Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Aircraft
Index
Squadron
Index
Aviation Art
by Country
Aviation
Signatures Index
Aviation
Artists Index
Aviation
Art Offers
Product Search        

Colonel Duerr J Schuh

Ace with 5.00 Victories

No Photo Available

Duerr Schuh flew his first combat mission in July 1944. Flying 61 missions in the P-51 with the 352nd Fighter Group, he took part in the Battle of the Bulge. The day following Christmas, 1944, while covering a bombing run, he jumped a group of Me109s, shooting down three in a single action. He ended the war an Ace.

Items Signed by Colonel Duerr J Schuh

Flying low over the picturesque village of Thaxted, in the cold winter of 1944-45, the P-51D Mustangs of the 78th Fighter Group return to Duxford after a tiring eight hour escort mission. With dusk approaching, low on fuel, the fighters have about 20......
Return to Duxford by Robert Taylor
SOLD OUT
Flying low over the picturesque village of Thaxted, in the cold winter of 1944-45, the P-51D Mustangs of the 78th Fighter Group return to Duxford after a tiring eight hour escort mission. With dusk approaching, low on fuel, the fighters have about 20......NOT
AVAILABLE
Flying low over the picturesque village of Thaxted, in the cold winter of 1944-45, the P-51D Mustangs of the 78th Fighter Group return to Duxford after a tiring eight hour escort mission. With dusk approaching, low on fuel, the fighters have about 20......
Return to Duxford by Robert Taylor (AP)
SOLD OUT
Flying low over the picturesque village of Thaxted, in the cold winter of 1944-45, the P-51D Mustangs of the 78th Fighter Group return to Duxford after a tiring eight hour escort mission. With dusk approaching, low on fuel, the fighters have about 20......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Colonel Duerr J Schuh

Colonel Duerr J Schuh

Squadrons for : Colonel Duerr J Schuh
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Colonel Duerr J Schuh. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

352nd Fighter Group

Country : US
Fleet Air Arm

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of 352nd Fighter Group
352nd Fighter Group

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Colonel Duerr J Schuh
A list of all aircraft associated with Colonel Duerr J Schuh. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Mustang



Click the name above to see prints featuring Mustang aircraft.

Manufacturer : North American

Mustang

The ubiquitous North American P-51 Mustang, which many consider to be the best all-around fighter of WW II, owes its origins to the British Air Ministry. Following Britains entry into WW II in 1939, the RAF was interested in purchasing additional fighter aircraft from American sources, particularly the Curtiss P-40. Curtiss, which was busy, was unable to guarantee timely delivery so the British approached North American Aviation as a possible second source for the P-40. North American chose to propose its own fighter design which would use the same Allison engine as the P-40. Utilizing new laminar flow wings, the North American fighter was expected to have performance better than the P-40. Developed in record time the new aircraft was designated as a Mustang I by the Brits, whereas the USAAF ordered two for evaluation which were designated XP-51 Apaches. Intrigued with the possibility of using this aircraft also as a dive bomber, North American proposed this to the USAAF which decided to order 500 of the P-51 aircraft to be modified for dive bombing use. Designated as the A-36 Invader, this version of the Mustang utilized dive flaps, and bomb racks under each wing. Some reinforcing of the structural members was also required because of the G-forces to be encountered in dive bombing. A-36s entered combat service with the USAAF prior to any P-51s. In early 1943 the 86th and 27th Fighter Bomber Groups of the 12th Air Force began flying A-36s out of Northern Africa. Despite some early problems with instability caused by the dive flaps, the A-36 was effective in light bombing and strafing roles. It was not, however, capable of dog fighting with German fighters, especially at higher altitudes. Despite these drawbacks one USAAF pilot, Captain Michael T. Russo, who served with the 16th Bomb Squadron of the 27th Fighter Bomber Group, was credited with five confirmed aerial victories in the A-36, thereby becoming the first mustang ace.

About our Signatures          Search for more Signatures

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price aviation prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

On an RAF airfield in the early evening, a squadron of Lancaster bombers of Bomber Command prepare for another bombing sortie against targets of the German war machine.  A fitting tribute to all Bomber Command aircrew who flew in the Avro Lancatser.

Distant Dispersal by Graeme Lothian. (E)
Half Price! - £70.00
The military trained many of their first world war pilots on the Jenny.  Several thousand Jennies were produced and after the war many of these aircraft were purchased by some of the 20,000 airmen which left the armed services after world war one, paying a fraction of the cost for these aircraft.  Barnstorming began.  These pilots would make a living from Barnstorming across the US, giving rides to civilians for as much at 15 to 20 dollars a trip.  This was a time when most people had not seen an aircraft let alone go up in one.  Barnstorming gradually became saturated with pilots and aircraft and over a short peiod of time the prices paid for a trip in a Jenny went down toas low as 2 to 3 dollars, and making a living became hard for the pilots who could hardly pay for the fuel and living costs let alone aircraft maintenance.  There were a number of fatal accidents, but Barnstorming played a vital role in aviation and probably put the idea of becoming a pilot in the minds of many young boys who would later go on to fly in combat during world war two.

Balmy Days by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Squadron Leader H C Sawyer is depicted here flying his 65 Sqn Spitfire Mk.1a R6799 (YT-D) in the skies above Kent on 31st July 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. Chasing him is Major Hans Trubenbach of 1 Gruppe, Lehrgeschwader 2 in his Messerschmitt Vf109E-3 (Red 12) . The encounter lasted eight minutes with both pilots surviving.

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (F)
Half Price! - £90.00
Signed by Wallace McIntosh, an ex Lanc. rear gunner. Wallace has the distinction of holding the record for Bomber Command kills from the rear turret of Avro Lancaster EM-M LL973 standing at 8 confirmed kills.
Sunset Saviours by Robin Smith.
Half Price! - £95.00

 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944.  These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron.

Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
During the early 1930s, Imperial Airways of London introduced to its European and Eastern routes the HP42, an enormous four-engined Handley Page biplane carrying up to 38 passengers at a sedate 100mph.  For the first time air travellers could enjoy Pullman comfort, the wicker-work chairs finally being dispensed with.  Eight of these outstanding aircraft were built and operated from 1931 to the start of the Second World War.  The European services were flown by the four known as the Heracles class with fleet names Horatius, Hengist and Helena.  The Hannibal class with Horsa, Hanno and Hadrian serviced the Empire routes.  They accumulated over 10 million miles of peacetime operations wthout harm to a single passenger or crew member.  Safety became their byword. Depicted here is Horatius, bound for Paris from Croydon.  What a sight to behold, truly a galleon of the clouds.
Croydon Departure by Gerald Coulson.
Half Price! - £40.00
 German ace Lt. Fritz Roth of Jasta 23, flying an Albatross D.Va scores his first of three balloons in one days action. By the wars end he had accounted for 20 balloons and 8 Allied Aircraft.

Balloon Buster, 25th January 1918 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Half Price! - £60.00

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price naval prints - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 It is September 18th, 1805, off Plymouth. Led by the 74-gun HMS Thunderer, with HMS Ajax astern, HMS Victory, with Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson aboard, begins her journey south to join the rest of the British fleet off Cadiz where the combined French and Spanish fleets lay blockaded. This was the prelude to the Battle of Trafalgar and the last time Nelson would see his beloved England.

Hearts of Oak Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £345.00
 The submarine depot ship HMS Maidstone is pictured off Hong Kong with a quintet of British submarines alongside for replenishment, namely (left to right) an S-class, a U-class, a T-class and two more U-class.

HMS Maidstone by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
HMS Glowworm, burning severely after receiving hits from the mighty Admiral Hipper, is depicted turning to begin her heroic sacrifice off the Norwegian coast on 8th April 1940. Hugely out-gunned and already crippled, Glowworms captain, Lieutenant-Commander Roope rammed his destroyer into the side of the Admiral Hipper, inflicting a 40 metre rip in its armour belt before drifting away and exploding. 38 British sailors were rescued from the sea and Roope was awarded a posthumous VC for his bravery, the first earned by the Royal Navy in WWII.

HMS Glowworms Attack on the Admiral Hipper by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
RFA Fort Austin makes a leisurely rendezvous at sunset with the Polaris submarine HMS Renown on patrol somewhere in mid ocean. Soon a rubber inflatable will be launched from the Fort, and mail and fresh fruit and vegetables will be transferred before darkness sets in and makes the operation more hazardous.

The Rendezvous by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00

 The third of the Royal Navy's Vanguard class submarines, HMS Vigilant (S30) entered service on 2nd November 1996.  She is based at HMNB Clyde at Faslane and carries the UK's nuclear deterrent Trident ballistic missile.  Manned by a crew of 14 officers and 121 men, her main power is supplied by one Rolls Royce PWR2 nuclear reactor driving two GEC turbines.

HMS Vigilant by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £725.00
Americas first true aircraft carrier, the USS Langley (CV-1) is pictured making way at sea as a pair of Douglas DT-2s pass overhead.

USS Langley by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £27.50
 The Queen Elizabeth class battleship HMS Malaya is pictured at Capetown in April 1942 en route to Durban from Gibraltar. A veteran of the First World War, Malaya took part in the Battle of Jutland, receiving eight hits, and going on to serve throughout World War Two, surviving a torpedo off Cape Verde in 1941. She is seen here about to recover her Fairey Swordfish floatplane beneath the dramatic outline of Table Mountain.

HMS Malaya at Capetown, South Africa. by Ivan Berryman (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
Hawker Sea Furies buzz the stern of HMAS Sydney during fleet exercises off Jervis Bay 1956.

Fly Past by Randall Wilson.
Half Price! - £35.00

WORLD WAR TWO MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our half price world war two military - Eight random items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Unterscharfurher Karl-Heinz Turk of the Schwere SS Panzerabteilung 503, in one of the units few remaining Kingtigers, defends the Potsdammer Platz along with elements of the Munchberg Division against the rapidly encroaching Soviet forces.

The Last Battle, Berlin, April 30th 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Müncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th April 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Commandos of 1st Special Service Brigade, led by Lord Lovat, are piped past the defenders of the Caen canal (Pegasus) bridge by piper Bill Millin. The bridge was originally taken in a coup de main attack by the gliders of 6th Airborne Divisions D Company, 2nd battalion Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, led by Major John Howard earlier that morning. Shortly afterwards the glider troops were reinforced by 7 Parachute Battalion, and together they held the area against German attacks until the main British forces landing at Sword beach could fight through to join them.

Piper Bill, Pegasus Bridge, Normandy, 13.00hrs, 6th June 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

The Allied breakthrough into the Normandy plain, against heavy German opposition. Filed marshall Montgomery claimed that Operation Goodwood had two major aims – the first being to break out from the beaches and the other to destroy the German armoured reserves and draw them away from the US forces that were preparing for Operation Cobra in the western sector.  The plan for the breakout began with a massive aerial bombardment, using the strategic air forces large bombers to decimate the German defending forces then Lt-General Richard OConnors VIII Corps comprising three whole armoured divisions – 11th, 7th and Guards - and spearheaded by Major-General Pip Roberts 11th would then rush forward, overwhelm the defending Germans and causing the armoured forces to move forward and break out from the beach areas. To cover the flanks the Canadians would fight their way to Caen, while the British 3rd Infantry and 51st Highland Divisions would cover the left flank,  and move further eastward.

Operation Goodwood, Caen, Normandy, 18th-19th July, 1944 by David Rowlands (C)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Sturmtigers of Sturmmorser Company 1002, commanded by Lieutenant Zippel, take on ammunition in preparation for the battle to come. These fearsome monsters 38cm rocket projectors could penetrate up to 2.5m of reinforced concrete. Luckily for the Allies only 18 were completed by the wars end.

Preparing for the Day, the Reichswald, February 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
 Braving intense enemy fire, Lt. Col. RB Mayne, Commanding Officer 1st SAS Regiment devastated a German ambush and subsequently rescued wounded troops of his own unit who had been pinned down while on a reconnaissance mission for the 4th Canadian Armoured Division.

Paddys Fourth DSO, The Olderburg Raid, 9th April 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 1st Battalion in action at Escaut Canal, Belgium, May 1940. The last Highland Regiment to wear a kilt in battle, attacking the Germans at the River Escaut.  From the Diary of Captain R. Leah, 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders : Tuesday 21st May : Bn left Ere about 2 a.m. to march back. Fortunately Coy Cmdr. were required for some sort of recce and we went in C.O.s car.  Arrived Taintignies 3 a.m. and self went out again with Wilkie in C.O.s car to look for for C Coy which had gone astray, and to see Q.M. about Bn rations in Wez-Velvain.  Could not find either.  Met the Battalion arriving from Ere when I left the village at 3 a.m.  Got back myself at 4 a.m. found empty house which I entered by window and slept well for 5 hours. Officers mess going in house beside M.T. park, and had good breakfast.  Fairly quiet morning and orders to move this afternoon to Bn assembly position S of Wez-Velvain.  Thence we were directed to Merlin and prepared for counter-attack to drive enemy off Western side of Escaut.

The Charge of the 1st Battalion Queens Own Cameron Highlanders by David Rowlands (AP)
Half Price! - £50.00

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: