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Rangers on the Rampage by Robert Taylor. - Cranston Fine Arts Aviation, Military and Naval Art
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Rangers on the Rampage by Robert Taylor.


Rangers on the Rampage by Robert Taylor.

Flying the high speed low level Day Ranger missions in the Mosquito was one of the most exhilarating forms of aerial combat experienced by aircrews in WWII. Given a free hand at squadron level to select targets of opportunity deep inside enemy held territory, operating the fastest piston engined aircraft of the war, the Ranger Mosquito crews wreaked havoc in the air and on the ground literally all over occupied Europe. Approaching their targets at tree top height, often completely undetected, the element of surprise was usually total; one pair of Mosquitoes arriving over an airfield near Kronigsburg found a ceremonial parade in progress, broke up the party, and departed within seconds leaving five aircraft burning and a bunch of German generals diving for cover beneath thei staff cars! Typical of the Day Ranger squadrons was No.418 City of Edmonton Squadron RCAF. Flying the Mosquito Fighter-Bomber MkVI, they completed over 3000 effective missions, destroyed 172 enemy aircraft - 73 on the ground - damaged a further 103, and in addition brought down 83 buzz-bombs and destroyed countless vehicles. In company with other Mosquito Ranger squadrons, they rampaged across Europe with outstanding courage in the best traditions of the RAF and Commonwealth Air Forces. Robert Taylors painting dramatically brings to life a Mosquito attack on a German fighter station deep inside Germany. Arriving over the target at little above hangar height, the two-ship mission announce their arrival by raking the field with cannon and machine gun fire. Within seconds both aircraft have scored direct hits with their 50lb bombs, and before the defensive flak guns can get the range, the pair have departed for home.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : DHM2161Rangers on the Rampage by Robert Taylor. - This Edition
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PRINT RAF limited edition of 850 prints.

SOLD OUT (June 2009)
Paper size 32 inches x 23 inches (81cm x 58cm) Broom, T J Tommy
Broom, Ivor
Cunningham, John (matted on companion print)
Kearns, T
Patterson, Charles
Sismore, E B Ted
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £285
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Other editions of this item : Rangers on the Rampage by Robert Taylor DHM2161
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ARTIST
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Limited edition of artist proofs.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 32 inches x 23 inches (81cm x 58cm) Broom, T J Tommy
Broom, Ivor
Cunningham, John (matted on companion print)
Kearns, T
Patterson, Charles
Sismore, E B Ted
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £285
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ANZAC Edition of 25 artist proofs.

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Paper size 32 inches x 23 inches (81cm x 58cm) Broom, Ivor
Cowper, Bob
Kearns, T
Stevens, F S Fred
Williams, S J
Walker, Brian (companion print)
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £165
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ARTIST
PROOF
RCAF edition of 20 artist proofs.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 32 inches x 23 inches (81cm x 58cm) Fumerton, Moose (companion print)
Broom, Ivor
Kearns, T
Bannock, Russ
Cunningham, John
Sismore, E B Ted
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £245
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
PRINTANZAC Edition of 250 prints.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 32 inches x 23 inches (81cm x 58cm) Broom, Ivor
Cowper, Bob
Kearns, T
Stevens, F S Fred
Williams, S J
Walker, Brian (companion print)
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £165
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
PRINTRCAF limited edition of 200 prints.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 32 inches x 23 inches (81cm x 58cm) Fumerton, Moose (companion print)
Broom, Ivor
Kearns, T
Bannock, Russ
Cunningham, John
Sismore, E B Ted
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £245
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Extra Details :
About this edition :

Supplied with companion print entitled Moonlighting by Robert Taylor, sized 18 inches by 13.5 inches (46cm x 34cm) featuring the 604 Sqn Beaufighter of John Cats Eyes Cunnignham. The companion print is signed by Group Captain John Cunningham CBE DSO DFC AE DL FRAeS.

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Air Commodore E. B. Ted Sismore DSO DFC AFC (deceased)
*Signature Value : £55

Air Commodore Edward Barnes Sismore DSO, DFC, and two bars, AFC was born on the 23rd June 1921 at Kettering, Northamptonshire. Sismore joined the RAF in 1939 as aircrew but became a Flight Sergeant on the 29th of August 1942. He was posted to No 110 Squadron, operating Blenheims, and flew anti-shipping patrols and attacked ports in the Low Countries and France at night. Returning from one night-time operation, his Blenheim hit the sea – but his pilot managed to drag the aircraft clear and they made a safe landing. After 30 operations he was rested before converting to the Mosquito and joining No 105 Squadron under Wing Commander Hughie Edwards, VC. He was also later given an emergency commission as a general Duties Branch Pilot Officer in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, being given a permanent commission on the 1st of February 1945. On the morning of January 31 1943, Reynolds and Sismore led a small force of Mosquitos on the RAF's first daylight bombing attack on Berlin, a round trip of 1,100 miles. The bombers were ordered to arrive at exactly 11am, when Goering and Goebbels were due to address a rally commemorating the 10th anniversary celebrations of Hitler's regime. The Mosquitos flew at low level over Germany and, as they crossed the Elbe, climbed to 25,000ft for their attack, which was carried out exactly on time and photographed by Sismore as it happened. On their return the crews were able to hear a tape recording from German radio. As the announcer introduced Goering to the crowds, bombs could be heard exploding. Goering never delivered his speech, and his constant boasts about the security of the Fatherland were proved to be empty promises. Among those decorated after the attack was Sismore, who was awarded a DFC. Throughout the spring of 1943, Reynolds and Sismore — who was described by a colleague as the most brilliant navigator — led many daylight attacks, their targets including railway workshops, steelworks and power stations, some deep inside Germany. When Reynolds was appointed CO of No 139 Squadron, Sismore remained as his navigator. On May 27 1943 they led a force of six Mosquitos on the RAF's deepest ever daylight low-level penetration of Germany from Britain. The mission was to attack the Schott glass works and Zeiss optical works at Jena, near Leipzig. Visibility was very poor as they flew at treetop height over Germany, and was reduced to 1,500 yards as they approached the target. But Sismore's navigation was perfect, and as they dodged balloons and intense anti-aircraft fire, delayed action bombs were dropped — despite Reynolds being wounded. The aircraft was badly damaged but was nursed back to base. Reynolds was awarded a Bar to his earlier DSO and Sismore also received a DSO. Sismore continued on operations and transferred to No 21 Squadron as the navigation leader. In February 1944, by now recognised as the RAF's finest low-level navigator, he was instructed to plan an attack to release French Resistance leaders imprisoned in Amiens Jail in northern France. He was to lead the raid with Air Vice-Marshal Basil Embry (the commander of No 2 Group), but Embry's chiefs forbade him to fly because he was too valuable an asset. When Sismore indicated that he could fly with someone else, Embry retorted: No, you won't — if I don’t go, you don't go. The operation went ahead without them, and was a complete success, except that Embry's replacement as leader, Group Captain Charles Pickard (who had won three DSOs and a DFC) was shot down and killed along with his navigator. Once again flying with Reynolds, Sismore on October 31st 1944 led a force of 24 Mosquitos in a raid on the Gestapo headquarters lodged in the buildings of Aarhus University in Denmark. The surprise attack, in misty weather, was delivered from low level and was a complete success. The head of the SS was killed, one of his officers writing: A terrible disaster happened when our HQ was shot up by English airmen. For their outstanding leadership, both Reynolds and Sismore received a Bar to their DFCs. Sismore continued to lead low-level daylight precision raids. On March 20th 1945 he led a force to attack the Gestapo HQ in the Shell House, Copenhagen. Once again his precise navigation resulted in a successful attack by the leading formation, and the building was destroyed. Tragically, a following Mosquito was shot down and crashed on a school, killing many children. However, 30 Danish patriots escaped and 150 Gestapo men were killed. The Danish Resistance asked for one more attack to release prisoners, this time from the Gestapo HQ in Odense. Sismore navigated the formation of six aircraft on the last of the 'Mosquito daylight spectaculars', and the small force destroyed the heavily camouflaged building. For his part in these two operations, Sismore was awarded a second Bar to his DFC. After the war Sismore remained in the Royal Air Force and with Squadron leader Mick martin (former Dambuster) broke the flying record for the London to Cape Town, 6,727 mile journey, completing it in 21 hours and 31 minutes. He was later awarded the Royal Aero Clubs Britannia Trophy for 1947. In 1962 Sismore was promoted to Group Captain and later became Station Commander of RAF Bruggen in Germany and in the late 1960s became commanding Officer of the Royal Air Force Central Reconnaissance Establishment at RAF Brampton. Air Commodore Edward Barnes Sismore died March 22nd 2012.


The signature of Air Marshal Sir Ivor Broom KCB CBE DSO DFC AFC (deceased)

Air Marshal Sir Ivor Broom KCB CBE DSO DFC AFC (deceased)
*Signature Value : £50

Entering the RAF in 1940 he joined No 114 Squadron as a sergeant pilot flying Blenheims. After 12 operations he and his crew were allocated to No 105 Squadron and then No 107 Squadron, the last remaining Blenheim Squadron in Malta. The Squadron remained there without relief for five months carrying out low level attacks on the shipping. Very few of the original crews survived the detachment, in fact he was commissioned during this period, when 107 Squadron had lost all their officers and for a short time was the only officer, other than the CO, in the Squadron. At the end of this tour he was awarded the DFC. In early 1943 he became one of the first Mosquito instructors in the Pathfinder Force and later moved to No 571 Squadron with the Light Night Strike Force. He then formed No 163 Squadron as acting Wing Commander. He was awarded a bar to his DFC for a low level moonlight mining attack on the Dormund - Ems Canal from 50ft and then a second bar for getting a 4000lb bomb into the mouth of a railway tunnel during the final German Ardennes offensive. During his time on Mosquitoes his navigator was Tommy Broom, together they formed an inseparable combination. Remaining with the RAF after WWII and in accordance with peacetime rules for a much smaller Air Force he was reduced in rank first to Squadron Leader and then to Flight Lieutenant in 1948. Promoted to Air Marshal in 1974 he became the Head of the UK National Air Traffic Services and was the first serving officer to be appointed to the Board of the Civil Aviation Authority. Retiring from the RAF in 1979 he has been actively engaged in civil aviation since then. He died 24th January 2003.


The signature of Group Captain John Cunningham CBE DSO DFC AE DL FRAeS (deceased)

Group Captain John Cunningham CBE DSO DFC AE DL FRAeS (deceased)
*Signature Value : £60 (matted)

John Cunningham joined the RAF in 1935 with 604 Squadron. At the outbreak of World War Two he was based at North Weald flying Blenheims on day escort and night fighter operations. In September 1940 he converted onto Beaufighters equipped with radar, the first aircraft that made night fighting really possible. In November he had the Squadrons first successful night combat. He took command of 604 Squadron in August 1941. After a period at HQ81 Group, he was posted on his second tour to command 85 Squadron equipped with Mosquitoes. In March 1944 with 19 night and 1 day victory he was posted to HQ11 Group to look after night operations. The most famous Allied night fighter Ace of WWII - 20 victories. He died 21st July 2002. Born in 1917, Group Captain John Cunningham was the top-scoring night fighter ace of the Royal Air Force. Cunningham joined the RAF in 1935 as a Pilot Officer. He learned to fly in the Avro 504N and was awarded his wings in 1936. While assigned to the Middlesex Squadron Auxiliary based at Hendon, Cunningham received instruction in the Hawker Hart prior to moving on the Hawker Demon. The Demon was a two-seat day and night fighter. Cunningharns squadron was mobilized in 1938 following the Czechoslovak crisis. His No. 604 unit was moved to North Weald. Later in 1938 his unit returned to Hendon and was reequipped with the more modern Blenheim 1 fighter. In August of 1939 the unit was again mobilized and returned to North Weald. The Squadron was primarily utilized to provide daylight air cover for convoys. Lacking radar the Blenheim was relatively useless as a night fighter. In September of 1940 the unit was moved to Middle Wallop and the first Bristol Beaufighters arrived. The Beatifighter had a modestly effective, although often unreliable radar. It was an excellent aircraft with reliable air-cooled engines and four 20mm cannons. Cunningham attained the units first night victory in the Beaufighter, and his tally rose steadily. He was promoted to Wing Commander of 604 Squadron in August of 1941. Cunningham completed his first combat tour of duty in mid-1942 with a total of 15 victories. He was then posted to H.Q. 81 Group, which was an operational training group under the Fighter Command. In January of 1943 Cunningham was transferred to command of No. 85 Squadron which was equipped with the Mosquito. With the higher speed of the Mosquito, Cunningham was successful at downing Fw-190s, something impossible in the slower Beaufighter. Cunningham completed his second tour in 1944 with a total of nineteen victories at night and one by day. He was promoted to Group Captain at that time, and was assigned to H.Q. 11 Group. Cunninghams radar operator Sqd. Ldr. Jimmy Rawnsley participated in most of Cunninghams victories. The 604 Squadron was disbanded in 1945, but in 1946 Cunningham was given the honor of reforming the Squadron at Hendon - flying the Spitfire. Cunningham left the RAF in 1946 and joined the De Havilland Aircraft Co. at Hatfield as its Chief Test Pilot. Cunningham had a long and distinguished career in the British aviation industry, retiring from British Aerospace in 1980. Cunningham was appointed OBE in 1951 and CBE in 1963. He was awarded the DSO in 1941 and Bars in 1942 and 1944; the DFC and Bar in 1941, also the Air Efficiency Award (AE). He also held the Soviet Order of Patriotic War 1st Class and the US Silver Star. Group Capt John Cunningham died at the age of 84 on the 21st July 2002.
Squadron Leader Charles Patterson
*Signature Value : £35

Charles Patterson joined the RAF on the outbreak of WWII and flew Whitleys. He switched to Blenheims in 1940 with 114 Squadron on anti-shipping operations over Norway. After a period instructing he briefly flew Bostons before converting to Mosquitoes with 105 Squadron flying mostly Daylight raids, but also the first night raid to Berlin. In January 1943 he was selected as pilot for the Mosquito Film Unit and flew Mosquito DZ414 (now restored) on over 20,000 operational hours both day and night. In September 1943 he converted 3 Ventura Squadrons to Mosquitoes under Group Captain Pickard. In total he completed an unprecedented 3 tours on Mosquitoes, his final tour being with 487 Squadron (New Zealand) mainly on strikes against V1 sites. On D-Day he flew the film unit Mosquito over the beach head during the invasion.
The signature of Squadron Leader T Kearns

Squadron Leader T Kearns
*Signature Value : £40

New Zealander Terry Kearns joined the RNZAF in December 1940, transferring to England in 1941 to join 75 (NZ) Squadron, flying Wellingtons. In 1942 he took part in the first 1000 bomber raids before joining 156 Squadron Pathfinders. After a period as an instructor, he joined 617 Squadron at Warboys on operations. He flew the Mosquito FBVI on precision low-level target marking throughout 1944. He took part in most of 617s major operations, including raids on the Samur rail tunnel, and the V1 rocket sites.


The signature of Squadron Leader TJ Tommy Broom DFC (deceased)

Squadron Leader TJ Tommy Broom DFC (deceased)
*Signature Value : £45

Thomas John Broom was born on January 22 1914 at Portishead, Bristol, and educated at Slade Road School, leaving when he was 14 to work as a garage hand. As soon as he reached his 18th birthday he enlisted in the RAF and trained as an armourer. He served in the Middle East, initially in Sudan, and in 1937 was sent to Palestine to join No 6 Squadron. With the threat of war in Europe, however, there was an urgent need for more air observers; Broom volunteered and returned to Britain for training. In February 1939 he joined No 105 Squadron at Harwell, which was equipped with the Fairey Battle. On the day the Second World War broke out No 105 flew to Reims in northern France to support the British Expeditionary Force, and within three weeks Broom had flown his first reconnaissance over Germany. During a raid on Cologne in November 1940 his aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire, but the crew managed to struggle back to England where they were forced to bail out as they ran out of fuel. For the next 12 months Broom served as an instructor. He returned to his squadron in January 1942, just as the Mosquito entered service, and on August 25 was sent to attack a power station near Cologne. As the aircraft flew at treetop height across Belgium, the crew spotted an electricity pylon. The pilot tried to avoid it but the starboard engine struck the top of the pylon and the aircraft ploughed into pine trees. Both men survived the crash, and were picked up by members of the Belgian Resistance. They were escorted to St Jean de Luz by the Belgian-run "Comet" escape line, and Broom crossed the mountains under the aegis of a Spanish Basque guide on September 8; his pilot followed him two weeks later. Twenty-five years after the event Broom returned to St Jean de Luz to meet the woman who had sheltered him from the Germans. After the German advance into the Low Countries on May 10 1940, the Battle squadrons were thrown against Panzers and attacked the crucial bridges across the main rivers, suffering terrible losses. After the fall of France, Broom and some of his comrades managed to reach Cherbourg to board a ship for England. No 105 Squadron was re-equipped with the Blenheim, and during the Battle of Britain Broom attacked the German barges assembling at the Channel ports in preparation for an invasion of England. After spending a period as an instructor at 13 OTU he rejoined 105 Squadron on Mosquitoes, they were in fact the first squadron in the RAF to receive them. Through early 1942 he was navigator on many of the daylight raids carried out by 105 Squadron. In August 1943 Tommy Broom was the chief ground instructor at the Mosquito Training Unit when he first met his namesake Flight Lieutenant Ivor Broom (later Air Marshal Sir Ivor Broom), an experienced low-level bomber pilot. They immediately teamed up and flew together for the remainder of the war, in 163 Squadron as part of the Light Night Strike Force forming a formidable on Mosquitoes including the low level attack on the Dortmund - Ems Canal and completing 58 operations together, including 22 to Berlin. Known as The Flying Brooms Initially they joined No 571 Squadron as part of Air Vice-Marshal Don Bennetts Pathfinder Force, and on May 26 1944 they flew their first operation, an attack on Ludswigshafen. On August 9 they took part in a spectacular night-time mission to drop mines in the Dortmund-Ems Canal. They descended rapidly from 25,000ft to fly along the canal at 150ft, releasing their mines under heavy anti-aircraft fire. The force of eight Mosquitos closed the canal for a number of weeks. Tommy Brooms brilliant navigation had helped ensure the success of the raid, and he was awarded a DFC. The Brooms took part in another daring attack on New Years Day 1945. In order to stem the flow of German reinforcements to the Ardennes, the RAF mounted operations to sever the rail links leading to the area, and the Brooms were sent to block the tunnel at Kaiserslauten. They were approaching the tunnel at low level just as a train was entering it. They dropped their 4,000lb bomb, with a time delay fuse, in the entrance and 11 seconds later it exploded, completely blocking the tunnel – the train did not emerge. Tommy Broom received a Bar to his DFC and his pilot was awarded a DSO. When Ivor Broom was given command of No 163 Squadron, Tommy went with him as the squadrons navigation leader and they flew together until the end of the war. Their last five operations were to Berlin, where searchlights posed a perpetual problem. On one occasion they were coned for as long as a quarter of an hour. After twisting, turning and diving to escape the glare, Ivor Broom asked his disoriented navigator for a course to base. Tommy replied: "Fly north with a dash of west, while I sort myself out." A few weeks later Tommy Broom was awarded a second Bar to his DFC – an extremely rare honour for a bomber navigator. Tommy Broom left the RAF in September 1945, but he and his pilot remained close friends until Sir Ivors death in 2003. Sadly Tommy Broom passed away on 18th May 2010
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
MosquitoUsed as a night fighter, fighter bomber, bomber and Photo-reconnaissance, with a crew of two, Maximum speed was 425 mph, at 30,300 feet, 380mph at 17,000ft. and a ceiling of 36,000feet, maximum range 3,500 miles. the Mosquito was armed with four 20mm Hospano cannon in belly and four .303 inch browning machine guns in nose. Coastal strike aircraft had eight 3-inch Rockets under the wings, and one 57mm shell gun in belly. The Mossie at it was known made its first flight on 25th November 1940, and the mosquito made its first operational flight for the Royal Air Force as a reconnaissance unit based at Benson. In early 1942, a modified version (mark II) operated as a night fighter with 157 and 23 squadron's. In April 1943 the first De Haviland Mosquito saw service in the Far east and in 1944 The Mosquito was used at Coastal Command in its strike wings. Bomber Commands offensive against Germany saw many Mosquitos, used as photo Reconnaissance aircraft, Fighter Escorts, and Path Finders. The Mosquito stayed in service with the Royal Air Force until 1955. and a total of 7781 mosquito's were built.
Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

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