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No.605 Sqn RAF

Founded : 5th October 1926
Country : UK
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
Known Aircraft Codes : UP, HE, NR

County of Warwick (Auxiliary)

Nunquam dormio - I never sleep

No.605 Sqn RAF

No.605 Sqn RAF Artwork



Enemy Approaching by David Pentland. (P)

Aces for : No.605 Sqn RAF
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Harbourne M Stephen22.50The signature of Harbourne M Stephen features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Archibald Ashmore Archie McKellar21.00
Christopher Bunny Currant15.00The signature of Christopher Bunny Currant features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Charles Palliser7.50The signature of Charles Palliser features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Bob Foster7.00The signature of Bob Foster features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Aircraft for : No.605 Sqn RAF
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by No.605 Sqn RAF. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Boston

Click the name above to see prints featuring Boston aircraft.


Boston

Full profile not yet available.

Gladiator



Click the name above to see prints featuring Gladiator aircraft.

Manufacturer : Gloster
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1945
Number Built : 746

Gladiator

GLOSTER GLADIATOR: A continuation form the Gloster Gauntlet aircraft the Gloster Gladiator (SS37) becoming designated the F.7/30 was named Gladiator on the 1st July 1935. The first 70 Gladiators had Under wing machine guns (Vickers or Lewis) before the browning became standard The first aircraft arrived at Tangmere airfield on in February 1937 to no. 72 squadron. at the outbreak of world war two a total of 218 Gladiators had been received by the Royal air force with a total of 76 on active service. They served also in the Middle eats and in 1940 when Italy joined the war was nearly the only front line fighter in the middle east. Between 1939 and 1941. the Gloster Gladiator flew in many war zones. flying in France, Greece, Norway, Crete Egypt Malta and Aden. The Aircraft claimed nearly 250 air victories. It stayed in front line duties until 1942, then becoming fighter trainer, and other sundry roles. It continued in these roles until the end of world war two. The Naval equivalent the Sea Gladiator a short service in the Middle east and European waters. A Total of 746 aircraft were built of these 98 were Sea Gladiators.. Performance. speed: 250mph at 17,500 feet, 257 mph at 14,600 Range 430 miles. Armament: Two fixed .3-03 browning machine guns

Hurricane



Click the name above to see prints featuring Hurricane aircraft.

Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1936
Number Built : 14533

Hurricane

Royal Air Force Fighter, the Hawker Hurricane had a top speed of 320mph, at 18,200 feet and 340mph at 17,500, ceiling of 34,200 and a range of 935 miles. The Hurricane was armed with eight fixed wing mounted .303 browning machine guns in the Mark I and twelve .303 browning's in the MKIIB in the Hurricane MKIIC it had four 20mm cannon. All time classic fighter the Hurricane was designed in 1933-1934, the first prototype flew in June 1936 and a contract for 600 for the Royal Air Force was placed. The first production model flew ion the 12th October 1937 and 111 squadron of the Royal Air Force received the first Hurricanes in January 1938. By the outbreak of World war two the Royal Air Force had 18 operational squadrons of Hurricanes. During the Battle of Britain a total of 1715 Hurricanes took part, (which was more than the rest of the aircraft of the Royal air force put together) and almost 75% of the Victories during the Battle of Britain went to hurricane pilots. The Hawker Hurricane was used in all theatres during World war two, and in many roles. in total 14,533 Hurricanes were built.

Meteor

Click the name above to see prints featuring Meteor aircraft.

Manufacturer : Gloster
Production Began : 1944
Number Built : 3947

Meteor

The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' first operational jet. Designed by George Carter, and built by the Gloster Aircraft Company, Armstrong-Whitworth, the Meteor first flew in 1943 and commenced operations on 27 July 1944 with 616 Squadron of the Royal Air Force (RAF). The Gloster Meteor was not an aerodynamically advanced aircraft but the Gloster design team succeeded in producing an effective jet fighter that served the RAF and other air forces for decades. Meteors saw action with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in the Korean War and other air forces used the Meteor. The Royal Danish Air Force, The Belgian Air Force and Isreali Air Force kept the Meteor in service until the early 1970's. A Total of 3947 meteors were built and two Meteors, WL419 and WA638, remain in service with the Martin-Baker company as ejection seat testbeds.

Spitfire



Click the name above to see prints featuring Spitfire aircraft.

Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

Vampire

Click the name above to see prints featuring Vampire aircraft.


Vampire

Full profile not yet available.
Signatures for : No.605 Sqn RAF
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Flight Lieutenant John Cambell
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant John Cambell
Flight Lieutenant John Cambell

John Cambell flew Spitfires with 234 Squadron, before joining 121 Eagle Squadron. After the transfer of the Eagles to the USAAF, John chose to remain with the RAF and was posted to 258 Squadron for the final defence of Singapore, and then to 605 Squadron defending Java. With four victories in the Far East to his credit, in March 1942 the squadron was over-run by the Japanese, and John became a POW in a harsh prison camp in Java for the next 3 and a half years.



Wing Commander Christopher Bunny Currant DSO DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Christopher Bunny Currant DSO DFC

12 / 3 / 2006Died : 12 / 3 / 2006
12 / 3 / 2006Ace : 15.00 Victories
Wing Commander Christopher Bunny Currant DSO DFC

Born 14th December 1911. One of the most succesful fighter pilots in the RAF, credited with 13 kills during the Battle of Britain. On 15th August 1940, with No. 605 Sqn, he downed two He111s and claimed a third probable. On 8th September he downed another bomber and damaged three more, sharing in two more the next day, downing two more and damaging a further three on the 15th of that month, before being shot down himself. The same afternoon, he got airborne again, shooting down a fighter. After the Battle of Britain, he became an instructor, before rejoining combat flying with No.501 Sqn. In August 1942 he took command of No. 122 Wing, leading them until the D-Day landings in June 1944 before taking a non-flying post until the end of the war. He died 12th March 2006.




Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC
12 / 3 / 2006Ace : 7.00 Victories
Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, flying Hurricanes throughout the Battle of Britain with much success. 54(F) Sqn Spitfire 1942-1944 in Australia. Flew some missions in aircraft R4118, which saw a total of 49 combat missions, shooting down several enemy aircarft. It was in this aircraft that Bob Foster damaged two Ju88s and shared in the destruction of a third. He finished the war with 7 confirmed victories and 3 probables.



Flight Lieutenant Charles Palliser DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Flight Lieutenant Charles Palliser DFC

24 / 9 / 2011Died : 24 / 9 / 2011
24 / 9 / 2011Ace : 7.50 Victories
Flight Lieutenant Charles Palliser DFC

Born in West Hartlepool, Charles Palliser was educated at Brougham School and later attended a technical school. Joining the RAFVR at the outbreak of war in 1939, Charles Palliser was posted to No.3 ITW Hasting, moved to No.11 EFTS Perth on 5th December 1939 and in April 1940 went to No.6 FTS at RAF Little Rissington. Palliser converted to Hawker Hurricanes at No.6 OTU at RAF Sutton Bridge in July 1940 and joined No.17 Squadron at RAF Debden on 3rd August 1940 during the Battle of Britain. Palliser moved to RAF Tangmere with No.43 Squadron on 18th August 1940 and then to North Weald with 249 Squadron on 14th September 1940. On the 15th of September he claimed his first aerial victory. In April 1941 Palliser was commissioned and embarked with 249 Sqn on HMS Furious and on 10th May sailed for Gibraltar, and on arrival the squadron transferred to HMS Ark Royal. The squadron flew to Ta' Qali, Malta on 21st May 1941 to take part in the Battle of Malta. During that battle he claimed a further five victories, and on 27th November Palliser flew Gladiator Faith on a met flight. In January 1942 he was posted to 605 Squadron as flight commander. Palliser was awarded the DFC, which was gazetted on 30th January 1942. He left the island in February 1942 as one of the islands longest serving pilots and joined No.25 Air School at Standerton as flight commander, arriving in South Africa to take up the appointment on the 28th March 1942. Palliser was posted to No.62 CFS, Bloemfontein on 17th July, to 2 EFTS Randfontein on 19th October and then to 4 EFTS Benoni on 2nd September 1943. He returned to the UK and in October 1947 Palliser retired from the RAF, at the rank of Flight Lieutenant. Sadly, Charles Palliser died 24th September 2011.



Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC

27 / 8 / 2003Died : 27 / 8 / 2003
Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC

Born 28th of June 1920, Peter Parrott joined the RAF in 1938, completing his fighter pilot training before joining No.607 Sqn in early 1940. On the 10th of May 1940, he destroyed two He111s and damaged a further two, sharing in another the next day. He was then posted to No.145 Sqn, damaging a Bf110 on May the 22nd and an He111 four days later, an action which saw his aircraft sufficiently damaged to force him to crash land in Kent. During the Battle of Britain, Peter Parrott destroyed a Me109, Ju87, Ju88 and damaged an He111, before being posted to No.605 Sqn in September. After baling out of his damaged Hurricane in December 1940 and remaining with 605 Sqn until summer 1941, he became an instructor. From July 1943 he joined a number of Squadrons in Italy, returning to Britain after the war to become a test pilot. He died 27th August 2003.




F/Lt Ray Raby
Click the name above to see prints signed by F/Lt Ray Raby
F/Lt Ray Raby

F/Lt Ray Raby jojned the RAFVR in 1940. His flying training began in the USA, where he was retained as an instructor with both USAF and RAF wings. He qualified on his return for an Air Navigators Certificate. He was posted to 519 Squadron, Wick, on Spitfires prior to joining 542 Squadron, Benson PRU with Jerry Fray as Flight Commander. In 1943, he was posted to Benson and survived 58 operational sorties until he was demobbed in 1946. In 1947 he joined 605 (County of Warwick) Wsquadron, Raux AF, Honiley on Vampire and Meteor jet aircraft as flight commander until disbandment in 1957. His total hours flown are 3265.




Wing Commander Harbourne Stephen CBE, DSO, DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Harbourne Stephen CBE, DSO, DFC

20 / 8 / 2001Died : 20 / 8 / 2001
20 / 8 / 2001Ace : 22.50 Victories
Wing Commander Harbourne Stephen CBE, DSO, DFC

Flying Spitfires with 605 squadron he took part in the air battles over France and Dunkirk and throughout the thick of the Battle of Britain. He was one of the top scoring R.A.F. pilots at the end of 1940 with 22 and a half air victories. In 1942 he was posted to the far east where he took command of 166 wing, remaining in fighters until the end of the war. After the war he had a successful career in newspapers where he became managing Director of the Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph. He died on 20th August 2001.

Harbourne Stephen signing the art prints of Fighting Lady by Graeme Lothian. The original paining Fighter General can be seen in the background.



Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM

5 / 11 / 2007Died : 5 / 11 / 2007
Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, Officer Commanding 54(F) Sqn Vampire 1948-1949. Eric William Wright was born on September 21st 1919 at Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, and went to the Cambridge County School and the Technical College. Wright joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve in June 1939 and was called up when he had completed his training as a pilot. As a sergeant pilot Wright flew Hurricanes over south-east England during the Battle of Britain; Wright joined No 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron in July 1940, a few days before it left its Scottish base for Croydon. He saw a great deal of action during the summer of 1940, and in the early days of September he shared in the destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighter and a Dornier 17 bomber. On September 15, the climax of the Battle, and a day commemorated as Battle of Britain Day, Wright shot down a Dornier 17 over Maidstone and by the end of the year he had accounted for six enemy aircraft, probably destroyed three more and damaged a further six. At the end of November he was awarded an immediate DFM. Wright was made a flight commander of No.232 Squadron in 1941 and went to India. After the Japanese attacks on Malaya the squadron embarked on the aircraft carrier Indomitable, flying off to Java at the end of January 1942 en route to reinforce the beleaguered squadrons at Singapore. Within a week Wright's CO had been killed and Wright was promoted to squadron leader. He damaged a Japanese bomber off the west coast of Singapore, but 232 was soon forced to evacuate to Sumatra. Wright was made CO of a composite squadron made up of the remaining Hurricanes. They were hopelessly outnumbered, and losses mounted. With only a few aircraft left, on March 1st 1942 Wright was ordered to pass his remaining Hurricanes to a group selected to stay behind and take his remaining pilots to Tjilatjap, on the south coast, from where they were to board a boat for Australia. Two Ford V8s were commandeered, and the party drove through the jungle at night, only to find that the last boat had been sunk. In vain they searched along the coast for other craft. A few days later the island fell to the Japanese, and Wright and his pilots were captured and spent more than three years in Japanese prison camps. After the war Wright was repatriated back to the UK via Guam and the US finally returning to England onboard the liner Queen Mary. Wright resumed his career as a fighter pilot flying the early jets and was a member of the RAFs official aerobatic team, No.247 Squadron, flying Vampires. In April 1948 he flew one of the six single-engine Vampire F3s of No.54 Squadron which made the first Atlantic crossing by jet aircraft. On returning back the the UK, Wright was appointed to command No 54. After spending a year at the Central Fighter Establishment Wright was appointed wing leader at Linton-on-Ouse with command of three fighter squadrons. In late 1956 he converted to the Hunter and took the Tangmere Wing to Cyprus for the Suez operations. He was then given command of the RAFs first Bloodhound ground-to-air missile squadron. In 1960 he was promoted to group captain and spent three years at Headquarters Fighter Command, where he was heavily involved in the introduction into service of the supersonic Lightning fighter. Wright was appointed CBE in 1964. He also received a Kings Commendation for Valuable Services in the Air and the Air Efficiency Award. Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM retired form the Royal Air Force in 1973. Sadly Air Commodore Ricky Wright passed away on the 5th of November 2007 aged 88.


Battle of Britain Pilots for this Squadron
NameInfo
Sgt J. BudzinskiPolish, Served with : 605 and 145 Squadrons
S/Ldr. W. M. ChurchillBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed August 27th 1942
F/O T. P. M. Cooper-SlipperBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
F/O P. G. CroftsBritish, Served with : 615 & 605 Squadrons
Killed September 28th 1940
P/O C. F. Currant

Signed Artwork

WW2 Ace - 15.00 victories
British, Served with : 605 Squadron
Passed away 12th March 2006

Born 14th December 1911. One of the most succesful fighter pilots in the RAF, credited with 13 kills during the Battle of Britain. On 15th August 1940, with No. 605 Sqn, he downed two He111s and claimed a third probable. On 8th September he downed another bomber and damaged three more, sharing in two more the next day, downing two more and damaging a further three on the 15th of that month, before being shot down himself. The same afternoon, he got airborne again, shooting down a fighter. After the Battle of Britain, he became an instructor, before rejoining combat flying with No.501 Sqn. In August 1942 he took command of No. 122 Wing, leading them until the D-Day landings in June 1944 before taking a non-flying post until the end of the war. He died 12th March 2006.
S/Ldr. G. R. DFC EdgeBritish, Served with : 253 & 605 Squadrons
P/O C. E. EnglishBritish, Served with : 85 & 605 Squadrons
Killed October 7th 1940
F/O J. FlemingNew Zealand, Served with : 605 Squadron
F/O D. N. FordeBritish, Served with : 145 & 605 Squadrons
P/O G. M. ForresterBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed September 9th 1940 (collided with He111)
P/O R. W. Foster

Signed Artwork

WW2 Ace - 7.00 victories
British, Served with : 605 Squadron


605 Sqn Battle of Britain, flying Hurricanes throughout the Battle of Britain with much success. 54(F) Sqn Spitfire 1942-1944 in Australia. Flew some missions in aircraft R4118, which saw a total of 49 combat missions, shooting down several enemy aircarft. It was in this aircraft that Bob Foster damaged two Ju88s and shared in the destruction of a third. He finished the war with 7 confirmed victories and 3 probables.
Sgt B. FurstCzech, Served with : 310 and 605 Squadrons
P/O W. J. GlowackiPolish, Served with : 605 and 145 Squadrons
Killed September 24th 1940
F/O J. C. F. HayterNew Zealand, Served with : 605 and 615 Squadrons
F/O R. HopeBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed October 14th 1940
Sgt. H. N. DFM Howes

WW2 Ace - 12.00 victories
British, Served with : 85 & 605 Squadrons
Killed December 22nd 1940

P/O J. S. HumphreysNew Zealand, Served with : 605 Squadron
F/Lt. A. Ingle

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 605 Squadron
POW from September 11th 1943. Passed away 31st July 1999

Alec Ingle was commissioned in June 1940 and joined 615 Squadron at Drem flying Hurricanes before moving to Croydon during the Battle of Britain. He probably destroyed a Do17 in September; in October he shot down an Me109 and probably two more, and yet another victory in November, at which time he was appointed B Flight Commander. He later commanded 609 Squadron at Manston before leading 124 Wing in 1943 flying Typhoons. He was shot down in September 1943 after his Typhoon blew up in combat with an Fw190. Badly burned, he spent the remainder of the war as a POW in Stalag Luft III. Alec Ingle was awarded the AFC and DFC. Sadly Alec Ingle died on 31st July 1999.
Sgt K. H. JonesBritish, Served with : 85 & 605 Squadrons
P/O R. E. JonesBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
P/O S. J. MadleBritish, Served with : 615 & 605 Squadrons
Sgt. P. R. C. McintoshBritish, Served with : 151 & 605 Squadrons
Killed October 12th 1940
S/Ldr. A. A. DFC Mckellar

WW2 Ace - 21.00 victories
British, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed November 1st 1940

Born 10th April 1912. Joined No.602 Sqn City of Glasgow flying Spitfires and Hurricanes. Has at least part claim to the first British air victory of the war, and is credited with shooting down the first aircraft to fall on British soil since 1918. In all, he scored 21 victories before being killed when his Hurricane plunged into a field in Kent. He was awarded the DSO and DFC with Bar, the citations for which follow :

Citation for the DFC

This officer has at all times displayed the keenest desire to engage the enemy. In his first large-scale encounter against enemy aircraft he displayed a great sense of leadership and tactics in launching his flight against ninety Heinkel m's. As a result, at least four enemy aircraft were destroyed, of which Flight Lieutenant McKellar destroyed three. He has displayed outstanding leadership and courage.

Citation for the Bar to the DFC

During a period of eight days in the defence of London, Flight Lieutenant McKellar has destroyed eight hostile aircraft, bringing his total to twelve. He displays an excellent fighting spirit, is a particularly brilliant tactician and has led his squadron with skill and resource.

Citation for the DSO

This officer has led his squadron with outstanding courage and determination. He has destroyed 20 enemy aircraft, and his magnificent fighting spirit has proved an excellent inspiration to his fellow pilots.
P/O J. A. MilneCanadian, Served with : 605 Squadron
P/O I. J. DFC MuirheadBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed October 15th 1940
F/O P. L. Parrott DFC

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 145 & 605 Squadrons
Passed away 27th August 2003

Born 28th of June 1920, Peter Parrott joined the RAF in 1938, completing his fighter pilot training before joining No.607 Sqn in early 1940. On the 10th of May 1940, he destroyed two He111s and damaged a further two, sharing in another the next day. He was then posted to No.145 Sqn, damaging a Bf110 on May the 22nd and an He111 four days later, an action which saw his aircraft sufficiently damaged to force him to crash land in Kent. During the Battle of Britain, Peter Parrott destroyed a Me109, Ju87, Ju88 and damaged an He111, before being posted to No.605 Sqn in September. After baling out of his damaged Hurricane in December 1940 and remaining with 605 Sqn until summer 1941, he became an instructor. From July 1943 he joined a number of Squadrons in Italy, returning to Britain after the war to become a test pilot. He died 27th August 2003.
F/O C. W. PassyBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Sgt. D. C. PeacockBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed September 15th 1942
Sgt. H. W. PettitBritish, Served with : 1 & 605 Squadrons
Killed February 2nd 1941**
Sgt R. PudaCzech, Served with : 310 and 605 Squadrons
Sgt. L. F. RallsBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Sgt R. D. RitchieBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed August 9th 1940
P/O J. H. RothwellBritish, Served with : 601, 605 & 32 Squadrons
Killed February 22nd 1941
P/O K. Schadtler-LawBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
S/L D. R. ScottBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed November 8th 1941
P/O A. M. W. ScottBritish, Served with : 3, 607 & 605 Squadrons
Killed January 2nd 1941
Sgt. L. C. SonesBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
P/O P. D. ThompsonBritish, Served with : 32 & 605 Squadrons
P/O E. J. WatsonBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed February 26th 1942**
Sgt. E. W. Wright

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 605 Squadron
Passed away November 5th 2007

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, Officer Commanding 54(F) Sqn Vampire 1948-1949. Eric William Wright was born on September 21st 1919 at Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, and went to the Cambridge County School and the Technical College. Wright joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve in June 1939 and was called up when he had completed his training as a pilot. As a sergeant pilot Wright flew Hurricanes over south-east England during the Battle of Britain; Wright joined No 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron in July 1940, a few days before it left its Scottish base for Croydon. He saw a great deal of action during the summer of 1940, and in the early days of September he shared in the destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighter and a Dornier 17 bomber. On September 15, the climax of the Battle, and a day commemorated as Battle of Britain Day, Wright shot down a Dornier 17 over Maidstone and by the end of the year he had accounted for six enemy aircraft, probably destroyed three more and damaged a further six. At the end of November he was awarded an immediate DFM. Wright was made a flight commander of No.232 Squadron in 1941 and went to India. After the Japanese attacks on Malaya the squadron embarked on the aircraft carrier Indomitable, flying off to Java at the end of January 1942 en route to reinforce the beleaguered squadrons at Singapore. Within a week Wright's CO had been killed and Wright was promoted to squadron leader. He damaged a Japanese bomber off the west coast of Singapore, but 232 was soon forced to evacuate to Sumatra. Wright was made CO of a composite squadron made up of the remaining Hurricanes. They were hopelessly outnumbered, and losses mounted. With only a few aircraft left, on March 1st 1942 Wright was ordered to pass his remaining Hurricanes to a group selected to stay behind and take his remaining pilots to Tjilatjap, on the south coast, from where they were to board a boat for Australia. Two Ford V8s were commandeered, and the party drove through the jungle at night, only to find that the last boat had been sunk. In vain they searched along the coast for other craft. A few days later the island fell to the Japanese, and Wright and his pilots were captured and spent more than three years in Japanese prison camps. After the war Wright was repatriated back to the UK via Guam and the US finally returning to England onboard the liner Queen Mary. Wright resumed his career as a fighter pilot flying the early jets and was a member of the RAFs official aerobatic team, No.247 Squadron, flying Vampires. In April 1948 he flew one of the six single-engine Vampire F3s of No.54 Squadron which made the first Atlantic crossing by jet aircraft. On returning back the the UK, Wright was appointed to command No 54. After spending a year at the Central Fighter Establishment Wright was appointed wing leader at Linton-on-Ouse with command of three fighter squadrons. In late 1956 he converted to the Hunter and took the Tangmere Wing to Cyprus for the Suez operations. He was then given command of the RAFs first Bloodhound ground-to-air missile squadron. In 1960 he was promoted to group captain and spent three years at Headquarters Fighter Command, where he was heavily involved in the introduction into service of the supersonic Lightning fighter. Wright was appointed CBE in 1964. He also received a Kings Commendation for Valuable Services in the Air and the Air Efficiency Award. Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM retired form the Royal Air Force in 1973. Sadly Air Commodore Ricky Wright passed away on the 5th of November 2007 aged 88.

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 With their brightly coloured checkertail tails there was no mistaking the P.51 Mustangs of the 325th Fighter Group. Escorting B-24s over Austria in August 1944, tangled with a group of Fw190 fighters. The ensuing dogfight spiraled down below the mountain peaks as Herky Green led the Checkertails in a low-level chase. Herky nails one Fw190. Behind him his pilots will take out the two Fw190. When all is done this day the 325th will be credited with 15 enemy fighters destroyed.

Checkertail Clan by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
Half Price! - £110.00
 Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical.  Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England.
Top Dressing in New Zealand (1) by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £900.00
 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £100.00
 On the morning of 21st April 1917, coastal airship No C.17 was on a routine patrol captained by Sub Lieutenant  E G O Jackson, when sometime around 8.00am, she was attacked by German seaplanes and shot down. Such was their vulnerability that these huge battlebags were an easy target for marauding enemy scouts, their single Lewis guns achieving little by way of defence. The Hansa Brandenburg W.12, on the other hand, was a nimble and useful aircraft that the Germans put to good use in the coastal defence role.

Hansa Brandenburg W.12 – Attack on the C.17 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2000.00

 Flight Lieutenant Ian <i>Widge</i> Gleed is depicted in his personal Hurricane 1 P2798 (LK-A) of 87 Sqn shooting down a Messerschmitt Bf.110 on 15th August 1940.  Just visible beneath the cockpit of the Hurricane is his mascot, Figaro, shown kicking a swastika.  His aircraft was also easily identifiable by the red flash on its nose, a feature that was retained even when P2798 was painted all black for its night fighter role. Gleed scored many victories before being shot down and killed whilst flying a Spitfire Vc in the Western Desert in April 1943.

Tribute to Flt Lt Ian R Gleed by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 The heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen slips quietly through the waters of Kiel Harbour as one of her own Arado Ar.196s flies overhead. In the background, Bismarck, wearing her Baltic camouflage, is alongside taking on supplies.

Prinz Eugen by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 Lancasters of 61 Squadron head out for the enemy coast during the night of 3rd November 1943. Seen in the lead Lancaster is Flt Lt Bill Reid flying QR-O. After sustaining two heavy attacks by enemy night fighters, killing two crew members and injuring Reid in the head, shoulders and hands. He carried on to the target, dropping accurately his bomb load. Navigating back by Pole Star and Moon, he lost consciousness on occasions due to blood loss. He managed to find his way Shipdharn. Upon landing the undercarriage collapsed but luckily did not catch fire. For his exploits that night he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lancaster VC by Graeme Lothian. (Y)
Half Price! - £240.00
 During a patrol on 6th July 1918, Christiansen spotted a British submarine on the surface of the Thames Estuary. He immediately turned and put his Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 floatplane into an attacking dive, raking the submarine C.25 with machine gun fire, killing the captain and five other crewmen. This victory was added to his personal tally, bringing his score to 13 kills by the end of the war, even though the submarine managed to limp back to safety. Christiansen survived the war and went on to work as a pilot for the Dornier company, notably flying the giant Dornier Do.X on its inaugural flight to New York in 1930. He died in 1972, aged 93.

Kapitanleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £37.50

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

Captain Charles Vane was born in 1680, and was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping.  Vane began piracy in 1716 and lasted 3 years. Vane captured a Barbados sloop and then a large 12-gun brigantine, which he renamed the Ranger.   Vane was among the pirate captains who operated out of the Bohama at the notorious base at New Providence after the colony had been abandoned by the British.  His pirate attacks made Captain Charles Vane well known to the Royal Navy and in February of 1718 Vincent Pearse, commander of HMS Phoenix cornered Vane on his ship the Lark.  Vane  had heard of the recent royal pardons that had been offered to pirates in exchange for a guarantee they would quit plundering, so Vane claimed he had actually been en route to surrender to Pearse and accepted the pardon on the spot,  Charle Vane gained his freedom but as soon as he was free of Pearse he ignored the pardon and resumed his pirate ways.  Charles Vane was again captured and in 1721 was executed by hanging at Gallows Point, Port Royal, Jamaica on March 29th 1721.

Captain Charles Vane by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
DHM1449. Tirpitz Passing Through Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman.

Tirpitz Passing Through Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £50.00
 The mighty Bismarck returns fire to the fast-approaching HMS Hood at the start of a battle that would see both adversaries tragically sunk. The Bismarck would later be attacked by Swordfish aircraft from HMS Ark Royal, damaging her stearing and allowing her to be caught by the British battleships Rodney and King George V. The once proud German battleship would be ruthlessly pounded into a twisted and burning wreck and finally finished by HMS Dorsetshire with torpedoes at around 10:30 hours on the morning of May 27th 1941. HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori combed the area of the sinking for survivors, between them picking up a total of 110 out of an original complement of 2,300.

Bismarck Replies to HMS Hood by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £295.00
 The Last of the heavy Cruisers built by Germany (5 in total) The picture shows Admiral Hipper making her first sortie on the 18th February 1940, accompanied by the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau on Operation Nordmark. (Search for allied convoys on the route between Britain and Norway)

The Narvik Squadron by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

 HMS Norfolk and HMS Belfast of Force I are shown engaging the Scharnhorst which has already been hit and disabled by both HMS Duke of York and the cruiser HMS Jamaica.  Scharnhorst was never to escape the clutches of the British and Norwegian forces for, having been slowed to just a few knots by numerous hits, fell victim to repeated torpedo attacks by the allied cruisers and destroyers that had trapped the German marauder.

HMS Norfolk at the Battle of the North Cape by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
Depicting Titanic with the sun going down for the last time.

Titanic by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £35.00
 The Japanese ship Takao at Flank speed, riding shotgun for the carrier

Flank Speed by Randall Wilson.
Half Price! - £35.00
 To increase the strength of the US fleet in the Pacific during the critical early months of the war, USS Indiana went through the Panama Canal. On the 28th of November 1942 USS Indiana joined Rear Admiral Lee's aircraft carrier screening force. For the next 11 months, USS Indiana helped protect USS Enterprise and USS Saratoga, which had been supporting the US invasion on the Solomon Islands. On the 21st of October 1943 USS Indiana went to Pearl Harbor, but after only a couple of weeks left to support forces designated for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. The battleship protected the carriers which supported the Marines during the bloody fight for Tarawa atoll. Then, in late January 1944, she bombarded Kwajalein for eight days prior to the Marshall Island landings on 1st February 1944. USS Indiana collided with the battleship USS Washington while refuelling destroyers, killing several men. Temporary repairs to her starboard side were made at Majuro and USS Indiana returned to Pearl Harbor on 13th February 1944 for additional repair work. The painting shows USS Indiana with one of the two carriers she protected.

USS Indiana, First Tour of Duty by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £230.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 US Marines of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd RCT, 2nd Marine Division, supported by LVTs and tanks, take part in the successful but bloody assault on Betio Island, part of the Tarawa Atoll. Operation Galvanic as it was known became the first step on the island road to Japan itself.

Red Beach Two, Tarawa Atoll, 20th November 1943 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Vielsalm, Belgium, 22nd December 1944.  Men of the 508th PIR, along with the rest of the 82nd Airborne Division were rushed to the Ardennes and deployed in an attempt to halt the onslaught of 6th SS Panzer Army, specifically Kampfgruppe Peiper.

Holding the Line by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Northern France, 22nd May 1940.  Sdkfz 222 light armoured cars of the SS Leibstandarte Regiment drive along French lanes on a reconnaissance patrol for the forces of General Heinz Guderian on their advance towards the French coast.

Eyes of the Army by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
  Panzer IVF2 tanks of 6th Panzer Division, Panzer Armee Hoth, attempt to fight their way through to the beleaguered Sixth Army at Stalingrad, 12th December 1942.  On the 21st the operation was abandoned when the expected breakout from Stalingrad failed to materialise, the relief column was only 25 miles from the city.

Operation Winter Tempest by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 Central Russia, 4th-12th July 1943. For Operation Citadel the Heavy tank battalion 503 was split into separate companies and attached to various panzer divisions. Rubbels 1st company went to 6th Panzer Division, and as such take part in the epic breakthrough on the 10th and 11th which came close to the collapse of the soviet southern front!

Alfred Rubbel at Kursk by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £80.00
 El Alamein, October 28th 1943, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel discusses the critical battle situation with the Commanding Officer of the 21st Panzer Division, in front of his Kampfstaffel.  This personal mobile headquarters comprised a variety of vehicles including a radio Panzer III, SDKfz 232 radio armoured car, Rommels famous SDKfz 250/3 communications half-track GREIF and captured British Honey light tanks.

The Desert Fox by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Having made contact the previous evening with troops of 4th Infantry Division pushing inland from Utah Beach, paratroopers of the 101st Airborne division The Screaming Eagles help mop up the pockets of German resistance in their general advance towards Carentan.

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Superb figure study of the 82nd Airborne in 1944.

82nd Airborne by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

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