Military Aviation Art, Military Art Prints

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Largest collection of original military art paintings, military art prints and pencil drawings by the leading military, aviation and naval artists, this exclusive range of over 4,000 military, naval and aviation art prints, many with free worldwide shipping, and a huge range of giclee canvas art prints, are all available at great prices, and even further discounts on our military print packs.

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Featured Artists : 

David Pentland

Military art from the first world war to modern day conflicts, including a vast number of different tanks and armoured vehicles.  Also a number of aviation and naval art prints.

Nicolas Trudgian

World renowned aviation artist.  Cranston Fine Arts purchased the remaining stock of Nick's published work several years ago.  Most of the print editions we purchased cannot be found elsewhere - we hold the only stock.

Ivan Berryman

One of the most prolific artists around, Ivan has created a massive and spectacular portfolio of aviation and naval art, with other subjects like motor racing and even Star Wars also included.  In addition to his current portfolio, we can also commission Ivan to produce new paintings for our customers - please contact us for more details.

Randall Wilson

Randall has a superb portfolio of naval artwork featuring ships from around the world. 

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Latest Military Art Releases

 The Inniskilling Dragoons capturing a German railway gun at Harbonnieres during the battle of Amiens, 1918.

Inniskilling Dragoons at Amiens by Jason Askew. (PC)


The Charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo - Sgt Ewart Captures the French Eagle by Jason Askew. (PC)


The Inniskillings at Waterloo by Jason Askew. (PC)
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (PC)

Latest Aviation Art Releases

 It is a record likely to stand for all time, Erich Hartmann's tally of 352 victories is more than any other pilot in history.  Posted to JG52 over Russia in August 1942 his new Kommodore, Dieter Hrabak, placed the novice pilot under the guidance of Paule Rossman, one of the unit's most experienced and respected Aces.  However, during his very first combat Hartmann became so disorientated that he got lost in cloud and ran out of fuel.  His undoubted skill as a pilot enabled him to survive the inevitable crash-landing, but a few days later and just minutes after scoring his first ever victory, he was shot down - again crash-landing. This time he only just escaped from his burning aircraft before it exploded.  Any other new pilot might have succumbed but Hartmann was made of sterner stuff and , with Rossman's help and guidance, it was not long before everyone in JG52 realised that he possessed exceptional skill.  By the summer of 1943 <i>the Blond Knight</i> and his colleagues were flying up to six missions a day and having now perfected his technique, it was unusual for him to finish a day without a victory.  Never claiming to be an expert marksman, his approach, which took nerves of steel and great flying skills, was to get as close to his enemy as possible before opening fire at the last minute.  Often flying head on, the risks of collision and damage were great - of the sixteen times Hartmann was brought down, eight were as a result of flying into the debris of his victim!  Hartmann's 352 victories were achieved with JG52 - all except one.  It happened during a brief two week spell at the beginning of February 1945 when the top Ace was placed in temporary command of I./JG53.  His new unit were based in Hungary where German Army Group South was in bitter retreat and the fighting was as tough and relentless as ever.  <i>The Blond Knight</i>portrays Erich Hartmann climbing out of his Bf109 G-6 at Weszperem's snow-covered airfield after returning from another arduous mission leading Stab I./JG53 with whom, on 4th February he downed a Yak-9.  It was his 337th victory.

The Blond Knight by Robert Taylor.
 Those Aces with over 100 victories were exceptional.  To reach 200 victories was a spectacular achievement.  Yet two men went even further and accomplished a feat that will never be repeated - both of them shot down more than 300 enemy aircraft which placed them in a league of their own.  They were the elite of the elite, and their names are legendary - Erich Hartmann and Gerhard Barkhorn.  It is no surprise that these iconic Aces scored their victories whilst flying with the legendary fighter wing JG52.  Active from the beginning of the war, the unit fought in the Battle of France, but suffered terrible losses during the Battle of Britain before transferring to the Eastern Front at the outset of Operation Barbarossa, and it was here that it solidified its fearsome reputation.  Operating the Bf109 throughout the war, the Geschwader boasted some of the greatest Luftwaffe pilots of world war two among its ranks - including the top three Aces of all time.  Such renowned pilots as Gunther Rall (275 victories), Wilhelm Batz (237 victories), Hermann Graf (212 victories) and Helmut Lipfert (203 victories) helped this formidable unit notch up more than 10,000 victories, making it the most successful fighter wing in history.  <i>Hunters at Dawn</i> features Hptm. Gerhard Barkhorn, Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG52.  The great Ace, flying his Bf109 G-6, leads the Stab as they climb out from their base near the Black Sea, early November 1943.  The crisp air of day break is temporarily punctuated by the roar of Daimler-Benz engines as the deadly Messerschmitt fighters set off on their daily hunt for Soviet aircraft over the front line.

Hunters at Dawn by Robert Taylor.
 Often referred to as the 'Whispering Giant', Bristol's sleek Type 175 Britannia represented a milestone in turboprop airliner design, although it was already something of an anachronism by the time it entered service, as the jet age was just getting underway. Nevertheless, 85 Britannias were built before production ceased in 1960, many serving with BOAC, as exemplified by G-ANBG, seen here before being re-registered because superstitious pilots disliked the letters 'NBG', believing them to be an acronym of 'No Bloody Good!'.

Bristol Britannia by Ivan Berryman.
 Supermarine Spitfire prototype K5054 is seen taking to the air for a test flight in June 1936 from Eastleigh Airport in Southampton. Few, at the time, could have known what an iconic aircraft R J Mitchell had designed, yet the beautiful, classic lines were there to see in the very first example.

Into History - Spitfire Prototype by Ivan Berryman.

Latest Naval Art Releases

 The mainstay of the Royal Navy's Coastal Forces fleet from 1941, the 72-foot Vosper MTBs were among the fastest and most successful ever built. With their three Packard 1400hp engines and bigger fuel tanks, these boats could reach speeds of up to 39 knots with a maximum range of 400 miles. Armament varied from boat to boat, but those depicted are fitted with the standard 21-inch torpedo tubes and a twin .5 inch MkV Vickers machine gun mounting. Crew was typically two officers and eleven ratings.

On the Step by Ivan Berryman.
 In January 1941, the young Mario Arillo was appointed the rank of Lieutenant Commander, placed in charge of the Regia Marina's submarine <i>Ambra</i> and was dispatched to the Mediterranean to help disrupt supplies to the Allied forces.  In May of that same year, Arillo attacked the British Dido Class Cruiser <i>HMS Bonaventure</i>, and Destroyers <i>HMS Hereward</i> and <i>HMS Stuart</i>, south of Crete, en route from Alexandria, the cruiser <i>Bonaventure</i> being sunk with great loss of life.  The <i>Ambra</i> is depicted here in a calmer moment, two of her crew scanning the horizon for 'business'.

Hunter's Dusk by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two.  On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells.  The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.

Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Sitting menacingly at a depth of 15 metres below the surface, just 2 km outside the heavily defended harbour of Alexandria, the Italian submarine Scire is shown releasing her three manned torpedoes, or <i>Maiali</i>, at the outset of their daring raid in which the British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant and a tanker, were severely damaged on 3rd December 1941.  All six crew members of the three <i>Maiali</i> survived the mission, but all were captured and taken prisoner.  Luigi Durand de la Penne and Emilio Bianchi can be seen moving away aboard 221, whilst Vincenzo Martellotta and Mario Marino (222) carry out systems checks.  Antonio Marceglia and Spartaco Schergat, on 223, are heading away at the top of the picture.

Assault from the Deep by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

NEW POSTCARDS : 2016

 

A new range of postcards is currently being produced from a decade worth of our aviation, military and naval art publications.  It has been almost ten years since we last produced a range of postcards that have remained popular ever since.  Now we are producing new cards and the first 40 are now available to purchase

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO SEE THE CARDS!

 

FEATURED ARTIST

Spencer Hodge


Spencer Hodge was born in 1943 and attended the Hastings School of Art and Royal West of England Academy. After a formal and academic art training he spent six years illustrating books and teaching material for the medical research Council. The dissection and drawing of the human body which this workinvolved gave him a profound understanding of the mechanics and structure of form. After leaving England, Spencer Hodge travelled widely, undertaking lond field trips for international conservation organisations such as the World Wide Fund for Nature. Spencer Hodge has journeyed to places such as India, West Africa, the United Arab Emirates and particularly to the game-rich areas of Tanzania and Kenya, in search of the stunning wildlife which has inspired him since his youth. Many of these trips culminated in successful exhibitions to raise funds for specific conservation projects. Spencer Hodge has acquired a reputation as one of the finest wildlife artists this century and is caknowledged by HRH the Duke of Edinburgh as one of the three best wildlife artists in the world. His original paintings now hang in many prestigious private and semi-public collections around the world.
Spencer Hodge

 

Dambusters Collection

Operation Chastise.  This exclusive range of Dambusters limited editions is without doubt the largest collection available, with many at special offer prices!

Click Here to see our Dambusters gallery.

 

D-Day Landings Collection

Fantastic range of military and aviation art depicting the D-Day landings on Utah, Juno, Gold, Sword and Omaha beaches of Normandy, in June 1944.

Click Here to see our D-Day gallery.

 

Pearl Harbor Collection

Our entire collection of Pearl Harbor prints in one place.

Click Here to see our Pearl Harbor gallery.

New Print Packs
Robert Tomlin World War Two Fighter Prints.
Ramraiders

Ramraiders by Robert Tomlin.
Muscateer

Muscateer by Robert Tomlin.
Save 15!
Lancaster Bomber Art Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Gerald Coulson.
Home
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
Off

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest by Gerald Coulson (B)
Save 133!
Battle of Waterloo Napoleon Prints.
Napoleons
Napoleons Last Inspection Before Waterloo by J P Beadle (B)
Napoleons

Napoleons Last Grand Attack by Ernest Crofts (B)
Save 53!
Spitfire Aviation Art Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
Back

Back from Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save 230!
Nicolas Trudgian WW2 Spitfire Print Pack.
Summer

Summer of 44 by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save 240!

Links to more sections of our site : 

(These are the pages of our site which existed before our new shop system was installed.  The pages are updated automatically from our shop and so are kept up to date regularly, but the best place to see all our prints is in the shop itself.)

CHRIS COLLINGWOOD ] DAVID PENTLAND ] IVAN BERRYMAN ] RANDALL WILSON ] BRIAN PALMER ] ANTHONY SAUNDERS ] Nicolas Trudgian ] ROBERT TAYLOR ] Military Art Search ] BRIAN WOOD ] Listing by  Artist ] GRAEME LOTHIAN ] TIM FISHER ] SIMON SMITH ] Gerald Coulson ] Michael Rondot ] MARK CHURMS ] GEOFF LEA ] STUART LIPTROT ] JIM LANCIA ] ALAN HERRIET ] JOHN HOPKINS ] DEMOULIN ] GORDON WILSON ] ROBERT BARBOUR ] RICHARD TAYLOR ] John D Shaw ] NEW RELEASES ] ANTIQUE MILITARY ] Military  Paperweights ]

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