Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

 
Featured Artists
Military and aviation arist David Pentland.  His entire range of German armour and other military forces are available at great discounted prices direct from The Military Art Company Ivan Berryman is recognised as one of the leading aviation and naval artists, his entire range of prints published by Cranston Fine Arts are available direct from us, including many original aviation paintings.
David Pentland
Ivan Berryman


One of the greatest aviation artists of all time, Robert Taylor, his entire back catalogue aviaton art prints are available direct from military art.com Nicolas Trudgian.  His last remaining aviation art prints from his back catalogue published by Military Gallery and bought over in 2007 by Cranston Fine Arts are available only direct from our websites.  See Nicolas Trudgian's full range here.
Robert Taylor
Nicolas Trudgian

 
Aircraft
Index
Squadron
Index
Aviation Art
by Country
Aviation
Signatures Index
Aviation
Artists Index
Aviation
Art Offers
Product Search        

No.145 Sqn RAF

Founded : 15th May 1918
Country : UK
Fate : Disbanded 15th October 1957
Known Aircraft Codes : SO, ZX

Polish

Diu noctoque pugnamus - We fight by day and night

No.145 Sqn RAF

Aces for : No.145 Sqn RAF
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Neville F Duke28.00The signature of Neville F Duke features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Adrian Hope Boyd18.00
Roy Gilbert Dutton15.00
Albert Ulrich Houle10.00The signature of Albert Ulrich Houle features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Aircraft for : No.145 Sqn RAF
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by No.145 Sqn RAF. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Hurricane



Click the name above to see prints featuring Hurricane aircraft.

Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1936
Number Built : 14533

Hurricane

Royal Air Force Fighter, the Hawker Hurricane had a top speed of 320mph, at 18,200 feet and 340mph at 17,500, ceiling of 34,200 and a range of 935 miles. The Hurricane was armed with eight fixed wing mounted .303 browning machine guns in the Mark I and twelve .303 browning's in the MKIIB in the Hurricane MKIIC it had four 20mm cannon. All time classic fighter the Hurricane was designed in 1933-1934, the first prototype flew in June 1936 and a contract for 600 for the Royal Air Force was placed. The first production model flew ion the 12th October 1937 and 111 squadron of the Royal Air Force received the first Hurricanes in January 1938. By the outbreak of World war two the Royal Air Force had 18 operational squadrons of Hurricanes. During the Battle of Britain a total of 1715 Hurricanes took part, (which was more than the rest of the aircraft of the Royal air force put together) and almost 75% of the Victories during the Battle of Britain went to hurricane pilots. The Hawker Hurricane was used in all theatres during World war two, and in many roles. in total 14,533 Hurricanes were built.

Spitfire



Click the name above to see prints featuring Spitfire aircraft.

Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.
Signatures for : No.145 Sqn RAF
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo


Wing Commander Peter V Ayerst DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Wing Commander Peter V Ayerst DFC
Wing Commander Peter V Ayerst DFC

Peter Ayerst joined the RAF in 1938, and was posted to 73 Squadron in August 1939, flying Hurricanes. He went to France with the squadron, scoring his first victory in April 1940. After a spell instructing, when he shared in the destruction of a He111 with two other instructors, he had postings with both 145 and 243 Squadrons. In July 1942 he went to 33 Squadron, before promotion to flight commander with 238 Squadron, both postings with further combat success. After a period in South Africa, he returned to the UK, joining 124 Squadron flying Spitfire MkVIIs in defence of the invasion ports, where he scored his final victory; then flew Spitfire MkIXs on bomber escorts to Germany. He later became a Spitfire test pilot at Castle Bromwich. Peter finished the war not only a brilliant fighter Ace, but also one of the most highly regarded wartime instructors in the RAF. His final victory tally stood at 5 destroyed, 1 probable, 3 damaged and 2 further destroyed on the ground.




Squadron Leader Neville Duke, DSO, OBE, DFC*, AFC, CzMC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Squadron Leader Neville Duke, DSO, OBE, DFC*, AFC, CzMC

7 / 4 / 2007Died : 7 / 4 / 2007
7 / 4 / 2007Ace : 28.00 Victories
Squadron Leader Neville Duke, DSO, OBE, DFC*, AFC, CzMC

Neville Duke flew Spitfires as wingman to Sailor Malan in 92 Squadron. In November 1941 he was posted to 112 Squadron in the Middle East. After a second tour in the Desert, he flew a third tour, with 145 Squadron in Italy. He was the top scoring Allied Ace in the Mediterranean with 28 victories. After the war, in 1953, he captured the World Air Speed record. He died 7th April 2007.

Neville Duke signing artwork of Graeme Lothian.



Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC

27 / 12 / 2008Died : 27 / 12 / 2008
Wing Commander Peter Dunning-White DFC

Joining 601 Squadron in 1938, Peter Dunning-White was called up to full-time service in August 1939, being posted to 29 Squadron in May 1940, then a few weeks later to 145 Squadron at Westhampnett, flying Hurricanes. He was soon in action over the Channel, sharing in the destruction of an HeIll on 18 July. Transferring to 615 Squadron in March 1941, on 15 April his victory over an Me109 confirmed him as an Ace. In 1942 he was attached to 409 Squadron RCAF, and then to 255 Squadron on Beaufighters. He went to North West Africa with this squadron, being made Flight Commander in March 1943. In July 1944 he was posted to 100 Group, Bomber Command. Sadly, he died on 27th December 2008.



Group Captain Albert Houle DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Group Captain Albert Houle DFC

1 / 6 / 2008Died : 1 / 6 / 2008
1 / 6 / 2008Ace : 10.00 Victories
Group Captain Albert Houle DFC

Flying Officer and Group Captain Albert Shorty’Ulrich Houle Jr. Born in Massey on March 24, 1914, Albert Houle went to the University of Toronto with a Bsc (science) in 1936. In 1936 he won the Canadian intercollegiate wrestling championship . After the outbreak of World War Two Albert Houle in September 1940 enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force at North Bay and received his flying wings is Saskatchewan. Along with other Canadian Pilots he joined 213 Squadron at Nicosia, Cyprus in September 1941 and remained with 213 Squadron until 1942. It was during this period that Flying Officer Albert Houle destroyed three enemy aircraft, damaged three others, and also had one probable and one shared. He was awarded the DFC on November 27, 1942. Not only did Group Captain Albert Houle fly with 213 Squadron but also 145 and 417 Squadrons, and his score of enemy aircraft was 11 destroyed, one probable and seven others damaged. Houle and his Spitfire became a legend during and after the war. He was the most successful of the many Canadian pilots who flew with the squadron during the war. His citation for his DFC reads : One evening in October, 1942, Flying Officer Houle was flying with his squadron on patrol over El Alamein when a formation of enemy dive-bombers was sighted. The enemy aircraft jettisoned their bombs and flew west in an attempt to avoid the combat. With great tenacity and determination Flying Officer Houle pursued them far over the enemies lines and in the rapidly failing light engaged and destroyed at least two of the hostile bombers, Group Captain Albert Shorty Ulrich Houle died June 1st 2008 and is buried in Ottawa Canada.



Wing Commander Robert G Middlemiss DFC CD
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Wing Commander Robert G Middlemiss DFC CD
Wing Commander Robert G Middlemiss DFC CD

Bob was born in Montreal in 1920 and was educated at Commercial High School of Montreal. After graduating from high school Bob Middlemiss accepted a track scholarship from an American College but war broke out and he volunteered to join the RCAF. He was told when an opening was available he would be called. In the interim, his Dad's Regiment, of which he was the RQSM, the 17th Duke of York's Royal Canadian Hussars was mobilized as the 3rd Canadian Motorcycle Regiment. Bob decided to join as a trooper but was called by the Air Force and a few months later joined the RCAF on September 14, 1940. He received his flying training at 13 EFTS, St. Eugene, ON and 9 SFTS, Summerside, PEI where he received his wings. He was posted overseas and trained on Spitfires at 57 OTU, Hawarden, Cheshire. He was posted to 145 Squadron and then later to 41 Squadron. They carried out operations consisting of air defence patrols against high level and low level fighter bomber attacks, convoy patrols in the English Channel, fighter sweeps, bomber escort and low level rhubarbs. In June 1942, he was selected to serve with a team of Spitfire pilots posted to Malta. They were taken to within 700 miles of Malta on the aircraft carrier HMS Eagle and then launched to hopefully make the island. During his tour with 249 Squadron on Malta Bob shot down and destroyed three enemy aircraft and damaged two others before he was shot down and wounded. After recuperating, he served as an Instructor at 52 OTU and then 53 OTU in England. From the OTU he was posted to 403 Squadron, part of the 127 Wing commanded by Johnnie Johnson, the highest scoring ace of WWII. Bob had the honour of flying as his number 2 on a number of sorties. After completing two tours of operations he returned to Canada and instructed on Hurricanes and Mosquitos.

Colonel Middlemiss was decorated for his war effort with the Distinguished Flying Cross the citation read as follows:
This officer completed two tours of operational duty and has completed sorties from Malta and the United Kingdom. He has destroyed three enemy aircraft and damaged others. His standard of leadership as a section leader and flight commander has always been high and he has invariably shown outstanding courage.

Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC

27 / 8 / 2003Died : 27 / 8 / 2003
Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC

Born 28th of June 1920, Peter Parrott joined the RAF in 1938, completing his fighter pilot training before joining No.607 Sqn in early 1940. On the 10th of May 1940, he destroyed two He111s and damaged a further two, sharing in another the next day. He was then posted to No.145 Sqn, damaging a Bf110 on May the 22nd and an He111 four days later, an action which saw his aircraft sufficiently damaged to force him to crash land in Kent. During the Battle of Britain, Peter Parrott destroyed a Me109, Ju87, Ju88 and damaged an He111, before being posted to No.605 Sqn in September. After baling out of his damaged Hurricane in December 1940 and remaining with 605 Sqn until summer 1941, he became an instructor. From July 1943 he joined a number of Squadrons in Italy, returning to Britain after the war to become a test pilot. He died 27th August 2003.




Group Captain John Peel DFC DSO
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Group Captain John Peel DFC DSO

7 / 1 / 2004Died : 7 / 1 / 2004
Group Captain John Peel DFC DSO

Born 17th October 1911. John Peel is credited with having fired the first shots of the Battle of Britain. In July 1940, he commanded No.145 Sqn destroying one and sharing in the destruction of three German bombers. During the battle of Britain, he damaged or destroyed three enemy aircraft, and was himself shot down, crash landing on the Isle of Wight. After the Battle of Britain he served as a Wing Leader, once more being shot down - this time over the Channel, until in January 1943 he took a job in the Air Ministry, where he served until the end of the war. He died 7th January 2004.




Flight Lieutenant James Pickering AFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant James Pickering AFC
Flight Lieutenant James Pickering AFC

Jim Pickering joined the RAFVR in 1937, and was attached to 769 Sqn FAA, then 804 Sqn FAA. In June 1940 he returned to the RAF and flew Spitfires with 64 Sqn during the Battle of Britain. With 418 Flight Jim flew Hurricanes to Malta from HMS Argus on 2nd August 1940. This flight was to reinforce Maltas handful of outdated Gladiators and few surviving Hurricanes, and on 16th August was amalgamated to become 261 Squadron. With this unit Jim flew Hurricanes and at least five operations in the legendary Gladiators, which have been immortalised as Faith, Hope, and Charity. In April 1941 Jim was posted, first to Egypt, then 80 Squadron in October 1942, and 145 Squadron in December. He returned to the UK in 1943. Born in 1915 in Hinckley, Leicestershire, England, James Pickering studied the printing business in Europe during the 1930s. Convinced that Hitler represented a threat which could lead to war, Pickering joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in 1937. As a week-end flyer he earned his wings as a Sergeant Pilot in April of 1939. In September of that year Pickerings unit was mobilized. He was sent to an attachment of the Fleet Air Arm, where he flew Gladiators, Skuas, and Rocs, following his carrier training. In June of 1940 Pickering returned to the RAF flying Spitfires with No. 64 Squadron based in Kenley during the Battle of Britain. Pickering was selected along with eleven other carrier-qualified pilots to fly Hurricanes to Malta off the deck of the HMS Argus. On arrival in Malta these new Hurricanes and their pilots were integrated with the 3 flyable Gladiators and 3 Hurricanes already there to form No. 261 Squadron. This unit carried on the defense of Malta against Italian and German bombing missions which were launched regularly from Sicily, only sixty miles distant. Because of his earlier experience with the Gladiator, Pickering flew both Gladiators and Hurricanes at Malta for eight months. It is believed that Pickering is the last living RAF pilot to fly the Gladiator at Malta. Following his assignment in Malta, Pickering joined No. 1 Aircraft Delivery Unit which ferried aircraft from the West African Gold Coast and Port Sudan to various points throughout the war theater of operations. Pickering delivered a P-40 Warhawk to the Flying Tigers which involved one of the first flights over the hump. In October of 1942 Pickering returned to operational flying with No. 80 Squadron (Hurricanes) at EI Alamein, and later with No. 145 Squadron (Spitfires). Having completed three separate operational tours, Pickering returned to England when victory was achieved in North Africa. In England, Pickering was assigned as a test pilot with No. 3501 Servicing Unit. He tested modifications to the Spitfire, and also test flew a number of P-51 Mustangs. Later he was transferred to No. 151 Repair Unit as its Chief Test Pilot. This was the largest unit of this kind in the RAF. Because of these experiences, Pickering is unusual in having flown eighty different types of aircraft during the War. Awarded the Air Force Cross, Pickering was released from the RAF at Wars end. He returned to his family-owned printing business, and spent his working career with the company, from which he retired in 1965. He also served as an outside Director of the largest Building Society in Britain. Pickering joined the Volunteer Reserve once again following the War, and continued to fly with the RAF until reaching the mandatory age limit of sixty. Pickering has had a private pilots license since 1938. He has flown thousands of hours and he is an expert on geological and archaeological research from the air. A Fellow of both the Geological Society and the Society of Antiquaries, Jim Pickering epitomizes the English character of determination and persistence which was so vastly underestimated by Hitler during WW 11.




Flight Lieutenant Larry Robillard DFM CD
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Larry Robillard DFM CD

8 / 3 / 2006Died : 8 / 3 / 2006
Flight Lieutenant Larry Robillard DFM CD

Born in Ottawa, 17 November 1920, Canadian ace with 8 victories. Sgt. Joseph Guillame Laurent Robillard, During a sweep over the Lille area, less than a month after his first operational flight, Sergeant Robillard, a former member of the Ottawa Flying club, saw a fellow pilot parachuting. Believing it was his commanding officer who had been shot down, Robillard started to protect the descending pilot by escorting him down, but was himself attacked by nine enemy fighters. In the fierce fight which followed the daring Ottawan destroyed at least two of his attackers. Flight Leutnant Larry Robillard was one of Johnnie Johnsons keen and skillful Canadian pilots. He was shot down over France in 1943. However, with his fluent French and the help of the Resistance, he managed to get back to England, and received a heros welcome when he returned to France to continue the fight, leading a section of 443 Squadron of Johnnies 144 Wing following the Liberation. He flew with 145 Sqn RAF, 72 Sqn RAF, 402 Sqn RCAF, 443 Sqn RCAF. Larry Robillard died at his home in Montreal, Canada on 8th March 2006.

Larry Robillard signing artist Graeme Lothian's art prints and book, at the Special Forces Club, London, in 2001.



Flight Lieutenant Anthony Russell
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Anthony Russell
Flight Lieutenant Anthony Russell

Anthony Russell joined the Royal Navy in 1938 but was discovered to be under age and discharged. He then joined the RAFVR and was called up to full-time service at the outbreak of war. After completing his training, on 28 September 1940 he was posted as a Sergeant to join 43 Squadron at Tangmere flying Hurricanes. He later flew with 145 Squadron, and was commissioned in April 1942. He remains the last surviving 43 Squadron Battle of Britain pilot to have flown with Tom Dalton-Morgan.



Flight Lieutenant Steve Woods DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Steve Woods DFC
Flight Lieutenant Steve Woods DFC

Having served with 33 Sqn which flew in support of the Army in West Africa, he then transferred to 145 Sqn flying Spitfires in Malta and Italy including a spell as acting Commanding Officer.


Battle of Britain Pilots for this Squadron
NameInfo
P/O J. H. BachmannBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Killed April 9th 1943
Sgt. E. D. BakerBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 8th 1940**
F/Lt. A. H. Boyd

WW2 Ace - 18.00 victories
British, Served with : 145 Squadron


F/O G. R. BranchBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Killed August 11th 1940
Sgt J. BudzinskiPolish, Served with : 605 and 145 Squadrons
F/O R. D. BungeyAustralian, Served with : 145 Squadron
Died 10th June 1943
P/O G. C. T. CarthewCanadian, Served with : 253, 85 and 145 Squadrons
W/C. R. A. ChignellBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Killed February 14th 1942**
P/O B. M. G. De HemptinneBelgian, Served with : 145 Squadron
Killed May 5th 1942
F/O P. W. Dunning-White

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 145 Squadron
Passed away 27th December 2008

Joining 601 Squadron in 1938, Peter Dunning-White was called up to full-time service in August 1939, being posted to 29 Squadron in May 1940, then a few weeks later to 145 Squadron at Westhampnett, flying Hurricanes. He was soon in action over the Channel, sharing in the destruction of an HeIll on 18 July. Transferring to 615 Squadron in March 1941, on 15 April his victory over an Me109 confirmed him as an Ace. In 1942 he was attached to 409 Squadron RCAF, and then to 255 Squadron on Beaufighters. He went to North West Africa with this squadron, being made Flight Commander in March 1943. In July 1944 he was posted to 100 Group, Bomber Command. Sadly, he died on 27th December 2008.
S/Ldr R. G. DFC Dutton

WW2 Ace - 15.00 victories
British, Served with : 145 Squadron


F/O D. N. FordeBritish, Served with : 145 & 605 Squadrons
P/O J. GilPolish, Served with : 43, 229 and 145 Squadrons
Missing December 31st 1942
P/O W. J. GlowackiPolish, Served with : 605 and 145 Squadrons
Killed September 24th 1940
Sgt. J. K. HaireBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Killed November 6th 1940
P/O J. H. HarrisonBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 12th 1940
F/O D. S. G. HonorBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Sgt. W. J. JohnsonBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
P/O A. R. I. G. JottardBelgian, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing October 27th 1940
(F.A.A.) Sub Lt. I. H. KestinBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 1st 1940**
Sgt J. KwiecinskiPolish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 12th 1940
P/O J. MachaeekCzech, Served with : 310 and 145 Squadrons
Killed July 8th 1941
F/Lt. J. A. F. DFC MaclachlanBritish, Served with : 145 & 73 Squadrons
Died as POW July 31st 1943
Sgt. J. McconnellBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
F/O M. A. NewlingBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Killed July 6th 1941**
P/O J. H. M. OffenbergBelgian, Served with : 145 Squadron
Killed January 22nd 1942
P/O A. OstowiczPolish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 11th 1940
F/Lt C. L. PageBritish, Served with : 234 & 145 Squadrons
F/Lt W. PankratzPolish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 12th 1940
F/O P. L. Parrott DFC

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 145 & 605 Squadrons
Passed away 27th August 2003

Born 28th of June 1920, Peter Parrott joined the RAF in 1938, completing his fighter pilot training before joining No.607 Sqn in early 1940. On the 10th of May 1940, he destroyed two He111s and damaged a further two, sharing in another the next day. He was then posted to No.145 Sqn, damaging a Bf110 on May the 22nd and an He111 four days later, an action which saw his aircraft sufficiently damaged to force him to crash land in Kent. During the Battle of Britain, Peter Parrott destroyed a Me109, Ju87, Ju88 and damaged an He111, before being posted to No.605 Sqn in September. After baling out of his damaged Hurricane in December 1940 and remaining with 605 Sqn until summer 1941, he became an instructor. From July 1943 he joined a number of Squadrons in Italy, returning to Britain after the war to become a test pilot. He died 27th August 2003.
S/L J. R. A. DFC Peel

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 145 Squadron
Passed away 7th January 2004

Born 17th October 1911. John Peel is credited with having fired the first shots of the Battle of Britain. In July 1940, he commanded No.145 Sqn destroying one and sharing in the destruction of three German bombers. During the battle of Britain, he damaged or destroyed three enemy aircraft, and was himself shot down, crash landing on the Isle of Wight. After the Battle of Britain he served as a Wing Leader, once more being shot down - this time over the Channel, until in January 1943 he took a job in the Air Ministry, where he served until the end of the war. He died 7th January 2004.
F/O P. W. RaboneNew Zealand, Served with : 145 Squadron
Killed July 24th 1944
F/Lt. W. RileyBritish, Served with : 263, 302 & 145 Squadrons
Killed July 16th 1942**
F/Lt. R. M. B. RowleyBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Sgt W. SasakPolish, Served with : 32 and 145 Squadrons
Killed November 30th 1940
P/O L. A. SearsBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 8th 1940**
F/O Lord R. U. P. Shuttleworth (Kay-Shuttleworth)British, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 8th 1940**
(F.A.A.) Sub Lt. F. A. SmithBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 8th 1940 **
P/O J. E. DFC Storrar

WW2 Ace - 9.00 victories
British, Served with : 145 & 73 Squadrons & 421 Flight


Sgt. D. B. SykesBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
P/O J. M. DFC TalmanBritish, Served with : 213 & 145 Squadrons
Killed July 10th 1944**
Sgt. P. ThorpeBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
F/O W. UrbanowiczPolish, Served with : 145 and 303 Squadrons
Sgt. J. V. WadhamBritish, Served with : 601 & 145 Squadrons
Killed October 12th 1940
P/O E. C. J. DFC WakehamBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing August 8th 1940**
P/O J. L. WardBritish, Served with : 32 & 145 Squadrons
Killed March 20th 1942
Sgt. J. WeberBritish, Served with : 1 & 145 Squadrons
P/O F. WeberCzech, Served with : 145 Squadron
P/O A. N. C. DFC WeirBritish, Served with : 145 Squadron
Missing November 7th 1940**
P/O R. D. YuleNew Zealand, Served with : 145 Squadron

About our Signatures on Artwork

 

Return to Home Page

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

  B-17G 42-37755 NV-A 325th Bomb Squadron, 92nd Bomb Group from Poddington crash landing in Switzerland on 25th February 1944 after sustaining damage over enemy territory after a raid on Augsburg and Stuttgart.

Safe Pastures by Mark Postlethwaite.
Half Price! - £70.00
 On 27th November 1950, thousands of Chinese troops swarmed over the frozen Yalu river on the North Korean /Chinese border, cutting off US Marines in the Chosin Reservoir area. Over the next ten days the marines with air support from both the Navy and Marine Air Wings fought their way out of the trap to Hungnam and safety.

Frozen Chosin, Korea, December 1950 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
 F-4C Phantom II of Colonel Robin Olds of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, January 1967.

Colonel Robin Olds by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £725.00
Magdeburg, Germany, 10th April 1945.  Attacking from behind and above, ObLt.Walter Schuck, Staffelkapitain of 3./JG7, ripped through the massed boxes of 8th Airforce B17s, downing four in a single high speed pass.

Deadly Pass by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £275.00

 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 Depicting a crashed Beau Nightfighter.

Desert Prang by Geoff Lea. (P)
Half Price! - £1300.00
 A Douglas C-47 of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group gets away from the Devon airfield of Upottery on 5th June 1944 carrying paratroops of 101st Airborne Division.  The company departed from Upottery airbase in Devon, England, and dropped over the Cotentin Peninsula of Normandy, France in the early hours of the morning of June 6th, 1944 at the start of the Normandy invasion.

101st Airborne en route to Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
1st June 1940 - <i>Pete</i> Peters fights off an overwhelming attack over Dunkirk and destroys three fighters.  Anson MKV flown by pilot officer Phillip Peters was leading a patrol of three Ansons of No.500 Royal Auxiliary Air Force Squadron over Dunkirk at the time the British Expeditionary Force was evacuating from the beaches.  He was flying at around 50ft when his mid upper gunner reported that nine Bf109s were attacking. Dropping to wave-top height the slow obsolescent twin engined aircraft tried to shake off their pursuers.  Two planes were severely damaged and Peters sent them home, leaving his own aircraft at the mercy of the enemy fighters.  It was at this point that Peters was grateful for his 'secret weapons'.  In addition to the Anson's nose gun and mid upper turret, guns had been fitted projecting out of the sides of the aircraft's long 'greenhouse' cabin. The extra guns were manned by the co-pilot and wireless operator. By throttling back and executing a number of skid turns Peters was able to out manoeuvre the enemy and allow his crew to fire on the attackers.  The first Bf109 was finished off with the nose gun as it did a stall turn in front off the aircraft. The second was shot down into the sea.  A third attacker sustained heavy damage and turned tail with the other pursuers.  Peters set course for Detling.  The news of the battle went on ahead of his arrival and he was greeted by applause and cheering of the squadron personnel.  When the aircraft was inspected, only one bullet hole was found. It wasn't until later when he had his parachute repacked that another armour piercing bullet was found lodged in the silk.  For the attack and morale boosting effect for the rest of the squadron, Peters was awarded the DFC.  The remaining crew, Sergeant Spencer, Corporal Smith, Leading Aircraftsman Dillnutt and Leading Aircraftsman Cunningham all received the Distinguished Flying Medal.

Improbable Victory by Tim Fisher (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 A swordfish from HMS Warspite on patrol off the coast of Egypt, near the port of Alexandria.

Out of Alex by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
At 12.30pm on the 21st of October 1805, Admiral Lord Nelson on board his flagship, HMS Victory, breaks the line of the combined French and Spanish fleets.  The Victory is delivering a devastating stern rake to the 80 gun French ship Bucentaure, the flagship of the combined fleets, commanded by Vice-Admiral P. C. J. B. S. Villeneuve.  Starboard to the Victory is the 74 gun Redoutable.  This ship, the Victory and HMS Temeraire, seen left, became locked together soon after, the unequal exchange resulting in the Redoutable having the highest casualties during the entire battle.

Breaking the Line at the Battle of Trafalgar by Graeme Lothian
Half Price! - £50.00
  Type 42 HMS Southampton (D90), Type 22 Beaver (F93), Type 42 Manchester (D95) and Type 21 Amazon (F169) formate during a World cruise on which they visited 17 countries in 9 months.

Around the World by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £500.00

The nuclear-powered submarine HMS Repulse (S23) manoeuvres in preparation to berth at HMS Dolphin in Portsmouth harbour in the late 1970s.

HMS Dolphin by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 Mitsubishi G4Ms of 27 Kanoya Kokutai begin their devastating attack on Force Z off the north east coast of Malaya on 10th December 1941. Both Repulse and prince of Wales were lost in the attack, while their accompanying destroyers remained to pick up survivors among them HMS Express which can be seen off HMS Repulse starboard quarter.

HMS Repulse with HMS Prince of Wales Under Attack by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £55.00
 The largest and fastest of all the ships that took part in the Battle of Jutland, the elegant battle cruiser HMS Tiger was launched in 1913 and is easily recognisable by the unusual position of Q turret just aft of the third funnel, She is shown about  to pass beneath the Forth Bridge as she departs Rosyth for a sea trial

HMS Tiger by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
 The Japanese ship Takao at Flank speed, riding shotgun for the carrier

Flank Speed by Randall Wilson.
Half Price! - £35.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Goch-Gennep, Germany, 9th February 1945.  The Sturmgeschutz III of Leutnant Heinz Deutsch, Stug-Brigade XII, and paratroops of 7th Fallschirmjager Division counterattacking the Allied advance into the Reichswald forest in the final months of the war.  The small Stug brigade numbering at its peak only 30 assault guns was responsible for the destruction of 250 allied tanks, Deutsch's gun claiming 44 of that total.

Defenders of the Reichswald by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Jagdpanthers of 654 heavy Tank Battalion engage 6th Guards Tank Brigade Churchills.
Debut at Caumont, Normandy, 30th July 1944 by David Pentland. (D)
Half Price! - £70.00
 Near Caen, D-Day, 6th June 1944.  Vickers heavy machinegun team of the British 3rd Division, <i>Monty's Ironsides</i>, in action against the German strong points Morris and Hillman.  The division comprised of the 2nd East Yorkshires, 1st South Lancashires, 1st Suffolks, 2nd Lincolnshires, 1st King's Own Scottish Borderers, 2nd Royal Ulster Rifles, 2nd Warwickshires, 1st Norfolks, and 2nd King's Shropshire Light Infantry.

Morris and Hillman by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Having made contact the previous evening with troops of 4th Infantry Division pushing inland from Utah Beach, paratroopers of the 101st Airborne division The Screaming Eagles help mop up the pockets of German resistance in their general advance towards Carentan.

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £52.50

 A Tiger (P) Ferdinand, 7th Company, 654th Schwere Panzerjager Abteilung passes a knocked out Soviet Su122 on the German advance towards the village of Ponyri.  The fighting around this small agricultural settlement was some of the most savage of the entire battle.

The Battle for Ponyri Station, Kursk, 9th July 1943 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Northern France, 22nd May 1940.  Sdkfz 222 light armoured cars of the SS Leibstandarte Regiment drive along French lanes on a reconnaissance patrol for the forces of General Heinz Guderian on their advance towards the French coast.

Eyes of the Army by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
Lieut. George Cairns of the South Staffordshire Regiment at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma, 13th March 1944, along with the 3rd/6th Gurkha Rifles.
Lieutenant George Cairns VC, at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma 13th March 1944 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £280.00
 Normandy, Mid-June 1944.  A REME Leyland Retriever mobile workshop truck and M7 Priest SP gun of 33rd Field Regiment, Royal Artillery, 3rd Infantry Division, disembark from an LST at one of the <i>Whale</i> floating roadways that made up the British Mulberry B harbour at Arromanches.

Arromanches by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: