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No.605 Sqn RAF

Founded : 5th October 1926
Country : UK
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
Known Aircraft Codes : UP, HE, NR

County of Warwick (Auxiliary)

Nunquam dormio - I never sleep

No.605 Sqn RAF

No.605 Sqn RAF Artwork



Enemy Approaching by David Pentland. (P)

Aces for : No.605 Sqn RAF
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Harbourne M Stephen22.50The signature of Harbourne M Stephen features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Archibald Ashmore Archie McKellar21.00
Christopher Bunny Currant15.00The signature of Christopher Bunny Currant features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Charles Palliser7.50The signature of Charles Palliser features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Bob Foster7.00The signature of Bob Foster features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Aircraft for : No.605 Sqn RAF
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by No.605 Sqn RAF. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Boston

Click the name above to see prints featuring Boston aircraft.


Boston

Full profile not yet available.

Gladiator



Click the name above to see prints featuring Gladiator aircraft.

Manufacturer : Gloster
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1945
Number Built : 746

Gladiator

GLOSTER GLADIATOR: A continuation form the Gloster Gauntlet aircraft the Gloster Gladiator (SS37) becoming designated the F.7/30 was named Gladiator on the 1st July 1935. The first 70 Gladiators had Under wing machine guns (Vickers or Lewis) before the browning became standard The first aircraft arrived at Tangmere airfield on in February 1937 to no. 72 squadron. at the outbreak of world war two a total of 218 Gladiators had been received by the Royal air force with a total of 76 on active service. They served also in the Middle eats and in 1940 when Italy joined the war was nearly the only front line fighter in the middle east. Between 1939 and 1941. the Gloster Gladiator flew in many war zones. flying in France, Greece, Norway, Crete Egypt Malta and Aden. The Aircraft claimed nearly 250 air victories. It stayed in front line duties until 1942, then becoming fighter trainer, and other sundry roles. It continued in these roles until the end of world war two. The Naval equivalent the Sea Gladiator a short service in the Middle east and European waters. A Total of 746 aircraft were built of these 98 were Sea Gladiators.. Performance. speed: 250mph at 17,500 feet, 257 mph at 14,600 Range 430 miles. Armament: Two fixed .3-03 browning machine guns

Hurricane



Click the name above to see prints featuring Hurricane aircraft.

Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1936
Number Built : 14533

Hurricane

Royal Air Force Fighter, the Hawker Hurricane had a top speed of 320mph, at 18,200 feet and 340mph at 17,500, ceiling of 34,200 and a range of 935 miles. The Hurricane was armed with eight fixed wing mounted .303 browning machine guns in the Mark I and twelve .303 browning's in the MKIIB in the Hurricane MKIIC it had four 20mm cannon. All time classic fighter the Hurricane was designed in 1933-1934, the first prototype flew in June 1936 and a contract for 600 for the Royal Air Force was placed. The first production model flew ion the 12th October 1937 and 111 squadron of the Royal Air Force received the first Hurricanes in January 1938. By the outbreak of World war two the Royal Air Force had 18 operational squadrons of Hurricanes. During the Battle of Britain a total of 1715 Hurricanes took part, (which was more than the rest of the aircraft of the Royal air force put together) and almost 75% of the Victories during the Battle of Britain went to hurricane pilots. The Hawker Hurricane was used in all theatres during World war two, and in many roles. in total 14,533 Hurricanes were built.

Meteor

Click the name above to see prints featuring Meteor aircraft.

Manufacturer : Gloster
Production Began : 1944
Number Built : 3947

Meteor

The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' first operational jet. Designed by George Carter, and built by the Gloster Aircraft Company, Armstrong-Whitworth, the Meteor first flew in 1943 and commenced operations on 27 July 1944 with 616 Squadron of the Royal Air Force (RAF). The Gloster Meteor was not an aerodynamically advanced aircraft but the Gloster design team succeeded in producing an effective jet fighter that served the RAF and other air forces for decades. Meteors saw action with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in the Korean War and other air forces used the Meteor. The Royal Danish Air Force, The Belgian Air Force and Isreali Air Force kept the Meteor in service until the early 1970's. A Total of 3947 meteors were built and two Meteors, WL419 and WA638, remain in service with the Martin-Baker company as ejection seat testbeds.

Spitfire



Click the name above to see prints featuring Spitfire aircraft.

Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

Vampire

Click the name above to see prints featuring Vampire aircraft.


Vampire

Full profile not yet available.
Signatures for : No.605 Sqn RAF
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Flight Lieutenant John Cambell
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant John Cambell
Flight Lieutenant John Cambell

John Cambell flew Spitfires with 234 Squadron, before joining 121 Eagle Squadron. After the transfer of the Eagles to the USAAF, John chose to remain with the RAF and was posted to 258 Squadron for the final defence of Singapore, and then to 605 Squadron defending Java. With four victories in the Far East to his credit, in March 1942 the squadron was over-run by the Japanese, and John became a POW in a harsh prison camp in Java for the next 3 and a half years.



Wing Commander Christopher Bunny Currant DSO DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Christopher Bunny Currant DSO DFC

12 / 3 / 2006Died : 12 / 3 / 2006
12 / 3 / 2006Ace : 15.00 Victories
Wing Commander Christopher Bunny Currant DSO DFC

Born 14th December 1911. One of the most succesful fighter pilots in the RAF, credited with 13 kills during the Battle of Britain. On 15th August 1940, with No. 605 Sqn, he downed two He111s and claimed a third probable. On 8th September he downed another bomber and damaged three more, sharing in two more the next day, downing two more and damaging a further three on the 15th of that month, before being shot down himself. The same afternoon, he got airborne again, shooting down a fighter. After the Battle of Britain, he became an instructor, before rejoining combat flying with No.501 Sqn. In August 1942 he took command of No. 122 Wing, leading them until the D-Day landings in June 1944 before taking a non-flying post until the end of the war. He died 12th March 2006.




Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC
12 / 3 / 2006Ace : 7.00 Victories
Wing Commander Bob Foster DFC

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, flying Hurricanes throughout the Battle of Britain with much success. 54(F) Sqn Spitfire 1942-1944 in Australia. Flew some missions in aircraft R4118, which saw a total of 49 combat missions, shooting down several enemy aircarft. It was in this aircraft that Bob Foster damaged two Ju88s and shared in the destruction of a third. He finished the war with 7 confirmed victories and 3 probables.



Flight Lieutenant Charles Palliser DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Flight Lieutenant Charles Palliser DFC

24 / 9 / 2011Died : 24 / 9 / 2011
24 / 9 / 2011Ace : 7.50 Victories
Flight Lieutenant Charles Palliser DFC

Born in West Hartlepool, Charles Palliser was educated at Brougham School and later attended a technical school. Joining the RAFVR at the outbreak of war in 1939, Charles Palliser was posted to No.3 ITW Hasting, moved to No.11 EFTS Perth on 5th December 1939 and in April 1940 went to No.6 FTS at RAF Little Rissington. Palliser converted to Hawker Hurricanes at No.6 OTU at RAF Sutton Bridge in July 1940 and joined No.17 Squadron at RAF Debden on 3rd August 1940 during the Battle of Britain. Palliser moved to RAF Tangmere with No.43 Squadron on 18th August 1940 and then to North Weald with 249 Squadron on 14th September 1940. On the 15th of September he claimed his first aerial victory. In April 1941 Palliser was commissioned and embarked with 249 Sqn on HMS Furious and on 10th May sailed for Gibraltar, and on arrival the squadron transferred to HMS Ark Royal. The squadron flew to Ta' Qali, Malta on 21st May 1941 to take part in the Battle of Malta. During that battle he claimed a further five victories, and on 27th November Palliser flew Gladiator Faith on a met flight. In January 1942 he was posted to 605 Squadron as flight commander. Palliser was awarded the DFC, which was gazetted on 30th January 1942. He left the island in February 1942 as one of the islands longest serving pilots and joined No.25 Air School at Standerton as flight commander, arriving in South Africa to take up the appointment on the 28th March 1942. Palliser was posted to No.62 CFS, Bloemfontein on 17th July, to 2 EFTS Randfontein on 19th October and then to 4 EFTS Benoni on 2nd September 1943. He returned to the UK and in October 1947 Palliser retired from the RAF, at the rank of Flight Lieutenant. Sadly, Charles Palliser died 24th September 2011.



Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC

27 / 8 / 2003Died : 27 / 8 / 2003
Wing Commander Peter Parrott DFC AFC

Born 28th of June 1920, Peter Parrott joined the RAF in 1938, completing his fighter pilot training before joining No.607 Sqn in early 1940. On the 10th of May 1940, he destroyed two He111s and damaged a further two, sharing in another the next day. He was then posted to No.145 Sqn, damaging a Bf110 on May the 22nd and an He111 four days later, an action which saw his aircraft sufficiently damaged to force him to crash land in Kent. During the Battle of Britain, Peter Parrott destroyed a Me109, Ju87, Ju88 and damaged an He111, before being posted to No.605 Sqn in September. After baling out of his damaged Hurricane in December 1940 and remaining with 605 Sqn until summer 1941, he became an instructor. From July 1943 he joined a number of Squadrons in Italy, returning to Britain after the war to become a test pilot. He died 27th August 2003.




F/Lt Ray Raby
Click the name above to see prints signed by F/Lt Ray Raby
F/Lt Ray Raby

F/Lt Ray Raby jojned the RAFVR in 1940. His flying training began in the USA, where he was retained as an instructor with both USAF and RAF wings. He qualified on his return for an Air Navigators Certificate. He was posted to 519 Squadron, Wick, on Spitfires prior to joining 542 Squadron, Benson PRU with Jerry Fray as Flight Commander. In 1943, he was posted to Benson and survived 58 operational sorties until he was demobbed in 1946. In 1947 he joined 605 (County of Warwick) Wsquadron, Raux AF, Honiley on Vampire and Meteor jet aircraft as flight commander until disbandment in 1957. His total hours flown are 3265.




Wing Commander Harbourne Stephen CBE, DSO, DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Harbourne Stephen CBE, DSO, DFC

20 / 8 / 2001Died : 20 / 8 / 2001
20 / 8 / 2001Ace : 22.50 Victories
Wing Commander Harbourne Stephen CBE, DSO, DFC

Flying Spitfires with 605 squadron he took part in the air battles over France and Dunkirk and throughout the thick of the Battle of Britain. He was one of the top scoring R.A.F. pilots at the end of 1940 with 22 and a half air victories. In 1942 he was posted to the far east where he took command of 166 wing, remaining in fighters until the end of the war. After the war he had a successful career in newspapers where he became managing Director of the Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph. He died on 20th August 2001.

Harbourne Stephen signing the art prints of Fighting Lady by Graeme Lothian. The original paining Fighter General can be seen in the background.



Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM

5 / 11 / 2007Died : 5 / 11 / 2007
Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, Officer Commanding 54(F) Sqn Vampire 1948-1949. Eric William Wright was born on September 21st 1919 at Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, and went to the Cambridge County School and the Technical College. Wright joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve in June 1939 and was called up when he had completed his training as a pilot. As a sergeant pilot Wright flew Hurricanes over south-east England during the Battle of Britain; Wright joined No 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron in July 1940, a few days before it left its Scottish base for Croydon. He saw a great deal of action during the summer of 1940, and in the early days of September he shared in the destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighter and a Dornier 17 bomber. On September 15, the climax of the Battle, and a day commemorated as Battle of Britain Day, Wright shot down a Dornier 17 over Maidstone and by the end of the year he had accounted for six enemy aircraft, probably destroyed three more and damaged a further six. At the end of November he was awarded an immediate DFM. Wright was made a flight commander of No.232 Squadron in 1941 and went to India. After the Japanese attacks on Malaya the squadron embarked on the aircraft carrier Indomitable, flying off to Java at the end of January 1942 en route to reinforce the beleaguered squadrons at Singapore. Within a week Wright's CO had been killed and Wright was promoted to squadron leader. He damaged a Japanese bomber off the west coast of Singapore, but 232 was soon forced to evacuate to Sumatra. Wright was made CO of a composite squadron made up of the remaining Hurricanes. They were hopelessly outnumbered, and losses mounted. With only a few aircraft left, on March 1st 1942 Wright was ordered to pass his remaining Hurricanes to a group selected to stay behind and take his remaining pilots to Tjilatjap, on the south coast, from where they were to board a boat for Australia. Two Ford V8s were commandeered, and the party drove through the jungle at night, only to find that the last boat had been sunk. In vain they searched along the coast for other craft. A few days later the island fell to the Japanese, and Wright and his pilots were captured and spent more than three years in Japanese prison camps. After the war Wright was repatriated back to the UK via Guam and the US finally returning to England onboard the liner Queen Mary. Wright resumed his career as a fighter pilot flying the early jets and was a member of the RAFs official aerobatic team, No.247 Squadron, flying Vampires. In April 1948 he flew one of the six single-engine Vampire F3s of No.54 Squadron which made the first Atlantic crossing by jet aircraft. On returning back the the UK, Wright was appointed to command No 54. After spending a year at the Central Fighter Establishment Wright was appointed wing leader at Linton-on-Ouse with command of three fighter squadrons. In late 1956 he converted to the Hunter and took the Tangmere Wing to Cyprus for the Suez operations. He was then given command of the RAFs first Bloodhound ground-to-air missile squadron. In 1960 he was promoted to group captain and spent three years at Headquarters Fighter Command, where he was heavily involved in the introduction into service of the supersonic Lightning fighter. Wright was appointed CBE in 1964. He also received a Kings Commendation for Valuable Services in the Air and the Air Efficiency Award. Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM retired form the Royal Air Force in 1973. Sadly Air Commodore Ricky Wright passed away on the 5th of November 2007 aged 88.


Battle of Britain Pilots for this Squadron
NameInfo
Sgt J. BudzinskiPolish, Served with : 605 and 145 Squadrons
S/Ldr. W. M. ChurchillBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed August 27th 1942
F/O T. P. M. Cooper-SlipperBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
F/O P. G. CroftsBritish, Served with : 615 & 605 Squadrons
Killed September 28th 1940
P/O C. F. Currant

Signed Artwork

WW2 Ace - 15.00 victories
British, Served with : 605 Squadron
Passed away 12th March 2006

Born 14th December 1911. One of the most succesful fighter pilots in the RAF, credited with 13 kills during the Battle of Britain. On 15th August 1940, with No. 605 Sqn, he downed two He111s and claimed a third probable. On 8th September he downed another bomber and damaged three more, sharing in two more the next day, downing two more and damaging a further three on the 15th of that month, before being shot down himself. The same afternoon, he got airborne again, shooting down a fighter. After the Battle of Britain, he became an instructor, before rejoining combat flying with No.501 Sqn. In August 1942 he took command of No. 122 Wing, leading them until the D-Day landings in June 1944 before taking a non-flying post until the end of the war. He died 12th March 2006.
S/Ldr. G. R. DFC EdgeBritish, Served with : 253 & 605 Squadrons
P/O C. E. EnglishBritish, Served with : 85 & 605 Squadrons
Killed October 7th 1940
F/O J. FlemingNew Zealand, Served with : 605 Squadron
F/O D. N. FordeBritish, Served with : 145 & 605 Squadrons
P/O G. M. ForresterBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed September 9th 1940 (collided with He111)
P/O R. W. Foster

Signed Artwork

WW2 Ace - 7.00 victories
British, Served with : 605 Squadron


605 Sqn Battle of Britain, flying Hurricanes throughout the Battle of Britain with much success. 54(F) Sqn Spitfire 1942-1944 in Australia. Flew some missions in aircraft R4118, which saw a total of 49 combat missions, shooting down several enemy aircarft. It was in this aircraft that Bob Foster damaged two Ju88s and shared in the destruction of a third. He finished the war with 7 confirmed victories and 3 probables.
Sgt B. FurstCzech, Served with : 310 and 605 Squadrons
P/O W. J. GlowackiPolish, Served with : 605 and 145 Squadrons
Killed September 24th 1940
F/O J. C. F. HayterNew Zealand, Served with : 605 and 615 Squadrons
F/O R. HopeBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed October 14th 1940
Sgt. H. N. DFM Howes

WW2 Ace - 12.00 victories
British, Served with : 85 & 605 Squadrons
Killed December 22nd 1940

P/O J. S. HumphreysNew Zealand, Served with : 605 Squadron
F/Lt. A. Ingle

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 605 Squadron
POW from September 11th 1943. Passed away 31st July 1999

Alec Ingle was commissioned in June 1940 and joined 615 Squadron at Drem flying Hurricanes before moving to Croydon during the Battle of Britain. He probably destroyed a Do17 in September; in October he shot down an Me109 and probably two more, and yet another victory in November, at which time he was appointed B Flight Commander. He later commanded 609 Squadron at Manston before leading 124 Wing in 1943 flying Typhoons. He was shot down in September 1943 after his Typhoon blew up in combat with an Fw190. Badly burned, he spent the remainder of the war as a POW in Stalag Luft III. Alec Ingle was awarded the AFC and DFC. Sadly Alec Ingle died on 31st July 1999.
Sgt K. H. JonesBritish, Served with : 85 & 605 Squadrons
P/O R. E. JonesBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
P/O S. J. MadleBritish, Served with : 615 & 605 Squadrons
Sgt. P. R. C. McintoshBritish, Served with : 151 & 605 Squadrons
Killed October 12th 1940
S/Ldr. A. A. DFC Mckellar

WW2 Ace - 21.00 victories
British, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed November 1st 1940

Born 10th April 1912. Joined No.602 Sqn City of Glasgow flying Spitfires and Hurricanes. Has at least part claim to the first British air victory of the war, and is credited with shooting down the first aircraft to fall on British soil since 1918. In all, he scored 21 victories before being killed when his Hurricane plunged into a field in Kent. He was awarded the DSO and DFC with Bar, the citations for which follow :

Citation for the DFC

This officer has at all times displayed the keenest desire to engage the enemy. In his first large-scale encounter against enemy aircraft he displayed a great sense of leadership and tactics in launching his flight against ninety Heinkel m's. As a result, at least four enemy aircraft were destroyed, of which Flight Lieutenant McKellar destroyed three. He has displayed outstanding leadership and courage.

Citation for the Bar to the DFC

During a period of eight days in the defence of London, Flight Lieutenant McKellar has destroyed eight hostile aircraft, bringing his total to twelve. He displays an excellent fighting spirit, is a particularly brilliant tactician and has led his squadron with skill and resource.

Citation for the DSO

This officer has led his squadron with outstanding courage and determination. He has destroyed 20 enemy aircraft, and his magnificent fighting spirit has proved an excellent inspiration to his fellow pilots.
P/O J. A. MilneCanadian, Served with : 605 Squadron
P/O I. J. DFC MuirheadBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed October 15th 1940
F/O P. L. Parrott DFC

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 145 & 605 Squadrons
Passed away 27th August 2003

Born 28th of June 1920, Peter Parrott joined the RAF in 1938, completing his fighter pilot training before joining No.607 Sqn in early 1940. On the 10th of May 1940, he destroyed two He111s and damaged a further two, sharing in another the next day. He was then posted to No.145 Sqn, damaging a Bf110 on May the 22nd and an He111 four days later, an action which saw his aircraft sufficiently damaged to force him to crash land in Kent. During the Battle of Britain, Peter Parrott destroyed a Me109, Ju87, Ju88 and damaged an He111, before being posted to No.605 Sqn in September. After baling out of his damaged Hurricane in December 1940 and remaining with 605 Sqn until summer 1941, he became an instructor. From July 1943 he joined a number of Squadrons in Italy, returning to Britain after the war to become a test pilot. He died 27th August 2003.
F/O C. W. PassyBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Sgt. D. C. PeacockBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed September 15th 1942
Sgt. H. W. PettitBritish, Served with : 1 & 605 Squadrons
Killed February 2nd 1941**
Sgt R. PudaCzech, Served with : 310 and 605 Squadrons
Sgt. L. F. RallsBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Sgt R. D. RitchieBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed August 9th 1940
P/O J. H. RothwellBritish, Served with : 601, 605 & 32 Squadrons
Killed February 22nd 1941
P/O K. Schadtler-LawBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
S/L D. R. ScottBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed November 8th 1941
P/O A. M. W. ScottBritish, Served with : 3, 607 & 605 Squadrons
Killed January 2nd 1941
Sgt. L. C. SonesBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
P/O P. D. ThompsonBritish, Served with : 32 & 605 Squadrons
P/O E. J. WatsonBritish, Served with : 605 Squadron
Killed February 26th 1942**
Sgt. E. W. Wright

Signed Artwork
British, Served with : 605 Squadron
Passed away November 5th 2007

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, Officer Commanding 54(F) Sqn Vampire 1948-1949. Eric William Wright was born on September 21st 1919 at Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, and went to the Cambridge County School and the Technical College. Wright joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve in June 1939 and was called up when he had completed his training as a pilot. As a sergeant pilot Wright flew Hurricanes over south-east England during the Battle of Britain; Wright joined No 605 (County of Warwick) Squadron in July 1940, a few days before it left its Scottish base for Croydon. He saw a great deal of action during the summer of 1940, and in the early days of September he shared in the destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighter and a Dornier 17 bomber. On September 15, the climax of the Battle, and a day commemorated as Battle of Britain Day, Wright shot down a Dornier 17 over Maidstone and by the end of the year he had accounted for six enemy aircraft, probably destroyed three more and damaged a further six. At the end of November he was awarded an immediate DFM. Wright was made a flight commander of No.232 Squadron in 1941 and went to India. After the Japanese attacks on Malaya the squadron embarked on the aircraft carrier Indomitable, flying off to Java at the end of January 1942 en route to reinforce the beleaguered squadrons at Singapore. Within a week Wright's CO had been killed and Wright was promoted to squadron leader. He damaged a Japanese bomber off the west coast of Singapore, but 232 was soon forced to evacuate to Sumatra. Wright was made CO of a composite squadron made up of the remaining Hurricanes. They were hopelessly outnumbered, and losses mounted. With only a few aircraft left, on March 1st 1942 Wright was ordered to pass his remaining Hurricanes to a group selected to stay behind and take his remaining pilots to Tjilatjap, on the south coast, from where they were to board a boat for Australia. Two Ford V8s were commandeered, and the party drove through the jungle at night, only to find that the last boat had been sunk. In vain they searched along the coast for other craft. A few days later the island fell to the Japanese, and Wright and his pilots were captured and spent more than three years in Japanese prison camps. After the war Wright was repatriated back to the UK via Guam and the US finally returning to England onboard the liner Queen Mary. Wright resumed his career as a fighter pilot flying the early jets and was a member of the RAFs official aerobatic team, No.247 Squadron, flying Vampires. In April 1948 he flew one of the six single-engine Vampire F3s of No.54 Squadron which made the first Atlantic crossing by jet aircraft. On returning back the the UK, Wright was appointed to command No 54. After spending a year at the Central Fighter Establishment Wright was appointed wing leader at Linton-on-Ouse with command of three fighter squadrons. In late 1956 he converted to the Hunter and took the Tangmere Wing to Cyprus for the Suez operations. He was then given command of the RAFs first Bloodhound ground-to-air missile squadron. In 1960 he was promoted to group captain and spent three years at Headquarters Fighter Command, where he was heavily involved in the introduction into service of the supersonic Lightning fighter. Wright was appointed CBE in 1964. He also received a Kings Commendation for Valuable Services in the Air and the Air Efficiency Award. Air Commodore Ricky Wright CBE DFC DFM retired form the Royal Air Force in 1973. Sadly Air Commodore Ricky Wright passed away on the 5th of November 2007 aged 88.

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Hurricanes of 607 County of Durham Squadron diving down and attacking Heinkels over the Needles on the Isle of Wight, after a raid on the southern coast. 607 squadron were stationed at nearby Tangmere from the start of September 1940 and saw continuous action throughout the Battle of Britain until the 16th October, when it withdrew to Scotland having raised its total victory to 102. Also aiding in the pursuit are Spitfires of 602 City of Glasgow Squadron based at Westhampnett.

Hurricanes Over the Needles by Graeme Lothian. (Y)
Half Price! - £310.00
 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944.  These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron.

Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
 A trio of Bell Huey UH-1s deliver ARVN Rangers to a drop zone in the central Highlands of Vietnam during 1970. The ubiquitous Huey saw action in an enormous variety of roles, Vietnam being the first true helicopter war, and it will perhaps be remembered by many a grateful GI for its (and its crews) part in many hundreds of daring rescues amid the unyielding and unfamiliar terrain of south east Asia.

DZ 9.00am by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 An Avro Anson comes under attack from an Me109.

Avro Anson by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00

 Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns from 16 Squadron, RAF Coltishall launches the Jaguar into another breathtaking display sequence.

Enter the Saint by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
  D for Donald of 270 squadron, Royal Air Force, out of Freetown, West Africa operating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was during routine operation search that D for Donald surprised U515 on the surface and immediately attacked the submarine. U515 in putting up stiff resistance blew a large hole in the hull of D for Donald and the magazine of the starboard side 0.5 twin Browning was hit and the subsequent shrapnel wounded both blister gunners. U515 escaped but was sunk by an American naval hunter group a year later. D for Donald limped back to base and managed to make the beach before it would sink completely.
Catalina Attack by John Wynne Hopkins (B)
Half Price! - £80.00
 Spitfire of 761 Training Squadron (attached to the Royal Navy) flies over the Forth Railway Bridge on the eve of World War Two, also shown is HMS Royal Oak departing Rosyth for the open sea.

Land, Sea and Air by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Half Price! - £130.00
 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.

Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Blackbeard the Terrible, otherwise known as Edward Teach, Thatch or Drummond. Circa 1718.

Damnation Seize My Soul by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £350.00
 Admiral Cuthbert Collingwoods flagship the Royal Sovereign comes under intense fire from the black-painted Spanish 3-decker, Santa Ana, and the French 74 Fougueux, just prior to breaking through the Franco-Spanish line at Trafalgar.
HMS Royal Sovereign by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £625.00
 USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) refuels an Adams class Destroyer during a dusk operation off the Vietnam coast as a pair of E8 Crusaders are readied for launch on the forward catapults.

USS Kitty Hawk by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £2750.00
Originally constructed as a Home Fleet Repair Ship, HMS Cyclops was later converted into a submarine depot ship and enjoyed a long career, both in the Mediterranean and in home waters.  Here she prepares to receive HMS Sceptre.  Another S-class submarine is already tethered alongside.

HMS Cyclops Prepares to Receive HMS Sceptre by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £27.50

Wednesday, April 10th, 1912. The mighty liner Titanic is shown at anchor in Cherbourg Harbour, all lights ablaze.  Due to her size, she can't pull into port as the piers are too small.  Instead, she is anchored offshore.  Cherbourg passengers finally board tenders and wait to be ferried out to Titanic.  Mail is brought aboard.  By 8:30 p.m. the anchor is raised and the Titanic leaves for Queenstown, Ireland.

RMS Titanic at Cherbourg by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 The pride of the Royal Navy, HMS Hood, leaves Portsmouth on her way to the Fleet Review of King George V in July 1935. HMS Hood is followed by the destroyer HMS Express.

HMS Hood and HMS Express Departing from Portsmouth 1935 by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 HM submarine H.28 enters Scapa Flow anchorage, passing the forlorn Battle Cruiser SMS Derfflinger and a group of sunken destroyers H.28 was one of the H class submarines. Launched in March 1918, she was finally scrapped in 1944.

Scapa Flow Graveyard by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00
HMS Prince of Wales is shown firing on the Bismarck and in the background a huge black cloud is all that is left of HMS Hood.

HMS Prince of Wales by Brian Wood (C)
Half Price! - £20.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 OT34 Flamethrower tank and men of Col. Krickmans 6th Guards Tank Brigade take part in the Soviet counter attacks of 13th-27th September in defence of the southern factory district of Stalingrad before the final offensive in October.

Motherland, The Battle of Stalingrad, September 1942 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Sturmtigers of Sturmmorser Company 1002, commanded by Lieutenant Zippel, take on ammunition in preparation for the battle to come. These fearsome monsters 38cm rocket projectors could penetrate up to 2.5m of reinforced concrete. Luckily for the Allies only 18 were completed by the wars end.

Preparing for the Day, the Reichswald, February 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
 After suppressing the initial German defences, the Sherman Crab flail tank of Lance Sgt Johnson, 3 Troop C Squadron the 22nd Dragoons, 79th Armoured Division, clears a path through a minefield to allow tanks of 27th Armoured Brigade, and men of 3rd Infantry Division to breakout from the beaches. Fire support from surviving Sherman DD (amphibious) tanks of 13th /18th Hussars (QMO), proved invaluable in the initial push towards Caen.

D-Day, Sword Beach, Normandy 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Panzer IVF2 tanks of 6th Panzer Division, Panzer Armee Hoth, attempt to fight their way through to the beleaguered Sixth Army at Stalingrad, 12th December 1942.  On the 21st the operation was abandoned when the expected breakout from Stalingrad failed to materialise, the relief column was only 25 miles from the city.

Operation Winter Tempest by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00

 Panzer v Ausf. D Panthers of SS Panther Division Das Reich make their debut during the initial stages of the German summer offensive for Kursk. This unit with others of the SS Panzer Korps made the deepest advances into the well-prepared Soviet lines. Complete success however, was to elude them when outrunning their supporting divisions at Prokhorovka they were forced to halt for six days.

Operation Zitadelle by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 A Tiger (P) Ferdinand, 7th Company, 654th Schwere Panzerjager Abteilung passes a knocked out Soviet Su122 on the German advance towards the village of Ponyri.  The fighting around this small agricultural settlement was some of the most savage of the entire battle.

The Battle for Ponyri Station, Kursk, 9th July 1943†by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Pioneers were among the first British troops to land on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day, by 1st August 1944 there were over 35,500 pioneers in Normandy. The painting shows the various activities of the pioneers during the D-Day landings.

Sword Beach by Terence Cuneo.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe.  No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00

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