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Titanic - Last Farewell by Robert Taylor. - Cranston Fine Arts Aviation, Military and Naval Art
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Titanic - Last Farewell by Robert Taylor.


Titanic - Last Farewell by Robert Taylor.

It was a bitterly cold, crystal clear night and the sea was flat and calm. In the crow's nest of RMS Titanic, four days out from Southampton, two vigilant lookouts shivered uncomfortably, the warmth of their breath steaming in the freezing air. With warnings of ice ahead they were both tense and alert, they had to be, especially as no-one had seen fit to issue them with binoculars. And then, at 11.40pm, they saw it dead ahead - an iceberg. With adrenalin pumping through their veins they rang the warning bell and hailed the bridge. As the First Officer urgently ordered 'hard-a-starboard' and put the engines into reverse, thirty-seven seconds slowly passed. Imperceptibly the Titanic began to turn, but it was too late. The lookouts could only stare in horror as the ship's starboard side struck the deadly ice. An ominous shudder ran through Titanic. Those passengers still awake glanced anxiously at one another - surely nothing could be amiss since this was the safest ship in the world, 'practically unsinkable' her owners had said, designed to float ever if three of her sixteen bulkheads were full of water. But now six were punctured and filling fast, Titanic was sinking. 'Practically unsinkable' had also meant that only twenty lifeboats had been installed, principally there to rescue others from sinking ships. Only when the final order to 'Abandon Ship' was given did the passengers realise there were nowhere near enough lifeboats to go round. In the tradition of the sea it would be a case of 'women and children first'. With tearful, heart-wrenching good-byes husbands said farewell to their families and stood bravely to await their fate, knowing their own chance of survival was probably zero. In the lifeboats the survivors could hardly bear to watch as the ship slowly died, her lights disappearing one by one until, just after a quarter past two in the morning, her stern suddenly reared and Titanic plunged to her watery grave. Over 1500 passengers and crew died with her. A few days earlier, however, the scene had been so different. The bands had played, the streamers flew and the crowds had cheered as the world's newest and largest liner slipped away from the White Star berth at Southampton for her maiden voyage to New York. RMS Titanic was a majestic sight as she sailed down Southampton Water and into the Solent accompanied by a flotilla of all shapes and sizes. This is the moment that Robert Taylor has chosen for this magnificent new painting. As some of the world's wealthiest people promenade on the deck to admire the occasion, others sipped their cocktails in opulent staterooms. The White Star had spared no expense for their important First Class passengers.
Item Code : DHM6241Titanic - Last Farewell by Robert Taylor. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTArtist Special Reserve edition of 400 prints.

Image size 28.5 inches x 15 inches (72cm x 38cm) Overall size 35 inches x 22 inches (89cm x 56cm)Artist : Robert Taylor£150.00

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Other editions of this item : Titanic - Last Farewell by Robert Taylor. DHM6241
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Centenary edition of 25 artist proofs. Image size 28.5 inches x 15 inches (72cm x 38cm) Overall size 35 inches x 22 inches (89cm x 56cm) Dean, Milvina
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
£325.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTCentenary edition of 135 prints.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 28.5 inches x 15 inches (72cm x 38cm) Overall size 35 inches x 22 inches (89cm x 56cm) Dean, Milvina
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
PRINTCentenary Tribute edition of 35 prints, supplied with matted print of working drawing for Titanic - Last Farewell.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 28.5 inches x 15 inches (72cm x 38cm) Overall size 35 inches x 22 inches (89cm x 56cm) Dean, Milvina
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
REMARQUE Tribute edition of 15 remarques, supplied with matted print of working drawing for Titanic - Last Farewell.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 28.5 inches x 15 inches (72cm x 38cm) Overall size 35 inches x 22 inches (89cm x 56cm) Dean, Milvina
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
REMARQUE Tribute edition of 5 double remarques, supplied with matted print of working drawing for Titanic - Last Farewell.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 28.5 inches x 15 inches (72cm x 38cm) Overall size 35 inches x 22 inches (89cm x 56cm) Dean, Milvina
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

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