Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Featured Artists
One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com
Military and aviation arist David Pentland.  His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Military and aviation arist David Pentland. His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
HALF PRICE PRINTS AND OTHER SPECIAL OFFERS!
Aircraft
Index
Squadron
Index
Aviation Art
by Country
Aviation
Signatures Index
Aviation
Artists Index
Aviation
Art Offers
Product Search        

JG132

Founded : 1st April 1936
Country : Germany
Fate : Became Stab./JG26 on 1st May 1939.

'Richthofen'

Formed 1st April 1936 in Döberitz. Until 1st November 1938, JG132 carried the traditional name Richthofen. On 1st November 1938 redesignated Stab/JG131. Reformed 1st November 1938 in Düsseldorf. On 1st May 1939 redesignated Stab/JG26. From 1st April 1936, the squadron flew He51s and Bf109s (B and D) from Döberitz. From 1st November 1938 to 1st May 1939 the squadron flew Bf109 (D and E) from Düsseldorf.

JG132

Aces for : JG132
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Heinz Lange70.00The signature of Heinz Lange features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Herbert Wehnelt36.00The signature of Herbert Wehnelt features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Wolfgang Schenck18.00The signature of Wolfgang Schenck features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Eduard Neumann13.00The signature of Eduard Neumann features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Wolfgang Falck8.00The signature of Wolfgang Falck features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Aircraft for : JG132
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by JG132. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

He51

Click the name above to see prints featuring He51 aircraft.

Manufacturer : Heinkel
Production Began : 1933
Number Built : 746

He51

The Heinkel He51 was a development from the He49 whicc was designed by Walter and Siegfried Gunter for Heinkel. This was their first aircraft designed for Heinkel and the first prototype flew in November 1932. The He49 although designed as an advanced trainer soon became a fighter. The Fist He51 was produced in secret for the Luftwaffe and the first prototype flew in May 1933 with the aircraft reaching the Luftwaffe in July. The He 51 was a conventional single-bay biplane, with all-metal construction and fabric covering. The He51 was powered by a BMW VI engine, with an armament of two 7.92 mm (.312 in) machine guns mounted above the engine. On 6 August 1936, six of the He51s were sent to Spain and fought during the Spanish Civil War The He51 gained some initial success when faced against the older biplanes of the opposition. The successes were two Nieuport Ni-52, a Potez 54 and a Breguet 19. All of these successes came on the first day of operations for the He51 on 18 August 1936. But soon the arrival of modern Russian aircraft made it impossible for the He51 to be effective so they were used for night duties and even in this role they did not do well. The He51 was therefore withdrawn from fighter duty and relegated to the ground-attack role by both the Legion Kondor and the Spanish Nationalists. When the He51 came into servcie it was soon evident that it was going be be obsolete very quickly. A total of 150 He51 were built, followed by 450 of the modified He51B and 46 of the floatplane version, the He51B-2, and a ground attack version He51C, of which a total of 100 were built.

Me109



Click the name above to see prints featuring Me109 aircraft.

Manufacturer : Messerschmitt
Production Began : 1937
Retired : 1945
Number Built : 33984

Me109

Willy Messerschmitt designed the BF109 during the early 1930s. The Bf109 was one of the first all metal monocoque construction fighters with a closed canopy and retractable undercarriage. The engine of the Me109 was a V12 aero engine which was liquid-cooled. The Bf109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War and flew to the end of World War II, during which time it was the backbone of the Luftwaffe fighter squadrons. During the Battle of Britian the Bf109 was used in the role of an escort fighter, a role for which it was not designed for, and it was also used as a fighter bomber. During the last days of May 1940 Robert Stanford-Tuck, the RAF ace, got the chance to fly an Me109 which they had rebuilt after it had crash landed. Stanford-Tuck found out that the Me109 was a wonderful little plane, it was slightly faster than the Spitfire, but lacked the Spitfire manoeuvrability. By testing the Me109, Tuck could put himself inside the Me109 when fighting them, knowing its weak and strong points. With the introduction of the improved Bf109F in the spring of 1941, the type again proved to be an effective fighter during the invasion of Yugoslavia and during the Battle of Crete and the invasion of Russia and it was used during the Siege of the Mediteranean island of Malta. The Bf109 was the main fighter for the Luftwaffe until 1942 when the Fw190 entered service and shared this position, and was partially replaced in Western Europe, but the Me109 continued to serve on the Eastern Front and during the defence of the Reich against the allied bombers. It was also used to good effect in the Mediterranean and North Africa in support of The Africa Korps. The Me109 was also supplied to several German allies, including Finland, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, and Slovakia. The Bf109 scored more kills than any other fighter of any country during the war and was built in greater numbers with a total of over 31,000 aircraft being built. The Bf109 was flown by the three top German aces of the war war. Erich Hartmann with 352 victories, Gerhard Barkhorn with 301 victories and Gunther Rall with 275 kills. Bf109 pilots were credited with the destruction of 100 or more enemy aircraft. Thirteen Luftwaffe Aces scored more than 200 kills. Altogether this group of pilots were credited with a total of nearly 15,000 kills, of which the Messerschmitt Bf109 was credited with over 10,000 of these victories. The Bf109 was the most produced warplane during World War II, with 30,573 examples built during the war, and the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 units produced up to April 1945. Bf109s remained in foreign service for many years after World War II. The Swiss used their Bf109Gs well into the 1950s. The Finnish Air Force did not retire their Bf109Gs until March 1954. Romania used its Bf109s until 1955. The Spanish Hispanos flew even longer. Some were still in service in the late 1960s.

Me110

Click the name above to see prints featuring Me110 aircraft.

Manufacturer : Messerschmitt
Production Began : 1938

Me110

The Bf-110 grew out of Herman Gorings specifications for a multipurpose aircraft capable of penetrating deep into enemy airspace to clear the sky of enemy fighters in advance of German bomber formations. The aircraft would also be utilized as a long range interceptor, and as a ground support and ground attack bomber. The Bf-110 prototype first flew in 1936. The prototype was under powered with its Daimier Benz DB 600A engines. Several months passed before a go ahead was given for large scale production which commenced in 1938. Utilizing improved DB 601 engines, the early production 110s were as fast as any single engine fighter at that time, and had superior fire power. Their biggest apparent weakness was in the areas of armor protection for the crew, and in terms of maneuverability when compared to single seat fighters. The 110 was produced in large numbers and in many different variants. The 110D was the long range model. An additional belly tank was fitted to that aircraft, with several later variants having the more traditional drop tanks. The first serious test for the Bf-110 came during the Battle of Britain. About 300 Bf-110s were involved. They became easy prey for Hurricane and Spitfire pilots, and Bf-109s were often required to assist the 110s in their own defense. On August 15, 1940, which became known as Black Tuesday, the Bf-110s were ravaged by the RAF, and for the month over 100 aircraft were lost. On the Eastern Front the Bf-110 performed admirably in the early stages of Operation Barbarossa. With the Soviet Air Force weakened in the first several weeks of the attack, 110s were effectively utilized in a ground attack role. Ultimately, the Luftwaffe re-equipped a significant number of its 110s as night fighters. The aircraft performed well in this role because it was a good gun platform with sufficient speed to overtake the RAF night bombers. Such night missions were typically carried out with no Allied fighter escort, so the 110 night fighters would not have to engage or elude Allied fighters in this role.
Signatures for : JG132
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo


Oberst Wolfgang Falck
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Oberst Wolfgang Falck

13 / 3 / 2007Died : 13 / 3 / 2007
13 / 3 / 2007Ace : 8.00 Victories
Oberst Wolfgang Falck

At the outbreak of war Wolfgang Falck was Staffelkapitan of 8,/JG132 flying the Bf110 Zerstorer in the Polish Campaign. In Feb 1940 he became Kommandeur 1./ZG1 and led it during the Western campaign. From June 1940 Falck was appointed Kommodore NJG1, the largest Geschwader in the Luftwaffe. During this time the greatest Luftwaffe night Aces were under his command. In July 1943 he joined the staff of Luftflotte Recih where he was responsible for the day and night fighter defence of the Reich. In the autumn of 1944 he was made Fighter Leader in the Balkans, and later became head of staff for flying training. Wolfgang Falck flew 90 operations and was awarded the Knight's Cross. Died 13th March 2007.

Wolfgang Falck with his wife - photograph taken c.2007 at his home in Austria.




Major Heinz Lange
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Major Heinz Lange

26 / 2 / 2006Died : 26 / 2 / 2006
26 / 2 / 2006Ace : 70.00 Victories
Major Heinz Lange

At the outbreak of war Heinz Lange was with I./JG21 scoring his first victory in October 1939. He flew 76 missions in the Battle of Britain with 8./JG54, and never lost a wingman. After flying in the Balkan campaign he took part in the invasion of Russia, scoring 7 victories during the first week. In October 1941 he was given command of 1./JG54 and in 1942 command of 3./JG51. In January 1944 Heinz Lange returned to JG54 to command 1.Gruppe and then back to JG51 where he was appointed Kommodore of JG51 Molders, leading IV./JG51 at the same time. Heinz Lange flew over 628 missions and achieved 70 victories. He was awarded the Knight's Cross. Born 2nd October 1917, died 26th February 2006.

Heinz Lange signing the print - Fighter General - by Graeme Lothian

Heinz Lange with a model of his favourite aircraft.




Oberst Eduard Neumann
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Oberst Eduard Neumann

9 / 8 / 2004Died : 9 / 8 / 2004
9 / 8 / 2004Ace : 13.00 Victories
Oberst Eduard Neumann

A veteran of the Spanish Campaign, Edward Neumann, at the start of the war, was leading 4./JG26 in France, later promoted Adjutant of I./JG27. He took part in the Balkan Campaign before moving in 1941 to North Africa, where I./JG27 was the only German fighter unit for the first nine months. In 1942 he became Kommodore of JG27, a position which he held throughout the remainder of the Desert Campaign. He was credited with moulding the careers of many outstanding pilots, the best known being the young Hauptmann Marseille. Following the defeat of Rommel's Afrika Korps at El Alamein JG27 covered their retreat back to Tunisia. When his wing left the desert, 'Edu' Neumann was transferred to the Staff of General of the Fighter Arm, where he remained until 1944. Promoted to Oberst in the autumn of that year, he took over as Fighter Commander of Northern Italy. Edu Neumann ended the war as one of the Luftwaffe's most highly respected Commanders. Died 9th August 2004.

Eduard Neumann - photo taken during the war.

Eduard Neumann - photo taken c.2001 at a print signing event.



Major Wolfgang Schenck
Click the name above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Major Wolfgang Schenck

5 / 3 / 2010Died : 5 / 3 / 2010
5 / 3 / 2010Ace : 18.00 Victories
Major Wolfgang Schenck

Born 7th February 1913, Wolfgang Schenck joined the Luftwaffe in 1936. After training he was assigned to JG132 flying Me109s before the squadron was renamed ZG1 and converted to Me110s. He took part in operations against Poland, Norway and France but was hospitalised for three months after being wounded. After recovering, he joined EG210, an experimental squadron, to develop fighter bomber tactics. Renamed as SG210, the squadron later took part in the advance into Russia, where Schenck was awarded his Knights Cross. In March 1942 Schenck took command of 1./ZG1, and was awarded the Oak Leaves to his Knights Cross with this unit. He went on to command SG2, flying Fw190s in the Mediterranean. Later, from December 1944 to January 1945, Schenck commanded KG51, flying the newly developed Me262 jet fighter-bomber. Flying over 400 missions, Schenck scored 18 aerial victories and sunk 28,000 tons of shipping. Wolfgang Schenck passed away on 5th March 2010.



General Herbert Wehnelt
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by General Herbert Wehnelt
5 / 3 / 2010Ace : 36.00 Victories
General Herbert Wehnelt

Joining the Luftwaffe in 1936, Herbert Wehnelt served first with 2./JG132 Richthofen. During the Battle of Britain he flew with III./JG51 and served in the West until transferring to the Eastern Front in 1943. In 1944 he was with JG West and in 1945, JG106. He was awarded the Iron Cross and scored 36 victories.


About our Signatures on Artwork

 

Return to Home Page

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Me109s of I/JG2, under the command of the brilliant Helmut Wick, setting out on a mission across the English Channel in September 1940. Wick, seen in the foreground, with Gunther Seeger off his starboard wing, was the top-scoring Luftwaffe Ace in the Battle of Britain with 56 victories. <br><br><b>Published 2000.</b>

Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
 Albatros DV piloted by Austro-Hungarian Ace Lt. Josef Kiss, Austrian Alps in December 1917.

Christmas Kiss - Albatros DV by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £24.00
 Even the most faithful of Messerschmitt Me 109 pilots that also flew the Focke-Wulf Fw190 grudgingly admitted the well-proportioned and aesthetically pleasing Fw190 was the finest single-seat fighter in the Luftwaffes armoury during World War II. Soon after its arrival on the Channel Front in 1941, when initial bugs were ironed out, this superb fighter came close to fighter design perfection by the standards of the day. Just as the Mk IX Spitfire held the mantle as Britains most outstanding combat fighter of the war, so was the Fw190 regarded by experienced Luftwaffe pilots. Within months of its operational debut the Fw190 was causing widespread consternation among RAF pilots, the new fighter equal to the Mk IX Spitfire in all but its ability in the tightest of turning circles. By 1944 the technically superb Fw190 came into its own in the great air battles against the USAAFs massed daylight raids. The defence of the Reichs western airspace rested on the shoulders of a few Jagdgschwarden who, against steadily increasing odds, were tasked with interception and destruction of the attacking American heavy bombers. Flying alongside the two established Channel fighter wings JG2 Richthofen and JG26 Schlageter, equipped with Fw190s and led by the great fighter ace Oberst Walter Oesau, JG1 joined the battle in defence of northern Germany. Nicolas Trudgians painting Storm Chasers depicts the Fw190As of I./JG1, distinguished by their distinctive black and white striped cowls, scrambling from the snow-covered Dortmund airfield on 10 February 1944 to intercept another inbound American daylight raid. Nicks dramatic view of this technically supreme fighter conveys its true class as it hurtles over the airfield, its undercarriage retracting as the Fw190 accelerates into the climb. Below, sharing the airfield with I./JGI, are the Fw190s of the newly formed Sturmstaffel 1, identified by their black-white-black tail bands, seen taxiing out to join in the interception. Despite bad weather conditions the Luftwaffes defending fighters scored heavily that day, inflicting severe losses on the Americans, claiming 29 bombers and 8 fighters shot down in the action.

Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £110.00
 Soldiers aboard a Merlin helicopter over Helmand Province, Afghanistan, 2010.

Soldiers Over Helmand by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - £1000.00

Flight Lieutenant Mick Martin readies his crew to release their bouncing bomb as he makes his run into the Mohne Dam.  Flanking him is the Lancaster of Wing Commander Guy Gibson, using his aircraft to draw flak from the gunners along the dam.

Into Attack by Gerald Coulson.
Half Price! - £90.00
 Squadron Leader H C Sawyer is depicted here flying his 65 Sqn Spitfire Mk.1a R6799 (YT-D) in the skies above Kent on 31st July 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. Chasing him is Major Hans Trubenbach of 1 Gruppe, Lehrgeschwader 2 in his Messerschmitt Vf109E-3 (Red 12) . The encounter lasted eight minutes with both pilots surviving.

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (F)
Half Price! - £90.00
 Flying Officer Eric Loveland and his navigator Sergeant Jack Duffy of No.68 Squadron intercept a German Ju88 intruder on the night of March 17th 1945.

Moonlight Serenade by Troy White.
Half Price! - £70.00
 P51D of Colonel Glenn Duncan C.O. of the 353rd Fighter Group, along with Betty-E flown by Lt. Colonel Wayne Blickenstaff, taking off on one of their last missions of the war, April 1945.

Dove of Peace by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Spearheading the Falklands Task Force as it heads south in 1982, the carrier HMS Hermes is shown in company with two Type 21 frigates, HMS Arrow on the left and HMS Ardent in the near foreground. In the far distance, HMS Glamorgan glints in the sun as Type 42 HMS Sheffield cuts across behind Hermes. All pennant numbers were painted out and a vertical black identification stripe applied to all the Type 42s to distinguish them from their Argentine counterparts.

Falklands Task Force by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
 It is September 18th, 1805, off Plymouth. Led by the 74-gun HMS Thunderer, with HMS Ajax astern, HMS Victory, with Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson aboard, begins her journey south to join the rest of the British fleet off Cadiz where the combined French and Spanish fleets lay blockaded. This was the prelude to the Battle of Trafalgar and the last time Nelson would see his beloved England.

Hearts of Oak Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £325.00
One of the most decisive battles in the history of the Royal Navy, Nelsons defeat of the French fleet took place on 21st October 1805 off Cape Trafalgar and was conducted with not a single British ship lost, although few ships escaped severe punishment and loss of life on both sides was tragically high

The Battle of Trafalgar, 21st October 1805 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £85.00
 HMS Illustrious slips quietly away from the docks at Devonport, Plymouth with the Fiji class cruiser in the middle distance, 1941.

HMS Illustrious and HMS Kenya at Devonport by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00

 Known as the Silent Service, the men of the United States Submarine Force were the unsung heroes of the US Navy.  In World War Two, Submarine Force alone was responsible for sinking over fifty percent of Japanese Shipping - but the success came at a high price - one in five submarines did not survive the war.  Here USS Wahoo, arguably the most famous US Submarine of the war, is seen surveying a kill during her fifth war patrol in 1943.  USS Wahoo (SS-238)  would also fall victim, sunk by Japanese aircraft and Japanese submarine chasers 15 and 43 in Soya Strait, Japan on the 11th of October 1943.

Night of the Hunter, USS Wahoo by Anthony Saunders. (P)
Half Price! - £2600.00
DHM120.  The Battle of Trafalgar by W Stuart.

The Battle of Trafalgar by William Stuart.
Half Price! - £25.00
HMS Ark Royal after a recent refit, rejoins the fleet in 2001.

HMS Ark Royal by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
HMS Glowworm, burning severely after receiving hits from the mighty Admiral Hipper, is depicted turning to begin her heroic sacrifice off the Norwegian coast on 8th April 1940. Hugely out-gunned and already crippled, Glowworms captain, Lieutenant-Commander Roope rammed his destroyer into the side of the Admiral Hipper, inflicting a 40 metre rip in its armour belt before drifting away and exploding. 38 British sailors were rescued from the sea and Roope was awarded a posthumous VC for his bravery, the first earned by the Royal Navy in WWII.

The attack on the Admiral Hipper by HMS Glowworm by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Oberfeldwebel Albert Kerscher, commander of 2nd company 511 Heavy Tank Battalion aided by a Panzer IV, two Hetzers, a Kingtiger and a Pak gun, successfully defended against concerted Soviet air and armoured attacks, his action buying valuable time for the evacuation of German wounded from Pilau and scoring his 100th victory in the process.

Kerschers Defence of Neuhauser Forest by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £120.00
 Having made contact the previous evening with troops of 4th Infantry Division pushing inland from Utah Beach, paratroopers of the 101st Airborne division The Screaming Eagles help mop up the pockets of German resistance in their general advance towards Carentan.

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Kursk, Central Russia, 1st July 1943.  Sdkfz 232 heavy armoured car and Sdkfz 247 light armoured car of the Reconnaissance battalion, 11th Panzer Division, scouting enemy dispositions prior to the Kursk offensive.

Scouting Ahead by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Bastogne, Ardennes, Belgium, 20th December 1944.  Newly arrived 81mm Mortars of 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division, fire in support of U.S. Paratroopers defending against German probes to the north of Bastogne.

Fire for Effect by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00

 Hauptsturm fuhrer Fritz Klingenberg, and the men of 2nd SS Divisions Motorcycle Reconnaissance battalion stop at the swollen banks of the River Danube. The following day he and six men, a broken down radio, and totally unsupported were to capture the Yugoslavian capital of Belgrade.

The Magician, Balkans, 11th April 1941 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
 Juno Beach, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  Sdkfz 232 armoured cars of 12th SS Reconnaissance Battalion commanded by  Obersturmfuhrer Peter Hansmann observe the Canadian beachhead at Juno Beach.  His small team was tasked with finding out if an invasion was actually underway and it drove some 80km, arriving at the coast near Tracy at 7.30 in the morning to witness the landings in progress.

D-Day Recce by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 The Germans launched their attack on the Kursk salient on 5th July 1943, and for both sides this was maximum effort. The Soviets, however, informed by intelligence of the impending German attack, had ample time to prepare huge defensive works with hundreds of planned anti tank belts.  They deployed 10 Tank Corps, 5 Tank Armies, 1 mechanised Corps and 14 Field Armies equipped with 4000 anti tank guns and 6000 tanks.  The Soviet Air Forces were equally impressive - 2600 aircraft.  The Germans, outnumbered in every department, were forced to scrape together whatever serviceable tanks they could from their badly under strength Panzer formations.  Most of the tanks deployed were old Panzer IIIs or IVs, with only 147 Tigers available for action.  The northern German attack made very little headway, but, in the south, the Germans had grouped all of the SS Panzer forces into the II SS Panzer Corps and these units, despite the enormous Soviet forces ranged against them, began to smash their way through the Soviet defences.  The Luftwaffe too had brought together 1200 aircraft and these made an immediate impact on the fighting - on the first day alone German fighters broke up massive formations of Soviet aircraft, over 400 victories being claimed.

Kursk - Clash of Steel by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £130.00
 The men of the US 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment ambushed the German 1st Battalion, 6th Fallschrimjager Regiment making their way to Carentan, the Battle of Hells Corner ensued.

Hells Corner, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: