere destroyed an Fw190. Some days later he was appointed Wing Leader at Biggin Hill. He flew 121 sorties during his six months leadership and by this time his tally was twenty-two confirmed victories, ten probables and eighteen damaged.

He was also awarded the DSO and a bar to his DFC. Alan Deere was also awarded the Croix de Guerre and the DFC (USA) and in May 1945 He was awarded an OBE. In December 1977 Air Commodore Deere retired form the Royal Air Force. Iin 1959 Air Commodore Alan Deere wrote of his experiences in his book, ’Nine Lives’. Sadly, he passed away on 21st September 1995.




Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC
21 / 9 / 1995Ace : 7.00 Victories
Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, flying Hurricanes throughout the Battle of Britain with much success. 54(F) Sqn Spitfire 1942-1944 in Australia. Flew some missions in aircraft R4118, which saw a total of 49 combat missions, shooting down several enemy aircarft. It was in this aircraft that Bob Foster damaged two Ju88s and shared in the destruction of a third. He finished the war with 7 confirmed victories and 3 probables.




Wing Commander Steve Griggs AFC
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Wing Commander Steve Griggs AFC

Steve Griggs has flown the Jaguar since 1976 with 31, 54(F) and 41(F) squadrons. In 1982 he ejected twice within a five-month period; the first after being shot down over Germany by an AIM-9 Sidewinder missile fired inadvertently from an RAF F-4 Phantom; the Second after a catastrophic engine fire over Northeast Scotland. He was awarded the Air Force Cross for pioneering night low level flying in the Jaguar With night vision goggles and was at the time of signing the print, the Officer Commanding 41(F) Squadron.



Air Commodore James Leathart
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1998Died : 1998
Air Commodore James Leathart

After flight training, he joined No.54 Squadron flying Gauntlets. He became the commanding officer of No.54 Squadron as they re-equipped with Spitfire MkIs. In a remarkable event, he was awarded the DSO when he rescued the stranded CO of No.74 Sqn. Commandeering a Miles Master training aircraft, he flew to France escorted by other pilots from No.54 Sqn, and rescued the CO before returning across the Channel. It was for this action that he was awarded the DSO in June 1940. Died in 1998.



Citation for the DSO
During May, 1940, this officer led his squadron on a large number of offensive patrols over- Northern France. On one occasion an attack was made on a formation of no less than 60 enemy aircraft. In company with his squadron he has shot down fifteen Messerschmitts, and possibly one Heinkel in and one Junkers 88, during the period mentioned. He also flew a trainer aircraft to Calais Marck aerodrome to rescue a squadron commander who had been shot down there but was uninjured. Whilst taking off, after the rescue, an attack was made by twelve Messerschmitt 109s but with great coolness and skilful evasive tactics Flight Lieutenant Leathart succeeded in shaking off the enemy and landing again without damage. Subsequently, he took off and flew back to England unescorted. This officer has displayed great courage, determination and splendid leadership.

Flight Lieutenant Ludvik Martel
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25 / 4 / 2010Died : 25 / 4 / 2010
Flight Lieutenant Ludvik Martel

Ludwik Alfred Martel was born in 1919 in Piotrkow in central Poland. Yearning to fly, Martel took a gliding course and in 1937, having compled education in a state technical school in Lodz, enlisted in the Polish Air Force. Martel was a cadet pilot when Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939. aftre a brave resistance the personnel of the Polish Air Forcel were ordered to make for neutral Romania. Martel escaped from the Romanian internment on September 29, and Martel travelled to France via the Balkans. There the Polish Armed Forces were being re-formed under General Sikorski. Posted to Britain, Martel was assigned to 54 Squadron Martel arrived in England in early 1940 and was commissioned in the RAF in May and transferred to the PAF on August 6. He joined 54 Squadron on August 10, 1940, during the height of the Battle of Britain. Shortly afterwards on the 28th October Martel was transferred to 603 Squadron, based at Hornchurch, flying Spitfires. He claimed a Bf 109 destroyed over the English Channel on 5 October. and a few days later he was forced down by an Me109, suffering shrapnel wounds. He was posted to the Polish 317 (City of Wilno) Squadron on 19 March 1941. He was rested on 28 January 1942, going to 58 OTU, as an instructor, before returning to 317 Squadron on 25 August. On 13 March he was posted with other Polish pilots to form the Polish Fighting Team, otherwise known as Skalskis Circus. They operated in the Western Desert from 17 March to 12 May and destroyed 30 enemy aircraft. He damaged a FW 190 on 4 April and destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged a Mc 200 on the 20th. He returned to 317 Squadron on 22 July 1943. He was posted to 16 FTS, Newton on 20 August but went back to 317 Squadron on 4 November, as a Flight Commander. Tour-expired, he was posted to HQ PAF on 12 September 1944.. Martel was released from service as a flight lieutenant. For a time he flew crop-spraying aircraft in East Africa and then in London he ran a successful property maintenance business. He was a prominent member and trustee of the Polish Air Force Association, looking after the welfare of its veterans and promoting fellowship with the Royal Air Force Association. Martel was decorated with the Virtuti Militari (5th Class) and with the Polish Cross of Valour. Sadly, we have learned that Ludvik Martel passed away on 25th April 2010



Group Captain Bobby Oxspring
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8 / 8 / 1989Died : 8 / 8 / 1989
Group Captain Bobby Oxspring

Robert Wardlow Oxspring was born in Sheffield on 22nd May 1919, the son of a World War 1 decorated pilot of the same name. He joined the RAF in March 1938 on a short service commission and joined 66 Sqn in the December and started operational flying in July 1940, flying throughout the Battle of Britain. His Spitfire X4170 was shot down by Bf109s over Kent on 25th October, baling out with slight injuries (Caterpillar Club Badge). He was awarded the DFC on 8th November. September 1942 saw him awarded a bar to the DFC. Moving to Mediterranean combat, it is thought probable that Oxspring was the pilot who shot down renowned German ace Anton Haffner of JG51 on 2 January 1943. Oxspring led his squadron to be the highest scoring in the North African theatre, and survived his second shooting down of the war, Oxspring was awarded a second bar to his DFC in February 1943. During the war Squadron Leader Oxspring had registered 13 solo kills with 2 shared, 2 probable kills and 4 solo V-1 Flying Bombs destroys and 1 shared. In 1946 he was awarded the Dutch Vligerkruis by Royal Decree of the 31st October 1946 appearing in the London Gazette on 10th January 1947. He was awarded an AFC in January 1949 after leading a team of 54 Sqn Vampires to Canada and the USA, the first jet aircraft to cross the Atlantic. He retired from the service with the rank of Group Captain, having been Station Commander of RAF Gatow, Germany, in 1968 and settled in Lincolnshire near to RAF Cranwell. He died on 8th August 1989.


Citation for the Distinguished Flying Cross :

One day in September, 1940, Flight Lieutenant Oxspring was engaged on an offensive patrol with his squadron. Whilst acting as rear guard, he sighted and engaged several Messerschmitt 109's 3,000 feet above. After driving them off, he led his section in an attack against a large formation of enemy bombers and succeeded in destroying a Dornier 17 at short range and also in damaging two Heinkels III's. He has at all times led his section with skill and determination, and has destroyed six enemy aircraft.


Citation for the Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross :

This squadron commander has rendered much valuable service. His skill, whether in attacks on the enemy's ground targets and shipping or in air combat, has been of a high order. He has destroyed at least 7 enemy aircraft.


Citation for the 2nd Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross :

During initial operations from forward airfields in North Africa Squadron Leader Oxspring led his formation on many sorties. He destroyed 1 enemy aircraft, bringing his total victories to 8. His outstanding devotion to duty and fine fighting qualities have been worthy of high praise.


Squadron Leader Stuart Nigel Rose
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader Stuart Nigel Rose
Squadron Leader Stuart Nigel Rose

Originally from Elswick in the north east of England, Rose moved south to join the RAFVR in March 1939, called up at the outbreak of war he was commissioned in June 1940 joining No.602 Sqn in June 1940 flying Spitfires and serving with the unit throughout the Battle of Britain, claiming three victories. Squadron Leader Nigel Rose was then posted to 54 Sqn at Hornchurch in September 1941 before becoming an instructor in 1942, and also serving in the Middle East. Afterwards he moved to No.54 Sqn before taking on positions in training units.



Wing Commander Mike Seares MBE
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Wing Commander Mike Seares MBE

8 / 2005Died : 8 / 2005
Wing Commander Mike Seares MBE

Mike Seares joined the RAF in 1984 and graduated from flying training with HRH Prince Feisal in 1988 and joined 54(F) Sqn. He flew Jaguars during the 1991 Gulf War before becoming a QWI and flight commander on 6Sqn. He achieved 3,000 hours on the type during the squadron's diamond-nine flypast at the Families' Day. One of the youngest squadron commanders in the RAF, he assumed command of 6 Sqn at RAF Coltishall in 2002. He was promoted to Headquarters Strike Command at High Wycombe, Bucks, before being made Group Captain in November 2004. Sadly, Mike Seares died in August 2005.




Wing Commander George W Swanwick
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Wing Commander George W Swanwick

4 / 1 / 2011Died : 4 / 1 / 2011
Wing Commander George W Swanwick

George Swanwick was born on 10th November 1915 and was an air-gunner on Wallaces and Hinds with 504 squadron at RAF Hucknall during the 1930s. In May 1936, 504 became part of the Auxiliary Air Force, and in October 1938 converted to a fighter unit, equipped with Gauntlets. In 1938 George re-trained as a pilot, and was promoted to Sergeant Pilot in August 1939. In May 1940 George Swanwick joined 7 BGS, and on 7th September was posted to 54 Squadron at Catterick flying Spitfires. He then went to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch. Commissioned in late 1941, he was posted to 222 Squadron at North Weald in April 1942 as a Flight Commander. In July George Swanwick joined 603 Squadron in Malta and in September 1942, George was posted to 7 OTU at Port Sudan as Flight Commander. In July 1943, he joined 81 Squadron in Malta as a supernumerary. George was invalided back to the UK and following his discharge from hospital in 1944, George held various staff appointments until the end of the war. George Swanwick was granted a Permament Commission in 1949 and retired on 30th April 1970, as a Wing Commander. Sadly, George Swanwick passed away on 4th January 2011.



Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM

5 / 11 / 2007Died : 5 / 11 / 2007
Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, Officer Commanding 54(F) Sqn Vampire 1948-1949. Eric William Wright was born on September 21st 1919 at Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, and went to the Cambridge County School and the Technical College. Wright joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve in June 1939 and was called up when he had completed his training as a pilot. As a sergeant pilot Wright flew Hurricanes over south-east England during the Battle of Britain; Wright joined No 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron in July 1940, a few days before it left its Scottish base for Croydon. He saw a great deal of action during the summer of 1940, and in the early days of September he shared in the destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighter and a Dornier 17 bomber. On September 15, the climax of the Battle, and a day commemorated as Battle of Britain Day, Wright shot down a Dornier 17 over Maidstone and by the end of the year he had accounted for six enemy aircraft, probably destroyed three more and damaged a further six. At the end of November he was awarded an immediate DFM. Wright was made a flight commander of No.232 Squadron in 1941 and went to India. After the Japanese attacks on Malaya the squadron embarked on the aircraft carrier Indomitable, flying off to Java at the end of January 1942 en route to reinforce the beleaguered squadrons at Singapore. Within a week Wright's CO had been killed and Wright was promoted to squadron leader. He damaged a Japanese bomber off the west coast of Singapore, but 232 was soon forced to evacuate to Sumatra. Wright was made CO of a composite squadron made up of the remaining Hurricanes. They were hopelessly outnumbered, and losses mounted. With only a few aircraft left, on March 1st 1942 Wright was ordered to pass his remaining Hurricanes to a group selected to stay behind and take his remaining pilots to Tjilatjap, on the south coast, from where they were to board a boat for Australia. Two Ford V8s were commandeered, and the party drove through the jungle at night, only to find that the last boat had been sunk. In vain they searched along the coast for other craft. A few days later the island fell to the Japanese, and Wright and his pilots were captured and spent more than three years in Japanese prison camps. After the war Wright was repatriated back to the UK via Guam and the US finally returning to England onboard the liner Queen Mary. Wright resumed his career as a fighter pilot flying the early jets and was a member of the RAFs official aerobatic team, No.247 Squadron, flying Vampires. In April 1948 he flew one of the six single-engine Vampire F3s of No.54 Squadron which made the first Atlantic crossing by jet aircraft. On returning back the the UK, Wright was appointed to command No 54. After spending a year at the Central Fighter Establishment Wright was appointed wing leader at Linton-on-Ouse with command of three fighter squadrons. In late 1956 he converted to the Hunter and took the Tangmere Wing to Cyprus for the Suez operations. He was then given command of the RAFs first Bloodhound ground-to-air missile squadron. In 1960 he was promoted to group captain and spent three years at Headquarters Fighter Command, where he was heavily involved in the introduction into service of the supersonic Lightning fighter. Wright was appointed CBE in 1964. He also received a Kings Commendation for Valuable Services in the Air and the Air Efficiency Award. Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM retired form the Royal Air Force in 1973. Sadly Air Commodore Ricky Wright passed away on the 5th of November 2007 aged 88.


Battle of Britain Pilots for this Squadron
NameInfo
Sgt. H. A. AitkenBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
F/O J. L. AllenBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed July 24th 1940
P/O W. ArmstrongBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Died of wounds February 18th 1943
P/O H. N. D. BaileyBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
P/O S. BakerBritish, Served with : 600, 54 & 66 Squadrons
Missing February 11th 1941**
P/O G. H. BatchelorBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed July 9th 1941
Sgt. A. BlackBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed February 1st 1944
Sgt. J. S. BucknoleBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Missing July 24th 1941**
Sgt. A. A. BurtenshawBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed March 12th 1941
P/O G. D. CalderheadBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed January 12th 1942
P/O A. R. McL. CampbellCanadian, Served with : 54 Squadron
F/O E. F. J. CharlesCanadian, Served with : 54 Squadron
P/O C. ColebrookBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Missing April 21st 1941**
P/O E. J. ColemanBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed February 7th 1941
Sgt. G. R. CollettBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed August 22nd 1940
P/O G. W. CouzensBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Sgt. J. DavisBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
F/O A. L. Deere

Signed Artwork

WW2 Ace - 22.00 victories
New Zealand, Served with : 54 Squadron
Passed away 1st September 1995

Top scoring New Zealand Ace with 22 victories, Deere was born in Auckland on December 12th 1917. Alan Deere would become one of the RAFs finest pilots. Joining the RAF in 1937, in September 1938 Al Deere was posted to No.54 Sqn at the time flying Gloster Gladiators, then in early 1940 the Squadron converted to Spitfires. His first brush with death happened when his oxygen failed while at altitude and ke blacked out, coming to only in time to pull his aircraft out of a dive and certain death. At the beginning of May 1940 Deere took part in the intensive air war over Dunkirk and on 23rd May 1940 Deere took part in a daring rescue operation. He and Pilot Officer Allen escorted their flight commander, James Leathart, to France where he was to land a Miles Master trainer and pick up the CO of 74 Squadron who had made a forced landing on the airfield at Calais-Marck. While the pick up was made, Alan Deere was at low level with Pilot Officer Allen at 8000 feet. As Flight Commander James Leathart prepared for take off in the Master, Pilot Offcier Allen spotted a flight o Bf109s coming their way.

Deere scored his first victory, as a strafing Bf109 pulled out of its dive, presenting a perfect target. Deere fired a short burst and the aircraft stalled and then crashed into the sea. Deere, climbing to help Allen, crossed the path of two 109’s, one of which turned towards him. Deere also turned, firing at the second one, which rolled over and dived away. Pursuing the first one, he caught up at treetop height and pursued him, firing off his remaining ammunition before the German headed for home. During the whole event Deere and Allen accoutned for three Bf109s shot down and three damaged. All three aircraft returned to their base at RAF Hornchurch.

During four days - 23rd to 29th May - Deere shot down three Bf109’s and three Bf110’s but his luck ran out and he was shot down over Dunkirk while attacking a Dornier Do17 and luckily managed a forced landing in Belgium where he optained a bicycle and cycled to Dunkirk where he managed to get on a destroyer and returned to Hornchurch within 30 hours of taking off. In June he was decorated with the DFC by the King at a special ceremony at Hornchurch. Alan Deere destroyed seven more enemy fighters and one bomber during the Battle of Britian and was awarded a Bar to the DFC. In January 1941 became an Operations Room Controller. He returned to operations on 7th May 1941, joining 602 Squadron in Scotland as a Flight Commander.

On August 1st 1941 Alan Deere took command of 602 Squadron and on that day destroyed a Bf109. When his second operational tour ended in January 1942 Deere went to the USA to lecture on fighter tactics. In May 1942, he took command of 403 Squadron, commanding the squadron until August before being posted to staff duties. During a temporary attachment to 611 Squadron in February 1943 Deere destroyed an Fw190. Some days later he was appointed Wing Leader at Biggin Hill. He flew 121 sorties during his six months leadership and by this time his tally was twenty-two confirmed victories, ten probables and eighteen damaged.

He was also awarded the DSO and a bar to his DFC. Alan Deere was also awarded the Croix de Guerre and the DFC (USA) and in May 1945 He was awarded an OBE. In December 1977 Air Commodore Deere retired form the Royal Air Force. Iin 1959 Air Commodore Alan Deere wrote of his experiences in his book, ’Nine Lives’. Sadly, he passed away on 21st September 1995.
P/O P. G. DexterBritish, Served with : 603 & 54 Squadron
Killed July 14th 1941
F/Lt F. P. R. DunworthBritish, Served with : 66 & 54 Squadrons
P/O E. F. EdsallBritish, Served with : 54 & 222 Squadrons
Died of wounds April 12th 1942
S/Ldr. D. O. FinlayBritish, Served with : 41 & 54 Squadrons
Passed away 19th April 1970.
P/O A. FinnieBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed July 25th 1940
Sgt. A. GavanBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed 22nd June 1967
Sgt. D. G. GibbinsBritish, Served with : 54 & 222 Squadrons
Sgt. J. N. GlendinningBritish, Served with : 54 & 74 Squadrons
Killed March 12th 1941
F/O C. W. GoldsmithSouth African, Served with : 603 and 54 Squadrons
Died October 28th 1940
Fl/Lt. W. E. DFC GoreBritish, Served with : 607 & 54 Squadrons
Missing September 28th 1940**
F/O C. F. GrayNew Zealand, Served with : 54 Squadron
F/Lt. D. G. DFC GribbleBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Missing June 4th 1941**
F/O J. S. HartCanadian, Served with : 602 and 54 Squadron
Sgt. L. W. HarveyBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
P/O W. P. HopkinBritish, Served with : 54 & 602 Squadron
P/O J. HowardBritish, Served with : 54 & 74 Squadrons
Killed May 6th 1941
P/O P. HowesBritish, Served with : 54 & 603 Squadrons
Killed September 18th 1940
P/O J. L. KempBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Sgt W. KlozinskiPolish, Served with : 54 Squadron
P/O W. KrepskiPolish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Missing September 7th 1940
Sgt. N. A. LawrenceBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Passed away 22nd August 1958.
S/Ldr. J. A. DSO Leathart

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 54 Squadron
Passed away 1998.

After flight training, he joined No.54 Squadron flying Gauntlets. He became the commanding officer of No.54 Squadron as they re-equipped with Spitfire MkIs. In a remarkable event, he was awarded the DSO when he rescued the stranded CO of No.74 Sqn. Commandeering a Miles Master training aircraft, he flew to France escorted by other pilots from No.54 Sqn, and rescued the CO before returning across the Channel. It was for this action that he was awarded the DSO in June 1940. Died in 1998.
Sgt. J. C. LockwoodBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed March 3rd 1941
P/O L. Martel

Signed Artwork
Polish, Served with : 54 and 603 Squadrons
Passed away 25th April 2010.

Ludwik Alfred Martel was born in 1919 in Piotrkow in central Poland. Yearning to fly, Martel took a gliding course and in 1937, having compled education in a state technical school in Lodz, enlisted in the Polish Air Force. Martel was a cadet pilot when Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939. aftre a brave resistance the personnel of the Polish Air Forcel were ordered to make for neutral Romania. Martel escaped from the Romanian internment on September 29, and Martel travelled to France via the Balkans. There the Polish Armed Forces were being re-formed under General Sikorski. Posted to Britain, Martel was assigned to 54 Squadron Martel arrived in England in early 1940 and was commissioned in the RAF in May and transferred to the PAF on August 6. He joined 54 Squadron on August 10, 1940, during the height of the Battle of Britain. Shortly afterwards on the 28th October Martel was transferred to 603 Squadron, based at Hornchurch, flying Spitfires. He claimed a Bf 109 destroyed over the English Channel on 5 October. and a few days later he was forced down by an Me109, suffering shrapnel wounds. He was posted to the Polish 317 (City of Wilno) Squadron on 19 March 1941. He was rested on 28 January 1942, going to 58 OTU, as an instructor, before returning to 317 Squadron on 25 August. On 13 March he was posted with other Polish pilots to form the Polish Fighting Team, otherwise known as Skalskis Circus. They operated in the Western Desert from 17 March to 12 May and destroyed 30 enemy aircraft. He damaged a FW 190 on 4 April and destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged a Mc 200 on the 20th. He returned to 317 Squadron on 22 July 1943. He was posted to 16 FTS, Newton on 20 August but went back to 317 Squadron on 4 November, as a Flight Commander. Tour-expired, he was posted to HQ PAF on 12 September 1944.. Martel was released from service as a flight lieutenant. For a time he flew crop-spraying aircraft in East Africa and then in London he ran a successful property maintenance business. He was a prominent member and trustee of the Polish Air Force Association, looking after the welfare of its veterans and promoting fellowship with the Royal Air Force Association. Martel was decorated with the Virtuti Militari (5th Class) and with the Polish Cross of Valour. Sadly, we have learned that Ludvik Martel passed away on 25th April 2010
F/O H. K. F. MatthewsBritish, Served with : 54 & 603 Squadrons
Killed October 7th 1940
F/O D. A. P. DFC Mcmullen

WW2 Ace - 19.00 victories
British, Served with : 54 & 222 Squadrons
Passed away 1st July 1985.

S/Ldr. S. T. MearesBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed November 15th 1941
P/O P. R. MildrenBritish, Served with : 54 & 66 Squadrons
Killed February 11th 1941
Sgt. N. MorrisonBritish, Served with : 54, 72 & 74 Squadrons
Killed February 24th 1941
Sgt. W. J. NobleBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Passed away 1979.
Sgt. J. K. NorwellBritish, Served with : 54 & 41 Squadrons
Sgt R. B. PriceBritish, Served with : 54, 245, 73 & 222 Squadrons
Killed November 15th 1941**
Sgt. R. H. RobbinsBritish, Served with : 54 & 66 Squadrons
Sgt. B. L. RobertsonBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed February 12th 1942**
F/O D. J. SandersBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed September 7th 1940
F/O D. SecretanBritish, Served with : 54 & 72 Squadron
P/O M. M. ShandBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Passed away 22nd December 2007.
Sgt. D. J. SteadmanBritish, Served with : 54 & 245 Squadrons
P/O C. StewartNew Zealand, Served with : 54 and 222 Squadrons
Killed March 15th 1941
Sgt. G. W. Swanwick

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 54 Squadron
Passed away 4th January 2011

George Swanwick was born on 10th November 1915 and was an air-gunner on Wallaces and Hinds with 504 squadron at RAF Hucknall during the 1930s. In May 1936, 504 became part of the Auxiliary Air Force, and in October 1938 converted to a fighter unit, equipped with Gauntlets. In 1938 George re-trained as a pilot, and was promoted to Sergeant Pilot in August 1939. In May 1940 George Swanwick joined 7 BGS, and on 7th September was posted to 54 Squadron at Catterick flying Spitfires. He then went to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch. Commissioned in late 1941, he was posted to 222 Squadron at North Weald in April 1942 as a Flight Commander. In July George Swanwick joined 603 Squadron in Malta and in September 1942, George was posted to 7 OTU at Port Sudan as Flight Commander. In July 1943, he joined 81 Squadron in Malta as a supernumerary. George was invalided back to the UK and following his discharge from hospital in 1944, George held various staff appointments until the end of the war. George Swanwick was granted a Permament Commission in 1949 and retired on 30th April 1970, as a Wing Commander. Sadly, George Swanwick passed away on 4th January 2011.
Sgt L. SwitonPolish, Served with : 54 and 303 Squadrons
F/Sgt. P. H. TewBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Passed away 1984.
F/O D. R. Turley-GeorgeBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
F/O B. H. WayBritish, Served with : 54 Squadron
Killed July 25th 1940

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

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 In the early evening of the 18th of July 1941, following coastguard reports of an enemy aircraft in their vicinity, two Hurricanes of 87 Sqn  on detachment at the Airfield at St Mary's, Scilly Isles were scrambled  to an area some 30 miles south west of the Scilly Isles where they intercepted a lone Heinkel He111.  Alex Thom was the first to attack, his windscreen being sprayed with oil as his rounds tore into the Heinkel's starboard engine.  Breaking away, his wingman F/O Roscoe now took over the chase, but the German bomber was already mortally wounded and was observed to alight onto the sea where upon the crew immediately took to their life raft as the Heinkel began to sink beneath the waves just minutes later, Thom circled overhead until he saw the motor launch arrive to pick up the German aircrew before returning back to St Mary's.

An Early Bath by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £65.00
 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.

Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
DHM924P.  Jaguar Flight Test On by Geoff Lea.

Jaguar Flight Test On by Geoff Lea (P)
Half Price! - £1300.00
 In one of the finest portrayals of the Avro Lancaster, Moonlight Run depicts the aircraft of Fl. Lt. Mickey Martin (ED909 AJ-P) at the moment of release of the Wallace Bomb during the Dams raid on the Ruhr in 1943. With only the gentlest of moonlight rippling over the dark water of the Mohne, this dramatic picture plays homage to the impossible low altitudes and high speeds that were necessary to complete successfully their heroic mission. A stark and refreshing treatment of a subject at the hearts of all aviation historians.

Moonlight Run (Dambusters) by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

 An Avro Anson comes under attack from an Me109.

Avro Anson by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £52.50
 A sad, but magnificent sight on 24th October 2003 as the last three British Airways Concordes bring commercial supersonic travel to a close, as they taxi together to their final dispersal at Heathrow.

Concorde Farewell by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
A surprise dive bombing attack at 12.45pm as Spitfires of 65 squadron were taking off. 148 bombs were dropped on the airfield and hangars. The entire squadron got airborne with one exception, its engine was stopped by the blast from one of the bombs.

Battle of Britain, Manston, 12th August 1940 by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £125.00
 On the morning of 21st April 1917, coastal airship No C.17 was on a routine patrol captained by Sub Lieutenant  E G O Jackson, when sometime around 8.00am, she was attacked by German seaplanes and shot down. Such was their vulnerability that these huge battlebags were an easy target for marauding enemy scouts, their single Lewis guns achieving little by way of defence. The Hansa Brandenburg W.12, on the other hand, was a nimble and useful aircraft that the Germans put to good use in the coastal defence role.

Hansa Brandenburg W.12 – Attack on the C.17 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2000.00

NAVAL PRINTS

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 Admiral Cuthbert Collingwoods flagship the Royal Sovereign comes under intense fire from the black-painted Spanish 3-decker, Santa Ana, and the French 74 Fougueux, just prior to breaking through the Franco-Spanish line at Trafalgar.
HMS Royal Sovereign by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £625.00
Depicting Titanic with the sun going down for the last time.

Titanic by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £35.00
The pride of the British fleet, The Mighty Hood as she was known, was launched in 1918.  Weighing in at over 40,000 tons she was 860 feet long and had eight 15 inch guns, at her launch she was more than a match for any adversary.  Hood sailed the world in the inter-war years and was admired in every foreign port she visited, however with a lack of major refits in this time the second world war found the Hood unprepared for a major battle,  On the 24th of May 1941 the German battleship Bismarck found Hoods achilles heel within only a few salvos, namely her inadequate deck armour.  Hood exploded in a huge fireball from which only three sailors survived.  Here HMS Hood is seen with Force H in the Mediterranean.  Winston Churchill knew that the powerful French fleet at Mers-el-Kebir could fall into German hands at any time and that the threat had to be removed by any means.  On the 3rd of July 1940 the French fleet was duly dispatched by Force H.  The Strasbourg being the only French battleship able to make her escape.  Hodd is depicted opening fire at 17.55 hours with the battleships Resolution and the destroyer HMS Foxhound to her stern.

HMS Hood - Operation Catapult by Anthony Saunders (P)
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 The pilot of a Fairey Swordfish MKII guides his aircraft towards the landing ramp of HMS Victorious following a sortie in the Mediterranean Sea 1940

Safe Return by Ivan Berryman.
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 Spearheading the Falklands Task Force as it heads south in 1982, the carrier HMS Hermes is shown in company with two Type 21 frigates, HMS Arrow on the left and HMS Ardent in the near foreground. In the far distance, HMS Glamorgan glints in the sun as Type 42 HMS Sheffield cuts across behind Hermes. All pennant numbers were painted out and a vertical black identification stripe applied to all the Type 42s to distinguish them from their Argentine counterparts.

Falklands Task Force by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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The cruiser HMS Frobisher dominates this scene off Houlgate at the Normandy landings of 1944.  The monitor HMS Roberts lies beyond Frobisher with a Large Infantry Landing Ship or LSI (L) unshipping its LCAs on the extreme right of the picture.  In the foreground, a motor launch attends a group of LCP (L)s as they head for the French beaches.  Two Spitfire Mk.IXs conduct sweeps overhead as Operation Neptune gathers momentum.

HMS Frobisher and HMS Roberts at Normandy by Ivan Berryman (P)
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B103.  HMS Royal Sovereign and HMS Warspite departing Malta by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Royal Sovereign and HMS Warspite departing Malta by Ivan Berryman
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 The Leander class cruiser HMS Orion is shown departing Grand Harbour Malta late in 1945.

HMS Orion by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

Lance-Corporal Harry Nichols, 3rd battalion Grenadier Guards, winning the Victoria Cross at the River Escaut, 21st May 1940 by David Rowlands. (Y)
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 Although in the process of regrouping after their escape from the Cherkassy Pocket, Panthers and Panzer Grenadiers of the crack 5th SS Panzer Division Wiking are part of the relief force hastily assembled and thrown in to free the strategically important city of Kowel in the Pripet Marshes. By April 10th the Soviet encirclement of the city was broken and Wiking were pulled out of the line to continue refitting.

Fight for Kowel, Poland, March/April 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £95.00
  Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe.  No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Sturmtigers of Sturmmorser Company 1002, commanded by Lieutenant Zippel, take on ammunition in preparation for the battle to come. These fearsome monsters 38cm rocket projectors could penetrate up to 2.5m of reinforced concrete. Luckily for the Allies only 18 were completed by the wars end.

Preparing for the Day, the Reichswald, February 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00

 Churchill MkIV tank of the 6th Guards Tank Brigade (comprised of 4th Battalion Grenadier Guards, 4th Battalion Coldstream Guards and 3rd Battalion Scots Guards), pass infantry of the 2nd Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders during the Battle for Caumont.

Operation Bluecoat, normandy, 30th July 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
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 1st Battalion in action at Escaut Canal, Belgium, May 1940. The last Highland Regiment to wear a kilt in battle, attacking the Germans at the River Escaut.  From the Diary of Captain R. Leah, 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders : Tuesday 21st May : Bn left Ere about 2 a.m. to march back. Fortunately Coy Cmdr. were required for some sort of recce and we went in C.O.s car.  Arrived Taintignies 3 a.m. and self went out again with Wilkie in C.O.s car to look for for C Coy which had gone astray, and to see Q.M. about Bn rations in Wez-Velvain.  Could not find either.  Met the Battalion arriving from Ere when I left the village at 3 a.m.  Got back myself at 4 a.m. found empty house which I entered by window and slept well for 5 hours. Officers mess going in house beside M.T. park, and had good breakfast.  Fairly quiet morning and orders to move this afternoon to Bn assembly position S of Wez-Velvain.  Thence we were directed to Merlin and prepared for counter-attack to drive enemy off Western side of Escaut.

The Queens Own Cameron Highlanders by David Rowlands (C)
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 Kharkov, Russia, February - March 1943.  After abandoning Rostov and Kharkov in the face of the Soviet Winter Offensive, Field Marshal Erich von Manstein set about the recapture of both.  Among those taking part in the ensuing counterattack was the newly promoted tank gunner Erich Barkmann, of 2nd Company 2nd SS Panzer Grenadier Division, who had just been given command of his own Panzer III.

The Long Road to Kharkov by David Pentland. (P)
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 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. After the failed Operation Lüttich (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 ) The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons.

Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (Y)
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