Military-Art.com Home Page
Order Enquiries (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
MILITARY
ART
AVIATION
ART
NAVAL
ART

Product Search         

Officer, 4th Foot 1743 by P H Smitherman - Cranston Fine Arts Aviation, Military and Naval Art
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 10 hours, 9 minutes!
View our Special Offers

Officer, 4th Foot 1743 by P H Smitherman


Officer, 4th Foot 1743 by P H Smitherman

This officer, details of whose dress are taken from a contemporary painting, is shown dressed for duty. On active service he would be armed with a spontoon or a fusil, the latter if he were an officer in a grenadier company. His coat is similar to that worn by private soldiers in the regiment, but theirs had laced button-holes on the lapels and ornamental slashes on the sleeves. His pockets are rather unusual; they were usually cut horizontally, and not vertically as these are, but the pockets of officers coats displayed a very remarkable variety. The three-cornered flaps which remained on the tails of the full dress tunics of most regiments until 1914 were a survival of a pocket such as this. The full-bottomed wig worn hitherto has now been abandoned for a much neater affair, in fact the officers own hair specially treated and powdered. This surprising fashion persisted until about 1808. The hair on top of the head was first cut off, and then made to grow backwards instead of forwards by being plastered down with grease. The hair at the sides was curled with curling tongs and the rest tied in a queue at the back, being kept in place by a string or ribbon. Officers used to do one anothers hair, and the ability to set hair was well considered a social accomplishment. The professional barber would dress it about once a fortnight. Those whose hair was not long enough to make a good queue had to order a false one. Before a big parade hair might well be dressed the day before, and the unfortunate officer would then have to sleep on his face to avoid disturbing his coiffure. the hair so treated must have been usually filthy, and we have a vivid description from an officer of the smell of the soldiers heads in church on Sunday on a hot day. The 4th Foot were raised in 1680 as the 2nd tangier Regiment, but were renamed the Kings Own Royal Regiment by King George I in 1715, a title which they have retained, with minor variations, throughout their history.
Item Code : PHS0011Officer, 4th Foot 1743 by P H Smitherman - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT One available.

Image size 14 inches x 10 inches (36cm x 25cm)none£24.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


General descriptions of types of editions :

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page